2.7 Billion Served

You’ve probably heard that the U.S. Postal Service has the nation’s biggest retail network, with more than 30,000 post offices — about as many nationwide locations as McDonald’s, Starbucks, and Walmart combined. Just what does that mean in terms of customer visits, though?

 

Survey Says…!

If you’ve bought stamps or mailed a package at a postal retail counter, the clerk probably directed you to a survey at the bottom of the receipt. Maybe you filled it out to compliment your helpful clerk, or to raise a concern about the appearance of the post office lobby.

No matter your feedback — good, bad, or indifferent — you were heard. The Point of Sale (POS) Survey you took is one of four primary tools the U.S. Postal Service uses to assess customer satisfaction across its various points of contact with customers. Here are the four tools and what they measure:

 

Sustainability and the Triple Bottom Line

As Kermit the Frog sang, it’s not easy being green. Well, Kermit, try achieving corporate sustainability. It’s more than just “going green.” It generally means giving consideration to the environmental, economic, and social impact of a company's business practices.

While it’s not necessarily easy, it’s the responsible thing to do. It’s also good business as more consumers demand that companies be good stewards and corporate citizens. And that includes the Postal Service.

 

Goin’ Mobile

Technology plays a huge role in the fast-moving package delivery market. Package delivery companies that skimp on innovation investments do so at their own risk.

As part of its effort to be the “shipper of choice” for customers, the U.S. Postal Service has invested millions of dollars in Mobile Delivery Devices (MDD), handheld scanners that allow letter carriers to track package delivery in real time via Global Positioning System. Tracking capability, known as package visibility, is essential for USPS to meet market demands.

 

Proof of Delivery

Registered Mail might seem like a service from yesteryear in this day and age of Intelligent Mail barcodes and Informed Delivery, which give customers a sneak peek into their mail via email alerts.

But with proof of mailing and delivery along with strict rules and controls, Registered Mail still appeals to customers who want to send valuable or irreplaceable items through the mail.

 

Using all the Tools in the Toolbox

Managing workhours is a critical part of helping the U.S. Postal Service realize annual productivity gains, which help offset cost increases.

That’s why it’s so important postal management uses all the tools at its disposal to improve productivity. One tool is the mail processing variance (MPV) model, which measures annual mail processing performance and efficiency.

 

Uniformity on Uniforms?

Americans love a man, or woman, in uniform.  Even in the postal world. In fact, many folks would like all postal workers to have uniforms.

Five years ago we ran a blog on rural letter carriers and whether they should wear a uniform, or at least a uniformed shirt – they currently aren’t required. Given that rural routes are increasingly suburban and rural carriers more visible to the public and rural letter carriers serve as something of a post office on wheels, it seemed a logical question to ask.

 

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