Conducive and Convenient CPUs

Location, location, location – it’s the mantra of realtors, of course, but is just as important to retailers and service providers, like the U.S. Postal Service. USPS understands the importance of being where people live and shop. It also knows that keeping hours conducive to people’s shopping habits increases customer traffic. Cue contract postal units (CPUs), which the Postal Service uses to supplement its 32,000 post offices around the country.

 

Platinum Anniversary

Twenty years ago, E.R. was the number one TV show, Macarena topped the pop music charts, and Independence Day (the original) was the highest-grossing movie of the year. A stamp cost 32 cents, and, oh yes, the U.S. Postal Service Office of Inspector General (OIG) was created.

On September 30, 1996, President Clinton signed the amended Inspector General Act of 1978 to establish a separate enforcement and oversight agency for the Postal Service, moving that responsibility to the newly created and fully independent OIG.

 

Keep on Truckin’

The American economy runs on trucks. Nearly 70 percent of all the freight tonnage in the United States moves on big rubber wheels. It’s not an overstatement to say that without the trucking industry and its drivers, the economy would come to a crashing halt.

But the trucking industry faces a projected shortage of 46,000 drivers in the next 3 years. That’s a tough situation under any circumstances, but factor in the continued growth of ecommerce, which is putting a greater number of trucks on the road, and that driver shortage is even more alarming.

 

Oil and Gas Rights

There’s gold in them thar hills. Black gold that is. And gas and minerals. It’s not likely to spawn a TV show, like The Beverly Hillbillies, but the U.S. Postal Service has some experience with oil and gas leases, and earning royalties from them.

 

The Best-Laid Plans…

With mail volume declining and the mail mix changing, the U.S. Postal Service is adjusting processing capacity and the size of the network to better match the current workload. But getting to the end game has been painful, with plenty of bumps and bruises. Service, in particular, has taken a hit.

 

Helping Cities Get Smarter

The world may be getting smaller, but cities are getting bigger. More than 80 percent of the country’s population lives in urban areas, according to U.S. Census Bureau data.

Fortunately, cities are getting smarter too. Using technology, data, and analytics, cities can implement “smart” projects with the aim of decreasing traffic congestion, cutting pollution, improving infrastructure, and better managing the overall territory of the city. For example, in Kansas City, Internet-connected devices can direct streetlights to dim unless they detect motion, saving energy.

 

Famous Former Postal Workers

There was a time when, if you lived in Spokane, Bing Crosby might have sold you stamps across a post office counter. If you lived in Chicago, Walt Disney might have delivered your mail – or maybe Rock Hudson, if you were just up the road in nearby Winnetka. More recently, before he starred in The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Steve Carell might have put letters in your mailbox if it was in rural Massachusetts. And have you ever wondered where the Grammy-winning John Prine got the title for his album The Singing Mailman Delivers?

 

Image Is Everything

There’s no denying it: Looks matter. Appearance creates a first impression that is hard to erase. And when you’re talking about postal retail facilities, how they look is essential to the U.S. Postal Service’s business.

Unfortunately, too many retail facilities have fallen into disrepair.

 

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