Oil and Gas Rights

There’s gold in them thar hills. Black gold that is. And gas and minerals. It’s not likely to spawn a TV show, like The Beverly Hillbillies, but the U.S. Postal Service has some experience with oil and gas leases, and earning royalties from them.


The Best-Laid Plans…

With mail volume declining and the mail mix changing, the U.S. Postal Service is adjusting processing capacity and the size of the network to better match the current workload. But getting to the end game has been painful, with plenty of bumps and bruises. Service, in particular, has taken a hit.


Helping Cities Get Smarter

The world may be getting smaller, but cities are getting bigger. More than 80 percent of the country’s population lives in urban areas, according to U.S. Census Bureau data.

Fortunately, cities are getting smarter too. Using technology, data, and analytics, cities can implement “smart” projects with the aim of decreasing traffic congestion, cutting pollution, improving infrastructure, and better managing the overall territory of the city. For example, in Kansas City, Internet-connected devices can direct streetlights to dim unless they detect motion, saving energy.


Famous Former Postal Workers

There was a time when, if you lived in Spokane, Bing Crosby might have sold you stamps across a post office counter. If you lived in Chicago, Walt Disney might have delivered your mail – or maybe Rock Hudson, if you were just up the road in nearby Winnetka. More recently, before he starred in The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Steve Carell might have put letters in your mailbox if it was in rural Massachusetts. And have you ever wondered where the Grammy-winning John Prine got the title for his album The Singing Mailman Delivers?


Image Is Everything

There’s no denying it: Looks matter. Appearance creates a first impression that is hard to erase. And when you’re talking about postal retail facilities, how they look is essential to the U.S. Postal Service’s business.

Unfortunately, too many retail facilities have fallen into disrepair.


Remaking International Money Orders

The world is getting smaller, and not just because viruses and bacteria from foreign countries are showing up here. We can buy something made halfway around the world and have it on our doorstep in a few days. We can also instantaneously send across national boundaries not only information, but money as well.  


The Freebie that Pays

People like free stuff. People also are more likely to buy something once they try it. So, it makes sense that offering free, trial-size samples of everything from laundry detergent to shampoo is a frequently used arrow in the sales-and-marketing quiver. 


Surf’s Up

The U.S. Postal Service’s foray into digital products is similar to the United States’ showing in international soccer tournaments. We start strong, but then fall behind the rest of the world powers.