The U.S. Postal Service has almost 80,000 rural delivery routes serviced by some 133,000 rural letter carriers. For some of those routes, USPS provides the vehicle; for others, the carrier uses a private vehicle and receives a maintenance allowance from the Postal Service for wear and tear. In fiscal year (FY) 2020, the Postal Service paid out nearly $583 million in maintenance allowances — a rise of $71 million, or 13 percent, over FY 2015.

Not long ago, the Postal Service started converting some private-vehicle rural routes to USPS-vehicle routes, estimating the change would save $888 million over six years. For a recent audit, we reviewed a sample of these completed conversions nationwide as well as future conversions, and found that the Postal Service’s strategy for these changes was generally effective. We also discovered a few shortcomings.

For instance, maximum savings weren’t realized because USPS wasn’t implementing conversions in a timely manner, and we determined that some of the future conversions wouldn’t be the most cost-effective. We made a couple recommendations to improve the process, and Postal Service management agreed with both.

Are you a rural letter carrier, or do you know one? How does a USPS-vehicle route compare with the private-vehicle route? Does one seem more cost-effective from your point of view?

Comments (197)

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  • anon

    The postal service should do a better job of evaluating where they could receive the most benefit of placing a USPS vehicle versus a PV vehicle. Instead, they have just issued blanket statements of over 108 miles or under such such miles. Some rural routes are much tougher on a vehicle than others. I was assigned a Metris spring of 2021. First set of brakes went out at 5k miles. Next set of brakes & first set of tires wore out at 13k miles. I'm currently at 23k+ miles and brakes are starting to squeal plus a tire is wearing bad on 1 side. I estimate maybe another 2k to 3k miles before both will have to be replaced again. Then when it's time to service the Metris they have to tow it 2 hrs to the nearest facility. This also doesn't include wait time charged to the USPS on defrosting & tire problems on the route. The Metris will not go in inclement weather and it is a safery hazard during those times. The Metris is easy to deliver out of though. It is comfortable but the mail tray should be raised a couple inches. I can definitely see the benefits of placement on a lot of certain routes but I'm not sure they are going to hold up long term on rugged routes.

    Feb 13, 2022
  • anon

    I'm a rural carrier serving a route with 114 miles, over 30 of those miles are gravel. I use my own vehicle and after hearing LLV and Metris horror stories, I'd like it to stay that way. I know my POV is safe and properly maintained. I can't trust a postal vehicle would be.

    Feb 13, 2022
  • anon

    A GOV would be a huge improvement, however AWD or 4 wheel drive is an absolute necessity in a lot of areas. If you are just going to pass down the wore out old LLV's then done bother. Also, adequate cargo space is a must. For safety and visibility, windows, blind spots around the LLV are terrible.

    Feb 12, 2022
  • anon

    What is cost effective? In order to purchase a commercial warranty on a vehicle, it needs to be new. And you will need a warranty. Over $40,000 out of pocket to do a job that pays just a little over that. And why the metris? Why not ford's van in England? Or royal mails van? Or Honda or Toyota vans from Japan? Or Nissan truck from Australia? Why can't we use already in production RHD diesel vehicles that get 30-40mpg? UPS and FEDEX have no issue using these vans. From my records. Using a POV cost me $2,700 a year out of pocket on a new vehicle. I can't imagine what it costs usps to run the metris let alone an llv.

    Feb 12, 2022
  • anon

    Hello, I am a regular rural carrier and have been for almost 20 years. I have been driving a private owned vehicle for about 21 years and have been through several vehicles because of the wear and tear. I had the experience of driving a postal vehicle for about 2 years. Loved the idea of driving until the cut in pay took effect because of the EMA and because I had no choice to choose high option because of I was shy of the 10-year mark. While driving a private owned vehicle my credit cards have took a big jump because of so many repairs in order to get the mail delivered. I would prefer to drive a postal owned vehicle because I would not have to worry about the repairs, and it is much safer because most of have to straddle to deliver and less painful. I feel that more rcas would stay to do the job if they didn't have to worry about supplying their own vehicles for wear and tear. There are however some carriers that cannot afford to take that $10000 or more pay cut after having got in debt to do the repairs. I recently just bought a van and had the conversion kit put in it and because of amazon that is not even big enough for my route. If I didn't get the package help, there would be several days I would have to make a second trip.

    Feb 12, 2022
  • anon

    Seems real fair even if your on a pov route you still get an LLv and keep the pay from your routes evaluation from 2018 for your route so cost effective lol your paying for an pov on a route that was counted as having a pov but letting them use an llv lol letter count was .0232 dps llv .0333 with pov

    Feb 11, 2022
  • anon

    It’s hard to justify any savings at all when we are spending more in gas to drive all the increased Amazon packages to the door. We should be delivering their smaller packages to the mailboxes that we already deliver the mail to. I see Amazon pulling up to the same house I am at, at the same time and they have a small little spur and I’m dragging a mini fridge out of my truck! Makes NO sense especially when supreme gas is almost $4 a gallon!

    Feb 10, 2022
  • anon

    I have done both types of routes. The biggest issue with the POV is the lack of appropriate and affordable vehicles. I am on a very rural route with harsh winters and need a 4wd or AWD. Using a RHD converted Jeep grand Cherokee now but with the increase in amazon (4 years since last mail count) it is no longer large enough to handle the package volume without multiple trips which involve a minimum of 15 minutes drive time to go back to the office. Providing an AWD van or minivan with RHD would be great for my route. There would still be some days where weather prohibits delivery but not that many. The biggest reason to provide government vehicles in to aid in hiring and retention of new employees. Not many people can afford to buy a vehicle large enough and capable of delivering out the right hand side on $19/hour for 1-2 days a week. The EMA reimbursement only covers costs if you have almost no breakdowns or can do some of your own maintenance. Plus it is paid after the fact so it take quite some time to save enough for a more appropriate vehicle. The solution is simple, more GOV routes will equal more new hires and higher RCA retention. Provided the USPS actually gets vehicles that work in all climates. They may need some 4WD, some AWD and some can still be 2wd or front wheel drive. Common sense should be a guide here.

    Feb 10, 2022
  • anon

    Rural Carrier is on the hook for vehicle insurance say 1000k to 2000k as a route vehicle & repairs tires 500 & general repairs. & maintenance brakes oil 1000k. I'd say a no brainer to allow carrier to handle all that. If a carrier receives 9000k in ema, I would guess its prolly close to a wash when factoring in above stated expenses. If the carrier has to replace their vehicle or has to pay for major repair transmission or engine then carrier exceeds the 9000k estimated ema in a given year. Fuel is approximately 4$ a gallon current times. id say 6000k for a 50mile a day route serviced days a week.

    Feb 10, 2022
  • anon

    We need vehicles to keep subs, that can’t afford to buy a vehicle and insurance for a part time job. It’s dangerous to drive from the middle of a vehicle also. Something needs to be done

    Feb 10, 2022
  • anon

    The problem is as a RCA getting hired they don’t have the funds to buy a right hand drive therefore when we hire new RCA’s we let them come in because we are desperate and give them a chance to buy a vehicle then they won’t do it we seem to cater to that as a rule carrier the pay for your vehicle maintenance allowance does not equal what we actually spend in the wear and tear of the gas and expenses that we put to our vehicles that is why I bid on a LLV route when it came available

    Feb 10, 2022
  • anon

    If the Post Office is going to continue to deliver Amazon. They really need to supply vans for delivery. However the Metris is a total disaster in ice and snow. The reality is there is no options for a rural carrier to deliver in but older cars and a few suvs. There is only 1 new right hand drive option available to us and its a 50k jeep. About time for the Postal service to become a truly professional organization and supply vehicles to all delivery routes.

    Feb 10, 2022
  • anon

    Let’s be REALISTIC USPS would not be saving any money on their own fleet if it were providing a vehicle that wasn’t 35 years old, in horrible shape, or had any real safety features. The one size fits all approach is not only outdated and washed up thinking, but the lack of new hires proves that it is. Area and climate specific designs are an absolute necessity and to think your bottom line “cost savings” of converting high mileage POV routes to a Metris where you won’t even allow for the 91 octane gas to be used, thereby destroying the engine in just a few short years is a solution, then we all see the writing on the wall.

    Feb 09, 2022
  • anon

    Having a postal vehicle provided for my route would probably help with RCA retention and my overall stress level. Having a right hand drive vehicle provided would increase safety because of seatbelt use. Not having to worry about keeping a vehicle running would keep employees.

    Feb 09, 2022
  • anon

    I am on a POV route. Although I love my ac in SWFL, it is impossible to get a sub of record. Subs prefer a route with a provided Postal vehicle. Wear, tear, fuel (especially in today's economy), insurance.

    Feb 09, 2022
  • anon

    The USPS vehicles are INEFFICIENT for Rural Carriers. Private vehicles are also inefficient. Packages has made both of these means of transporting mail slower/unsafe . The amt of oversize parcels has increased to the point that OVER 50 % each and everyday they take up more space then reg mail. There are no shelves in mail trucks . Every parcel has to be handled or "touched" min of 5x a day or MORE before delivery because they have to be constantly moved from on top of the mail and constantly have to be looked at so one doesnt get left behind. There is no way to train a new carrier in a consistent manner. Day to day the volume changes and new ways are being tried all the time to be more efficient . It gets VERT TIRING moving/sorting/moving parcels all the time and parcels are coming in more and more damaged . There is no communication between the processing plant and individual offices. There is no way possible to maintain any kind of time management ea day because the parcels have increased and 2 and 3 trips are being done daily and traffic is heavier as the day gets later. Animals has also really been an issue. When parcels are placed on porches the dogs are going nuts and jumping/tearing up doors. They are opening doors and running out of the house and chasing carriers. The other main issue is weather. Mail trucks get stuck in tiny amts snow and small inclines are impossible to even go up them without having to be physically pushed. The gas alone , burns up a tank a day rfrom getting stuck. It is also IMPOSSIBLE to even see out when the interior light is on .

    Feb 09, 2022
  • anon

    POV carrier coming up on 20yrs. Even with a suv I’m making 2,3rd trips for Amazon 2-3 days per week. AWD a must. EMA does not pay enough to maintain the vehicle especially if you have to keep getting bigger vehicles to accommodate Amazon. I would only drive a van if it’s 4 wheel drive. Other ones will only get stuck. Take time to talk to us rural carriers! We have lots of ideas and have experience with what works and does not.

    Feb 09, 2022
  • anon

    I agree! I would also take one if 4wheel drive. My roads are mud in the spring and icy in the winter. Amazon is taking over. I’m sure they can’t be saving to much money if mail trucks keep getting towed. I have AWD and studs and some days are still crazy.

    Feb 13, 2022
  • anon

    I think all routes should have postal vehicles. I work in stroudsburg and it is so hard to get rural subs in that office because they need a car. It’s wearing down the regulars because we always have open routes. Everyday. We need vehicles asap

    Feb 09, 2022
  • anon

    I’ve been on both, trying to keep vehicles running on a pov route is a endless task , let alone finding one big enough and affordable to do the job, that being said, a Gov vehichle would be great if they actually came up with one to do the job properly all year long , parts of the country do get snow and need all wheel or 4 wheel drive! I have a metris assigned to my route that I can’t even use because of the weather , now that’s some smart government thinking … I really don’t know who sits and thinks of putting us in these vehicles , they should be fired!!!!They preach safety first , that’s a joke , we can’t even get a decent vehicle to do our jobs in!!! Someone needs to wake up!!! I’m sure most rural Carriers would be happy to have a gov vehicle if it actually suited all out needs !!! Rear wheel drive to deliver in when you live in Northern Indiana is not a option, do these clowns think we drive around all day on clean roads , boxes that are cleared , and beautiful driveways?? We do not , maybe the clowns that come up with brilliant ideas take a metris out on a rural route either during or after a snow storm..

    Feb 09, 2022
  • anon

    "For instance, maximum savings weren’t realized because USPS wasn’t implementing conversions in a timely manner, and we determined that some of the future conversions wouldn’t be the most cost-effective. We made a couple recommendations to improve the process, and Postal Service management agreed with both." Really??? Remove the execution of implementation from Postal Managers. Use an outside organization whose primary job is to implement the job in a cost effective manner with a deadline that is strictly enforced. Get rid of managers who stall in order to not do a "job." As a rural carrier, purchasing a Mercedes Benz to deliver mail out of in is insane. Whatever the fallout with Grumman was, efforts should be made to reestablish communications with them for a modified LLV. These vehicles are work horses and with a few safety modifications and OSHA upgrades (ie walk in cargo area, etc) these vehicles are the SAFEST AND EASIEST OF ALL CURRENT POSTAL VEHICLES TO PERFORM CURBSIDE DELIVERY!! UPSP - Wake up and smell the coffee!! You're sitting on a gold mine and don't even realize it! THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME IN THIS MATTER.

    Feb 09, 2022
  • anon

    It is so difficult to find subs if there are ANY pov routes in the office because then all subs are required to have one even if they are not the primary sub on a POV routes. Most people don't want to or can't afford to spend money on a vehicle and conversions and not even know if they can make the 90 days. PLEASE get ALL USPS vehicles.

    Feb 09, 2022
  • anon

    Especially for rural carriers, 4WD is necessary. A right side drive SUV is an excellent choice instead of creating a new vehicle.

    Feb 09, 2022
  • anon

    How about oig do an audit on real costs of the metris... Seems that from posts, observations, etc on different platforms that the opinion is these rear wheel drive vans are not satisfactory..bad weather driving, breakdowns, poor gas mileage, etc.... and a personal observation; Chrysler vans are stronger and front wheel drive. Where they even considered?. Actually-were any carriers even consulted?..

    Feb 09, 2022
  • anon

    The writing is on the wall for POV routes. Very few vehicles you can deliver mail out of being produced. Those need heavy modifications, or sky high price tags. Only old-time Regular Carriers making lots of money can afford. The PO will be unable to hire new employees if they have to provide a vehicle. Its become to expensive, and too hard.

    Feb 09, 2022
  • anon

    They really should put vans on all the rural routes. They're bigger than most anything someone can get as a POV, which is important with how many packages are being delivered now, sometimes two and three trips out just to deliver all of them simply because they won't all fit in a POV which not only wastes time AND makes the customer have to wait even longer to get service, but it's even more milage the Post Office has to pay on top of the normal EMA. Also, when you're delivering out in the middle of nowhere, a random, unmarked, regular-looking POV pulling up to a house by itself in the middle of the woods isn't exactly safe. It's a good way to get shot.

    Feb 09, 2022
  • anon

    Please provide vehicles

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    I’ve been delivering by POV for 28 years and prefer to keep it that way. My route is 104 miles, very rural with large hills and gravel roads. We are over an hour away from any large city and don’t have a gas station in the town my office is in. For these reasons I feel a GOV vehicle is impractical. There is no dealership to service one, no gas station to fill it up and no place to park it when not in use. The rear wheel drive nightmares which have been issued to some carriers would never get the job done except on dry summer days without snow and mud. During times of breakdown it would take several hours to deliver a replacement vehicle while I’m waiting along the road for rescue. My POV is maintained to ensure I’m able to work and I know what work has been done unlike a GOV vehicle that floats from place to place with no record to the next driver on maintenance or reliability. This in my opinion is a disaster waiting to happen. The new vans from what I’m told are not reliable and are broke more than in use. If the GOV vehicles are breaking down at record speed what will we deliver in? I’m not keeping a POV as a spare for the Postal Service. If I’m issued a GOV vehicle I will no longer supply my own and it will be someone else’s problem to get me a replacement in times of need.

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    Had a POV for years and the EMA never covered the cost of insurance, repairs and gas. The only bonus was 4wd and a heater. I’ve been LLV for two years on a rural route in the mountains/lakes region of NH. Yea it’s cold but the LLV is so much less stressful and I’d never go back to POV.

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    I really like driving the GOV metris van. I don't have the anxiety worrying about what if my vehicle breaks down and how much will it cost? I do wish they would raise the mail trays a couple of inches. They are too low. They also need more signage on the back to let people know we make frequent stops. These vans look a lot like Fedex vans and a lot of people think we are Fedex and don't realize we are stopping at mailboxes. PLEASE put built in flashing lights on these and BIG logos on the rear so we won't get rear ended. Thanks!

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    As a rural carrier who had a POV and is now in an LLV my opinion is it is much easier to deliver from the LLV but not nearly as safe as a POV. Rear wheel drive trucks are not meant for the snow and ice we deal with. Would be more cost effective to have a vehicle that would go on all rural rads regardless of the weather

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    Being a carrier that has had a POV and a government vehicle route I can say all Rural Routes need to convert to Government vehicles eventually. You need to focus converting routes with majority of CBU and Centralized boxes to maximize your return. These route will have far fewer breakdowns and are usually shorter routes. That will cause your investments to last much longer and require far less repairs. Focus on more condense population centers and then work your way out from there. The last thing you want is to give a route a government vehicle on terrible roads and have to travel those roads a far greater distance. Eat the EMA cost on those routes and save on the others.

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    Thanks

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    I just quit the PO after using my own vehicles for approx 20 years ! Why am I subsidizing the PO by using my own vehicle ? Ppl are using old buicks and driving from the passenger seat !! The PO preaches safety, how is this safe ?? How can the po expect to hire ppl at around $19..0/hr and expect them to provide a vehicle ?? The EMA allowance cannot possibly cover all the expenses to maintain a vehicle especially when its used to deliver the mail !! The PO needs to provide vehicles for all routes and have appropriate vehicles in the various climates !

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    We are a small 2 route office hoping to have an aux route added soon. My route is a pov route. The other route is a postal vehicle. With all of the added Amazon parcels we now receive, it's ridiculous to even have pov routes. Our vehicles are not large enough or equipped to handle that many parcels. I make atleast 2 trips daily and sometimes 3. Not only is it the large parcel volume, but finding an rca that is willing to use their own vehicle is getting harder and harder. If all routes had postal vehicles provided, it would be easier to hire/keep rcas. The amount of time and money that I have to put into my vehicles maintanence is getting worse as my vehicle gets older and more worn down.

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    Living in a rural area I understand the meaning of back country roads. In the summer we are visited by many from urban settings. A good amount of these "folk" won't drive their vehicles on the back roads or if they do, they are off to the nearest hose or car wash, which by the way can be 20 miles away, to clean them. They are also certain that driving on these roads, even at the snail pace they do, has inflicted great damage on their vehicles. So, when you award a contract to us "local folk" and provide us with a budget line item to use our own vehicles, great care will be taken to ensure that no matter the road conditions, winter, spring, summer or fall, we will maintain them as they are our livelihood. Give us a bright shiny new USPS vehicle, which by the way costs you at least twice, if not three times the amount of what we need to operate the route in our own vehicle, is not practical. This is not to say we will drive faster or fail to recognize the warning lights on the dashboard, or really run it through the ditches of mud season, or run it into a snow bank, it just means it is not ours, it is not our livelihood, if it breaks or needs repair you will supply us with another. Rural Route Carriers have not chosen this profession to masse great amounts of money. They do it to make a living and serve their local communities. People they know, people they recognize, they keep their eyes out for the elderly and the young and because of their day to day jobs, they spot when something is awry and can either lend a hand or call the police. USPS needs to make better decisions. As I read the Inspector General Reports I can not help but to think whether those making some of these calls have really thought this through. Many contracting officers rather than admit an error stand on pride. We can all do better and a good place to start is with honesty and the ability to admit our failures.

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    My suggestion is that you provide enough of a budget line item to the carriers that they can afford the right vehicle for the job. These vehicles will be maintained by them as it is their livelihood. I believe the net effect of doing so will be an increase in amounts paid to the carriers and a decrease in the amount USPS has to spend trying to do the same.

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    We only have one POV route out of 49 routes. It is not only difficult for relief carriers to obtain a vehicle to use on relief days, it is also not safe for the carriers to have to straddle while delivering. I believe the PO should do away with POV routes and provide vehicles for all if possible.

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    I prefer my on pov. I have alot of back roads that an llv has a tough time maneuvering on especially in rain and snow. I can put my pov in 4 wheel drive and have no issues

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    I prefer my pov to usps vehicle because I like my heat, 4x4 and A/C. Why not make usps vehicles more appropriate for the areas they are used in. Like electric for CA, 4x4 and heat for the northern states, air conditioning for the Southern states. Wouldn't that be more cost effective?

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    Getting a van would save the USPS so much. Many times Rural carriers have to make more than one trip for packages especially in the holiday season because their vehicles simply won’t hold what the new vans will. Safety for rural carriers would be increased too because a marked van pulling up to someone’s house is much better than a personal vehicle. USPS needs to get these vehicles delivered to all rural routes and start saving money today.

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    I am on a POV route. Fortunately I have a husband who provides my maintenance. Brake pads every 3 months. Oil changed every 3000 miles. Tires once per year with frequent plugs for nails etc. Transmission service once per year. Those are the basics. I feel that my POV is better maintained than any LLV in the country. But it comes at a cost. If the USPS would purchase a durable vehicle that was made to endure the conditions we encounter and provided routine maintenance to prevent breakdown it would probably be beneficial to them. The initial cost would be a lot, but with proper maintenance it could save them in the long run. But they need to do some research and see what engines are built to last, what transmission have issues or not. Either way without proper maintenance nothing will last. I’m still waiting for the Metris I was trained for a year ago!

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    This would be a big cost savings for USPS in more than one way. Not only would USPS be saving on EMA for a majority of routes, they would also save on employee retention. One of the biggest reasons part time rural craft employees quit is because they have to provide a vehicle. If all routes had a vehicle, USPS would be able to hire and retain more employees saving on expensive training costs.

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    I believe that its more cost effective to have government vehicles on rural routes; I’ve had to use my own vehicle when I first started and the stress of breakdown and cost was why I switched to a route with a LLV . With that said I also believe it should be a choice I know a lot of carriers want to keep their POV’s. Also the new vehicles should at least have all wheel drive / 4 wheel drive.; some of these rural routes need it in the winter weather to be able to deliver the mail without getting stuck ; then there is the expense of tow truck cost .

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    The LLV’s are 30 years old and they break down constantly, they are not cost efficient (or safe) for the USPS anymore. I drive one and hate it, I miss my POV! And the new vans are complete junk, every carrier I know with one is also constantly having issues. Would it really be to hard for the USPS to go to Jeep and make a deal? Especially for the routes with weather issues!

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    I am not sure if it is cost effective. However, my route could not be completed with a 2wd postal vehicle. I have mountainous, muddy, ruddy dirt roads. I believe the postal policy of “one size fits all” approach to vehicles is the problem. Vehicles need to be assigned by need and type for different routes and areas. USPS should purchase RHD Jeep’s for some routes. Also, I believe employee retention would greatly improve with all routes being assigned vehicles. I like my POV, however, the rising cost and inability to find a cost effective replacement, are making me consider if this job is worth keeping. With the staffing shortage and most carriers working 6 days a week, then working on our POVs on our one day off, is unsustainable. You should consider if more lost employees is also cost effective due to this issue. I hope this helps. Please feel free to contact me if you want a more detailed understanding from the carriers perspective.

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    I was recently awarded a route that requires a POV. This route has been supposed to get a government vehicle for years but it hasn't happened. I'm disappointed that I'll have to purchase a 10-20k vehicle just to get this promotion. It will be very very hard to get a sub on this route too, as they would have to make a similar investment to be able to work on this route.

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    I’m a rural carrier in WV with a 53 mile POV route. Denied incentive last October to purchase new POV. USPS had 60 days to put vehicle on my route. Hasn’t happened yet. I don’t want it anyway. I have more than 5 miles of gravel/dirt roads and the metris nor an LLV would be able to go across some of my roads in the snow. Without 4wd I can’t go. USPS does not take those needs into consideration and should.

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    I had a government vehicle (metris van/LLV) assigned to my rural route for almost a year. VOMA deemed both unsafe, but management still made me drive it. These vehicles would work on routes that are on hard surface roads, but not on rural gravel/crushed rock. There are some routes that only a POV can be safely driven. The metris van I had could not safely be driven on my route. Doors would open as I was driving, fan motor filled with dust, entire van filled with dust, doors would not shut, traction control quit, tires would be shredded in 3000 miles and maintenance was not done in a timely manner. I filled out vehicle repair tags and would need to wait a few days/week because I work out of a RMPO. If I had trouble on the route vehicle maintenance took an hour to find me and most of the time only had an LLV for a replacement, which was extremely dangerous on a gravel/crushed route of over 100 miles. I filled out numerous safety forms and management would ignore, said they would look into it. I would get stuck in the winter multiple times daily and then sit waiting for over 3 hours for a tow. I feel safer in a POV that I know is able to serve my route in all weather conditions.

    Feb 08, 2022
  • anon

    When I was an RCA, I had a POV. In fact, I maintained 2 POVs just so I would not miss a day of work. It was very expensive. Between gas, insurance, car payments, repairs, etc. the EMA did not cover what was needed to maintain one POV let alone 2 so I transferred to an all LLV office. The LLVs are great as far as cargo capacity and moveability within the vehicle. I can easily access mail without causing undue stress to my body. When it comes to the winter, we really need a vehicle on these rural routes with AWD or 4 wheel drive. I have entire roads on my route I cannot access for months in the winter with an LLV. It is really a disservice to our customers, especially our elderly customers in rural areas. I was never an anxious person driving in the snow until I was given an LLV and I nearly rolled one over on an icy road. Now, I have to take several anxiety medications just to get through the winter. I would feel much safer if the postal vehicle could handle snow.

    Feb 08, 2022

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