Few businesses are happy when employee turnover is high. It’s usually a sign of lackluster employee engagement, and it’s expensive to hire and train new workers. Keeping an eye on employee turnover rates and what may be causing them to rise is generally a good business practice.

We recently looked at the U.S. Postal Service’s effectiveness in reducing turnover for a particular class of worker – non-career employees – and evaluating the underlying reasons for the turnover. Non-career employees are temporary workers who don’t receive the same benefits as career employees, and they’re not always guaranteed a set schedule. The Postal Service hires non-career employees not only to supplement its regular workforce, but also to provide greater scheduling flexibility and reduce staffing costs.

Management estimated USPS saved about $8 billion in labor costs from fiscal years 2016 to 2019 by using non-career employees. The good news is non-career turnover decreased from 42.8 percent in 2016 to 38.5 percent in 2019. However, that still exceeded the Postal Service’s 2019 target rate for non-career turnover of 34.08 percent.

We also found that USPS didn’t measure the cost-savings associated with reducing non-career employee turnover. Moreover, management hasn’t developed a single, national strategic plan for recruiting, hiring, and retaining non-career employees.

The three top reasons for leaving that non-career employees cited in exit surveys were inflexible schedules, physical demands, and dislike of supervisors. While management said it paid attention to exit surveys, we found there was little effective follow-up on addressing concerns.

We made two recommendations: Management should develop a national strategic plan for recruiting, hiring, and retaining non-career employees, and it should also measure cost-savings associated with reducing non-career employee turnover.

What do you think the Postal Service could do to lessen turnover of non-career employees? Tell us in the comment section below.

Comments (97)

  • anon

    After reading the comments here, I don't feel the need to add what has already been said about the life and times of a CCA! For me, I had been a CCA for 24 months and quite frankly had enough of the mis-treatment and just recently happily resigned! I worked out of the South Plainfield NJ PostOffice which is a small office in comparison, and been without a union rep. for a little over a year, therefore problems and mistreatment are even worse than ever. I HAD ENOUGH!!! 7 days a week, 10-12 hours a day with no notice of days off NO MORE!!! I make it my point to let anyone who asked me about what I did for a living and anyone who are interested in joining the USPS, to be forewarned. If by some miracle the culture should change I wish nothing but the best to everyone.

    Feb 24, 2021
  • anon

    I started as a cca 6 months ago. I applied to Usps because of Covid, and needed a more secure job. That being said, I work 10-12 hours a day. I’m not sure what the complaints are about. This isn’t an easy job and it’s not for all walks of life. You have to be cut from a different type of cloth. It’s physically demanding. Get in shape. You’ll be on different routes, get familiar with the town you’re working at. You’ll be tired and not have time for yourself and there’s no work life balance, drink 6-12 beers a night to dull the pain and regrets. The pay isn’t very good for the amount of labor...

    Feb 18, 2021
  • anon

    My comments are unfortunately mostly negative. 1. Weight loss is a sure thing when one is a CCA, walking an average of 15-17 miles per day. This is not necessarily a bad thing but can be taxing on a daily basis. 2. Physical problems begin after a few months such as very painful feet. 3. The cost of quality shoes that make work tolerable adds up. 4. Being treated without respect or regard for one's personal life, being worked from early morning to late at night. 5. Rarely a day off, sometimes working two weeks or more in a row. 6. Not being able to get advance notice on a day off. They often tell you the night before that you're off the next day. 7. One has to call out if they need to see a doctor, do grocery shopping or simply try to connect with family/friends. 8. The sheer lack of care for the CCA is what is the most difficult to deal with. 9. Humanity and kindness is definitely missing 10. Supervisors seem angry at CCAs, letting their own frustrations out on them. Maybe they fear for their jobs? Maybe they are being treated poorly themselves? They see the CCA as a threat? Is there perhaps the thinking of being superior to the CCA for whatever reason? I don't know. 11. Being told that you had to resign at the end of one year, then re-apply. This is probably in hopes of them not wanting you to re-apply and eventually taking on a mail carrier position with all the benefits that come with it. It's most likely more profitable to work the CCA to exhaustion, have them quit and then hire the next body. 12. Being a CCA is fitting for a person, trying to make some extra income, short term, such as a college student during summer break.

    Feb 04, 2021
  • anon

    Employee turn over could be reduced if they didn't mandate an employee to resign if they choose not to take a career appointment. Employee turnover could also be reduced DRAMATICALLY if ALL employees were treated the same and given the same benefits and proper tools to do their job.

    Feb 01, 2021
  • anon

    The turn over of CIty Carrier Assistants is over 50%!! The non benefits isn't the issue it is the lack of respect and treatment management has to these employees. The number one biggest issue is there is NO/Zero work life balance. CCAs are treated as expendable and in such NEVER has a set schedule or know when they will be done with work. CCAs are required to work as much as 21 days strait with no set end time. CCAs are only suppose to have a maximum shift of 12hrs however that contractual agreement is being broken on a daily basis and they are working 13-14 hrs a day. This sets a bad tone for CCAs for not only are they being abused and over worked by management the union won't back them on the 12 hr contractual obligation. CCAs are working 60-74 hrs a week and when driving a USPS vehicle they are putting their life and the public at risk for a severe accident to occur due to being overworked.

    Jan 31, 2021
  • anon

    Make sure that there's adequate vehicles and routes as well as the ability to hire enough staff. Because, specifically in Smithfield, UT, their carriers are expected to do extremely long routes in short periods of time leading to excess stress and corners being cut as far as safety goes. In Logan, UT, where my husband currently works as a CCA, his days off that were put in the schedule have been repeatedly taken away (which shouldn't be legal). They have usually been taken with less than 24 hours notice. They send career people home early and give CCAs the extra pieces (keep them late). Careers have specifically asked for the extra hours and were denied, while CCAs asked for a few less hours and were also denied. I'm not sure what kind of sick game is going on there.

    Jan 07, 2021
  • anon

    Well first they destroy a non career employee with unknown answers from the first day you hired.If you are hired on contract as a non career employee,trust me when I say the hard worker are taken advantage of more than a lazy worker.They force non employee workers to work 6 days a week but lately from the 2nd week of November til Dec 31 here at the distribution they have mandated 6 -7 days a week 10-12 hrs a day. During the covid and holidays the management has been out of control and the distribution wasnt set up for the disaster with lack of equipment,lack of hard workers,lack of leadership, and did decrease on shipping where the dock is full to leave it deadlocked. One big problem is how they promise non career employees about converting into a regular clerk in 24-30 months but many people have spoken to the latest of converting was 5 years. Regulars work 5 days a week 8 hrs a day if you call it working using their seniority rank on lower workers and on break all the time. Seems like the distribution in Raleigh NC is the most worst ran job I ever seen. People walk around under the influence where they never test the workers but once only when they hired and to note they dont report there covid cases,just try to clean it up. I actually got a pic of a career worker sleeping on the job taken advantage of the place and supervisor know it. What a perfect example of excuses why we are always behind.

    Dec 16, 2020
  • anon

    I’m a CCA and it’s not so bad! The money is equivalent to the work you do. The turnover is high because people expect to be getting good pay and work in a/c. That is not the case. The work is hard and the time spent at different stations is hard, but you need to remember that back in the days, it was much worse.

    Dec 05, 2020
  • anon

    You offer your new employees no benefits, no path to a full-time career, and you treat them about as bad as a human being can be treated. Your inability to understand why you continue to lose good, hard-working people is simply baffling.

    Nov 30, 2020
  • anon

    Someone needs to sue the post office for violation of labor laws. I know a top notch labor attorney it might be time to call them.

    Nov 28, 2020
  • anon

    I'm a CCA in Ohio and I just had a panic attack this morning because I dread coming to my job. I'll probably end up quitting because of the unrealistic work load. It's slave labor. You want people to stay? Start treating us like human beings instead of a team of sled dogs. 40-48 for work weeks and 2 days off. Anything less than that and you'll have this problem forever.

    Nov 27, 2020
  • anon

    (Clerk position) Changing the pse/temp clerk job posting description to more accurately reflect the position. Many people come in hoping to be a window clerk as the job description focuses on and run when they realize it doesn't happen overnight. They do not realize the repetitive, often demanding, physical labor and long hours it entails. I think more people would be retained/the right fit for the positions found. For example a sturdy working introvert /&/or/ very energetic person who would excell at throwing parcels all day / taking around DPS / dispatch work might never apply because the job posting focuses on the description of a career clerk/pse114/window clerk and focuses on customer service. Just a small example. If this is ever seen-I hope it helps. More frequent 5 day weeks would be great too!

    Nov 14, 2020
  • anon

    I applied & was offered a temporary 360 MHA I did the finger prints in a Brooklyn location and they very nasty with & spoke to use like dirt I did orientation online and the next day I was placed in a queens location they had no work for us the first & second on the second day I was told it a “holiday MHA and they had no idea” which is a lie cause i finally got my package they sent out to me which I was suppose to bring it on the first day but it was in my mailbox the second day after I got off the label on it was “holiday employee” . They’re a scam they do it that way cause no one wants to work for the holidays with them smfh it’s false advertising. Simone really needs to help the employees there because the way they’re is not it in human

    Nov 09, 2020
  • anon

    After it taking months to get hired on, my daughter started working at nearby sorting facility. Thought she would have a 10-hour day, when she arrived for first regular work day at 6pm was told she'd be working, standing in a small confined area, for 12-hours. Every day. Six to seven days a week. (!!!!!!) That's insane. Mail shoots out of machine, grab, put in box, grab, put in box, grab, put in box, put box on the line, grab more mail, put in box, grab, put in box. For TWELVE HOURS?! Even though it took her months to get in, and she was super excited to have a position with the prestigious United States Postal Service, I do not think she will be going in for day two.

    Oct 30, 2020
  • anon

    I was a seasonal mail handler last November 2019 to early January 2020. Despite my age, I made it through the gauntlet of parcel and letter chaos at the top of my group and was told by my supervisor that I was his number one pick for a 360 MHA or equivalent position. But then when that position materialized about five months later my application was rejected. I didn't even receive an interview. Luckily I was in a temporary lay-off due to COVID-19 at another job that soon resumed. This season I was offered and accepted both an MHA and PSE 360-day term at another plant, but the hiring manager is pigeonholing me into a seasonal 90-day term as an MHA at a lower pay rate. I only accepted the position because it was 360-day and could have taken my previous holiday job with a dollar pay raise. I decided instead to take the PSE, due to my experience last year helping with practically everything at a very large, major plant. Despite my efforts, I am still stuck in the seasonal MHA. I feel that I am being suckered. The only good thing recently is that I was able to take the custodial exam for positions reserved for Veterans. My advice to USPS is to try caring about their holiday help. Once the economy recovers, they will not be able to find many people willing to endure abuse and terrible working hours for meager pay and no benefits.

    Oct 19, 2020
  • anon

    Realise that these folks can only stand so much physical demand. The long hours takes its toll on the human body. After 10hrs workers think they are done, then they get back to be sent out again with 20 more pkgs. Workers ate feeling unappreciated, tired and abused. So they quit. Give them more incentive. Treat them better, Don’t send them back out after a 10-12 hr day. They may just stay around longer. They are losing good, quality, hardworking people.

    Oct 19, 2020
  • anon

    As a new CCA that has held a few jobs over the years some for over 20 years I have some comments on the high CCA turnover rate. First the academy then three day training period was good but hardly sufficient. There needs to be much more. Never having seen what right looks like and then being asked to somehow figure it out on your own is ridiculous. The stress of not knowing the job and just getting pushed out there to deliver mail is daunting to almost anyone. Every other CCA I've spoken with and many regulars say that the first year or so really is terrible. It's actually torture, failing almost every day is not a way to keep employees. If I was younger and not had difficult jobs in the past I would have quit too. Why does the management put up with a 38.5% turnover rate when the national average is around 17%. There must be a way to make the job not suck so much in the first year. It does suck in the first year.

    Sep 12, 2020
  • anon

    Stop lying to people in the job description, making it seem like it’s part time and you may not get 40 hours. Don’t call Cca’s the help but We carry more than regulars. Don’t try to make carriers efficient if everything else about usps is inefficient the routes, mail boxes 40 ft from sidewalk right next to door, mail coming late, parcels late, and then push carriers to be efficient. Need to cut out most of upper management, don’t manipulate mail and stop not counting time when carriers are walking up to the driveway to housewhen routes are being counted to make routes seem shorter. All just backfire on post office. And that’s what’s happening, route manipulation, unfair working standards, and just dishonesty all around. Treat your employees right and everything else will fall in place. Regular 8 hour days, 2 days off occasional overtime. Split over time with all carriers that can carry overtime, instead of piling it on a group. More seniority less over time. But no carrier should have to carry 1.5 routes.

    Sep 06, 2020
  • anon

    The CCA program is legalized slavery.

    Aug 29, 2020
  • anon

    The CCA program is legalized slavery. What corporation would get away with working "part-time" employees like dogs? What firm would get away with working "part-time" employees more than full-time employees? CCAs always get the worst days off (usually a Tuesday or Wednesday). Managers overload CCAs with pivots and overburdened routes and call and harass them on their personal cell phones. Managers have unrealistic expectations for subs. A sub should only have to carry one route, not carry an entire office of entitled sloths. The CCA program is flat out abuse and should not be legal in 2020. The majority of CCAs are at least looking at 2-3 years of hazing just to obtain a mediocre job that only pays a few dollars above minimum wage in most metro regions.

    Aug 29, 2020
  • anon

    I have worked as a CCA for 33 months in Louisiana and it has been a rough 33 months since day one I have been working long hours and hard minutes. The CCAS due twice the work load and get treated with no respect we have senior carriers who carry half there route and drop the rest for the CCAs to carry. Then after all that you are told you are not doing it fast enough or what took you so long. No managers leave the desk long enough to help assist or guide you in the right direction there to busy eating and entertaining mess. This is a toxic environment and what makes things worse you have no ideal when your going to make career. Why have things in the contract that is not being followed no one wants to be non-career for years working 6 days a week 70 hours and now pushing for 7 days because of the recent increase in amazon packages. So now 7 days a week 10-12 hours a day talked down on and treated like your nothing because of you current title not because of your work ethics just because your a CCA. It seems to me the Post Office is getting its max dollar out of the CCAS who are held to this high standard told to follow all rules and regulations to the T. Now when its time for these CCAS to convert to career status someone is not doing there job! This is a major problem throughout the Post office on being fair and just with non-career workers, being told be patient your time is coming is not enough. Being told you will be converted in a certain time frame should be upheld just like the hold us to these times on a daily bases. Holding people back to keep a certain number of non-career workers to work long hours to benefit the Postal service because the regulars or either not there or not productive when they are. We need to stick to the contacts not sometimes but all the time just like they stick to there times pushing the CCAS with these times!

    Jul 21, 2020
  • anon

    why the USPS has a high turn over is by design. It tests how you take pressure. If they wanted to keep people, they would just split up the same routes over and over until the new employee learns the route. But to keep salary down they throw the new employees on different routes every day to confuse and frustrate the new employees until they quit. It's cheaper then working a journeyman courier at max wages. They can hire two people for the price of one journeyman courier.

    Jul 11, 2020
  • anon

    Working as a Holiday Casual was a great introduction to how USPS operates. I did find it unfair that overtime is only paid after you have worked 40 hours. Many days of 10 to 12 hours were the norm, and expected. To not pay a penny in overtime after 8 hours of intense labor is a shameful policy.

    Jul 08, 2020
  • anon

    My name is Caron Brownlee, an Assistant Rural Carrier at the Antioch Post Office on West Tregallas Road. I am also a soon-to-be retired high school teacher who has a deep appreciation for the USPS and has always wanted to be a mail carrier. However, I'm concerned about the lack of effective leadership I have witnessed as of late within the USPS, especially since it has been rightfully declared an "essential" service during this current global crisis. Had I known of the direction, or lack thereof, that the USPS would take in response to this momentous time in history, I would not have applied for this job. I'll list some of the things that have surprised me thus far: 1) Mandating that people work 11.5 hours the morning they arrive at what they assumed would be a regular work day, doing what they were primarily hired to do, deliver packages, not also throw/sort them. These long days could be tremendously truncated if a) more people were temporarily hired to throw the mountains of parcels (Training is minimal) and b) there was greater emphasis on how to organize, streamline, and sort the packages in a more systematic manner. I see so many wasted pivot points that would make the work day be more productive, be it by using more wrist scanners vs having masses of folks fighting for space under the one big scanner; or having someone scan then another one throw; or using pallets to move several boxes vs. doing it one-by-one, etc. Expecting carriers to stay until the very last parcel is thrown, yet not taking the time to plan a methodical way in which to do so, is hard on us physically, mentally, and emotionally. This is not sustainable and will negatively impact the mission of the USPS to safely and efficiently deliver the mail. 2) The lack of easy and effective ways to show appreciation as a way to motivate "essential" workers. I'm still shocked that people who have gone through a costly USPS training are not given any sort of "bling" (Hat, shirt, mug, etc.) as a way to promote the brand and encourage people to stick around. Even less-trained Amazon workers don a company outfit as they drive around in their air-conditioned Mercedes vans. How about occasional snacks in the break room, especially on days mandated to work OT or on holidays like July 4th, Father's Day, Memorial Day, etc? These simple and kind gestures would greatly boost morale; thus, productivity. 3) The missed opportunities to build a professional and proud community. There should be more meaningful Stand-Ups by either reading motivational quotes, celebrating small victories, expressing appreciation, or sharing positive news stories about how the USPS has literally and metaphorically "delivered" during this pandemic. If I were to ever lead a training, I would compile a montage of video/music clips celebrating the mail carrier/USPS. If I were to ever manage a post office, I would have a Spotify playlist of songs that celebrate anything mail related piped through a sound system and my displays would include PenPal memorabilia, be it postcards, old letters, vintage pics of mail carriers throughout the years, etc. With all the current delivery competition (Amazon, UPS, FedEx, etc.) and Trump’s persistent threat to its very existence, the USPS really needs to tend to its in-house and public relations or it will definitely not thrive (or maybe even exist!) in the 21st century. Oh, and for the kids who always LOVE to say hey to their Mail Carrier...how about "I love the USPS!" stickers or little toy mail trucks to give to our biggest little fans? Cost would be minimal for such joyful community outreach. 4) Just like the field of public education relies on a long list of "Substitute Teachers" to help fill the gaps, the USPS would greatly benefit from such a list. When I looked into job opportunities with the USPS, I was shocked to see that the only positions offered were "All or Nothings", the former being an overworked CCA or RCA or the latter being an ARC for Sunday delivery only. This is not conducive and leads to burnout as the same people are having to work long consecutive days. Meanwhile, there are people like me, teachers with summers and holidays off, that could come in to help during heavy volume periods or when in need of some supplemental income. It's a win-win! I’ll end my well-intended rant with a syllogism: Things that are essential need to be respected and protected. The USPS has been deemed essential. Therefore, the USPS worker needs to be respected and protected. In Solidarity, Caron

    Jul 05, 2020
  • anon

    Why not do a segment on the RMPO PM that are treated unfairly

    Jun 29, 2020
  • anon

    The reason you have no retention is because you have no management or supervisors that actually assist the new employees. They are thrown into a group of career carriers, and they are put thru hell. No help just insulting ,backstabbing, lying bunch of employees. To add to it the supervisors help these mean employees. No encouragement, no help, no where to get help. Oh you can go online but the hostile environment continues. You really want to see how it is put on a RCA outfit act as a new employee see how your treated for 30 days. See if your still there. Or have your check short and it takes 6 months to have it corrected.

    Jun 25, 2020
  • anon

    My husband has been working as a non-career postal worker for the last several weeks and has been overworked with 12 hour days! Didn't have a day off for 13 days and has no set schedule and therefore never knows when he will get a day off. How can USPS work someone like that and not give them benefits and then be surprised if they leave? If USPS wants to retain employees, they should practice fair labor laws and not overwork them. Who can keep up with that pace?

    Jun 22, 2020
  • anon

    Hiring non-career employees is not cost effective for the postal service. Non career employees are not treated equally, fairly by other career employees and supervisors. If the postal service wants to eliminate high turnover convert all MHA’s CCA’s and PSE’s to regular employees after 90 days vs. two of three years or service. Human resources should post on the website non career employees work 6 to 7 days per week with one or no off days and expected to work up to 10- and 12-hour days. This practice is physically and mentally draining leading to injuries. If a non-career employee is injured on the job the supervisor will terminate employment. This practice of hiring non career employees is not a fair business practice and model.

    Jun 11, 2020
  • anon

    I am not nor have ever been an USPS employee. - . 1. Look at improving their working conditions. - . 2. Look at incentive options/awards for non-career employees who are working for less than career employees when considering benefits. - . 3. Consider giving them a "benefit" card that can be used for drinks or snacks in the break room. Value does not have to be high. For example, one(1) or two(2) item equivalents per day. - . 4. Bonus for working all of their monthly scheduled shifts plus willingness to cover additional shifts/routes if they are part-time employees. - . 5. Most importantly have PMs that care about their staff. Consider the staff as "partners" to getting a job done. You need PMs that do not just "glorify themselves" at the expense of their staff - taking credit for all of the positive, exceptional items accomplished and blaming the staff for something that unexpectedly/planned that went wrong. - . 6. I worked for both kinds - not in the USPS. Throughout my working career, I worked for many POSITIVE Managers/Supervisors and we worked for the benefit of the organization(s) and that made me want to do my best all of the time because I was considered an Equal. I enjoyed the respect and they enjoyed my accomplishments. - . 7.I had one (1) manager (who brown nosed himself from a custodian) who always tried to set me up to fail on task after task. Everyone knew about it in the department and elsewhere. I never failed to accomplish any given task. One task he gave me related to an outside organization he expected me to fail on since I had no experience with the topic - neither did he. - . During working with the outside organization, I received several positive kudos for accomplishments and suggested courses of action that were appreciated and executed. - . When the closeout meeting came, he told me "do not go." He heard that what I performed was very successful and appreciated. At the close-out meeting, needless to say, it was all he that accomplished a task that no one else wanted to be involved with. Comments from others at the meeting were that he was gloating over HIS accomplishments. I never even received "a nice job" comment. - . The outside organization sent a letter to the CEO and me thanking the organization and me for the excellent results of the project. My manager was cc'd. - . Not a nice person to work for. He fired people who were experts in their field and would hire someone who knew almost nothing about the job so he could be "more knowledgeable" about the duties of a position. He also practiced nepotism in a deceitful way. 8. Train your PMs and other management personnel to be co-workers and consider each other's needs respectfully. - . REMEMBER: I am not nor have ever been an USPS employee. - . Just trying to help. - However, someone probably has a reason for doing none of the above. I would like to get a reply with your (whomever that may be) comments. - . Best wishes to all.

    Jun 09, 2020
  • anon

    I have been working as a PSE for four years and am waiting to become career. I have become the jack of all trades at the post office where I work out of necessity. I have done numerous maintenance type projects consistently the entire time I’ve been here. I am not lying when I say I have turned the place around. The office was insect infested and filthy when I walked in the door that first day. I was not allowed additional paid hours to get things in shape. I work by myself in a small office which is a challenging way to learn. Despite the small office not having much revenue there are the same daily duties needing done yet all I hear is from my PM is how little it makes and how the cleaning hours should be given to his office instead. I am a clerk yet do many jobs that others get paid much more for. If only I felt appreciated. Making a PM bring us something for appreciation is like a kick in the teeth when you know you aren’t appreciated. I am wearing down and wearing out. The emails we have to sift through daily could be more limited. The social emails showing baby pictures, prayer requests, peoples surgeries, illnesses and deaths could maybe be on another optional list. It is draining to have to go through these to find the more important work emails . Hard to keep up with all the hats one has to wear in these small offices.

    Jun 09, 2020
  • anon

    Here in Pittsburgh mvs we also have a high turnover rate and even with career employees just last year two with nineteen years of service quit one with five could not get along with manager and several ptfs also just left new drivers don’t want to deal with the issues here

    May 20, 2020
  • anon

    I worked as an RCA , I loved my job and was extremely good at it as well. I would come in early to help throw packages while also running a route that day and would do my best to have no errors. I made sure to be there when I was scheduled and Be available whenever I was needed. However any time I would ask for a day off or to not work that day, Some how some way I would always be called in, I would schedule VA appointments and I would have to come into work, leave and go to my appointment and then finish the route or be forced to cancel my appointment. I would be told that if I couldn’t make myself more available which in all honesty I was every day of the week except when I would ask off for those days, that the post master would find somebody that could. I understand that people call in and it’s my job to cover, but I was always the one to be called. We had other RCA’s that would just be off because they said no, but if I said I was unable to come in it was not acceptable. Also certain regulars were allowed to work whatever hours they wanted to and get away with a lot of things that didn’t sit right with me and a few other employees. The post master just didn’t seem to care seeing he would come into work around 11AM sometimes later. When I first started I loved my job and was treated with respect, however over time I just became a body to him and not an employee. I had my check have hours missing multiple times and that was addressed or never fixed.

    May 14, 2020
  • anon

    Another huge factor in RCA turnover is the requirement to purchase a vehicle for delivery. Because these right hand drive (rhd) vehicles are hard to find they are sold at rates much higher than a similar non rhd! When your wages are low and hours inconsistent this is a major purchase. I believe providing postal vehicles for all carriers would improve turnover statistics.

    May 08, 2020
  • anon

    Why not do an “Undercover Boss” study and find out 1st hand?

    Apr 29, 2020
  • anon

    First, I'll address the lackluster management as it owns the most impact. Leaders in the military regularly receive leadership training - it's continuous. Managers in the post office receive on-the-job training for technical aspects and nothing more. By and large, they served as a carrier or clerk and no longer want to perform that function. I have found that they take advantage of new personnel by ordering them to do things not in their contact, knowing the employee knows no better. Further, they avoid work at all costs, even if this beans forcing employees to work overtime. Career employees are also permitted to not only do their job in nearly whatever manner suits them, but they can also set up their case however they'd like. They are commonly spoiled children who throw tantrums if things aren't done their way all the time. I cannot believe a government organization gives employees such freedom, because it makes a substitute carrier's ability to perform their duties difficult even when in the same office. The training program for carriers also focuses very little on carrying mail. When you "graduate" from academy, you are certainly not prepared to carry mail. This is learned at your home station, but probably inconsistently due to your hours as a substitute carrier. When you first carry mail, it's a completely foreign and overwhelming experience - no wonder people leave loaded vehicles and quit. The path to becoming a career employee is also an absolute uncertainty. You could be a substitute carrier for decades and never become a career employee. During this time you are putting nothing toward retirement. Extend the probationary period to one year and offer a career position at that point. Contribute to their retirement based on hours worked. Give us a reason to stay. Adjust the wages according to the area in which we live. Why would we carry mail for 17 dollars an hour in the heat and cold if we could stock shelves at target for a similar rate? Take the exit surveys seriously across the board. There problems will not go away. We want to help but have very few reasons to stay.

    Apr 28, 2020
  • anon

    I think you’re in denial about how this all works. Since this country stupidly tied health insurance to employment, benefits are literally what hold most people to jobs. You say YOU want flexibility by hiring people you can easily get rid of, reduce hours, etc., but then you complain about turnover when they flexibly move on to other jobs that likely pay better/offer benefits. So either offer basic benefits for these ppl or quit whining about turnover.

    Apr 27, 2020
  • anon

    Amen sister

    Dec 01, 2020
  • anon

    It’s a corrupt system where the post masters get bonuses if they spend the least and cut clerk positions. There mantra is work faster so we can eliminate your position. Some even work off the clock just to keep up with the high demand load and short staff and impossible demands. Postmasters can lie to upper management and blame stealing or Postmasters delivering of packages on clerks and they just believe what they say. Postmasters in level 18s can work 15 hrs of clerk hrs and give a clerk only 20 hrs. And some postmasters work 20 hrs and only report 15. Who’s watching postmasters? No one. That’s how they get away with it. There is no witnesses because of fear of retaliation. The environment is hostile to the workers because PM don’t care. USPS goal is to create a sea of PTFS and get rid of all regular clerk positions when they retire. They are also purposely being mean to get workers to retire sooner or quit. That’s what they want. Who wants to work for someone that treats you like crap every day. Especially the Micromanager postmasters that relentlessly harass clerks all day at work. Or set up scenarios to purposely instigate someone so when they react, they can write them up. And fire them without just cause. Trust me, it’s their goal to cut the deficit. that’s why OIG is doing nothing. If you don’t act like their pet, they act like tyrants. Don’t they know that positive motivation boosts moral. Who wants to work harder and faster so their job can be eliminated and the boss gets a raise for the clerks commendable performance. It makes us want to work slower. Too many chiefs and not enough Indians. Also the postmasters disappear and leave you alone at the busiest times of day or hide or are on their phones all day chatting it up where you can’t even get there help w a customer problem. Now trump wants to take all our jobs away. It’s all about power money and greed.

    Apr 25, 2020
  • anon

    I am truly trying to be engaging here and not sarcastic but to me the answer to this question is obvious and in the term itself. A non-career employee is just that “non career” they are going into the job either as temporary. Assuming someone households would obtain a job at Usps as a short term solution to a financial downturn or another sudden event. And for the other employees who obtain work at usps for the long term and don’t get full Career or benefit eligible employee status they are only staying as a hope they obtain it. When this doesn’t happen they leave because a moderate living in today’s economy requires more than the all encompassing salary of the non career empLoyee makes. The lack of benefits and lower compensation is the postal offices way of showing they consider them to be less valuable and therefor more likely to be temporary. The 8 billion dollars (Claimed) to be saved annually by USPS For hiring temp workers are just 8 billion reasons to leave when the going gets tough or their patience runs out and they are forced to leave to seek out a career. Again, the answer Is simple and this question is taking up time from people like yourself and the resources spent pondering this, the obvious, can be better spent on your employees who are underpaid. Please understand, I am a (covid-19) furloughed retail employee seeking potential employment with the USPS and as someone who would be willing to retain employment for the long term (i.e less turnover) I am turned away by the idea of position where I am not treated or considered to be as valuable as the value I’m willing to put into the job. Or as valuable as a benefit eligible equally compensated employee. Thank you for reaching out on your site like this and I appreciate you taking the time to read this, Joshua Uptain 85268

    Apr 25, 2020
  • anon

    Why is Usps allowing Pm’s to put CCA’s in 204b positions as soon as they hit their 90 days? While many are clueless nepotism hires, all are lazy clueless yes-men-and-women. In our area the CCA’s are not fingerprinted and background checked until they are finally making FTR, which in most cases is after several years. Yet, they have access to all of our personal information and pay. They are not being trained properly, only told what to do, when and who to do it to. We’ve had dozens and dozens of LLV gas cards and arrow keys disappear. They throw away mail, steal parcels, sexually harass us, verbally abuse us, spread rumiors and lies to cover their other rumors and lies; and think this is how the Usps is supposed to run since they don’t know any better. And the resentment from CCA’s being screamed at and threatened by a CCA that they were hired with, makes the good CCA’s quit. CCA’s should never be 204b’s. As with District positions, only employees with at least one year of CAREER service should eligible for any kind of supervisor or manager position. Fixing the corrupt management is the only way to fix the Usps and keep good employees.

    Apr 16, 2020
  • anon

    Worst management in postal history. The “who-you-knows” have taken over from the “what-you-knows”. And the “who-you-know” good ole boys club have committed rampant nepotism hires of all their family and friends. Then when those clueless nepotism hires hit their 90 days employment, they are put in positions they didn’t earn or deserve, weren’t in any way qualified for, and ahead of FTR qualified employees. Mgmt doesn’t file the required forms to show them in those positions, instead hand entering their time. Mgmt is narcissistic, egotistical, raging control freaks and now they “own” their 204b nepotism hired family and friends who aren’t trained and do whatever they’re told to do. They are told to only care about the numbers, while having no clue how to attain them. Screaming yelling cursing accusing threatening the clerks and carriers is now SOP, every hour of every day. They screw with employee hours and pay, won’t work cca’s/pse’s who speak out, and retaliate against all clerks/carriers who stand up to the verbal/physical abuse and file grievances. Filing OIG complaints has fallen on deaf ears, as the narcissistic PM’s lie and pull the local OIG’s into their circle of friends. This, creating extremely bias opinions to all complaints, and even giving mgmt advance warning of employee complaints, giving them time to cover up their illegal behavior. So why should cca’s/pse’s stay at Usps and keep getting assaulted by idiot 204b’s/mgmt, when they can go to UPS, FEDEX and Amazon or literally anywhere else and get treated better. Until the OIG actually holds mgmt accountable, nothing will change, excessive unnecessary OT will continue to be paid out, and turn-over will remain high. Oh, and then there’s the rampant sexual harassment that gets the victims punished and 204b’s/mgmt gets away with it and continues their illegal behaviors.

    Apr 12, 2020
  • anon

    Reduce the workload!!! Walking a full route (15 miles), just to get back and be told to grab another 8 mile walking push works fine for a day. But not three or four or 25 in a row. Treat non-career employees with respect! Stop talking down to us as if we are expendable. Stop asking us to do more than the career employees and in less time! Do this full (evaluated) route, plus this 45 minutes of the auxiliary route. And be back early for another push. Really? And if you aren't back early, you will be written up for being slow. REALLY?!?!?

    Apr 04, 2020
  • anon

    The management is the reason that the lost office is in trouble. They set heartless, and ride people. They don't encourage, and they don't offer you assistance on long days.

    Mar 29, 2020
  • anon

    There is no courier in my community. How can one become a courier? I need your advice. Thank you

    Mar 20, 2020
  • anon

    650 mail boxes , 150 parcels of every size....this is the start of turn-over. WHO is going to work like a dog for $18 hour?? NO bathroom on route. NO food/drink because both hands are full of mail/parcels/scanner. And then get yelled at for not being done by 6pm??? C_R_A_Z_Y town. When I started there was 200 mail boxes, ZERO parcels/no scanners. The route is exactly same 20 miles BUT now 650 boxes. AND the new carriers need to use THEIR OWN CAR. Who has a "beater" ??? no one. Alot of people lease and they cannot take chance of damage. OH< and what insurance company is going to cover you /your car car/ the other driver, when an accident happens on the route ??? We can only hire those who have a car to wreck, not someone who doesnt have a car and has great work ethics, etc. AND NOT ONE new mail truck has been built and most of our fleet are 25 yrs old.

    Mar 12, 2020
  • anon

    I'm a pse and waiting for a career position. Its hard when you know that some ppl are there to just be a body at work and don't care about moving up. I am wanting to move up and am dedicated to my job and I have to wait til something comes up and that still depends on senority.

    Mar 11, 2020
  • anon

    I won't go into the issues of abusive management, I believe the other commenters took care of that already, but I will address another issue- The hiring process. I did a lot of hiring work for the Philadelphia District a few years back. The biggest issue we had was where the candidates lived in relation to the jobs they were applying to. When we would post a job, people from the city of Philadelphia would apply for positions 50 miles away. We are forced to hire them because they said they can drive to the job, but when the first snowstorm hits, or they get tired of driving they quit. Would you want to work a job that has no benefits 50 miles away when you are spending half you paycheck on gas? Make it a requirement that the candidates must visit the offices that they are applying to so they know what the drive is like.

    Mar 10, 2020
  • anon

    I would like to think that they should b able to shadow before actually putting money into someone that isnt willing to put forth the work ethic we need... Its not a job for just anyone ...you have to b willing to sacrifice and maintain many different types of conditions ..

    Mar 09, 2020
  • anon

    Every single manager should be taught the basics of what the brilliant Dale Carnegie wrote. HOW TO WIN FRIENDS AND INFLUENCE PEOPLE! These are the basic skills folks!

    Mar 04, 2020
  • anon

    The problem is that the people in charge think they know everything. Their ego’s are so inflated and frail, if anyone dares to make a suggestion or question a decision, they explode. Also, as in our city, they all have “dirt” on each other and threaten to use it if they don’t get whatever they want. It’s past time for a “Wells Fargo type cleanse”.

    Apr 16, 2020

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