Processing packages from abroad, especially into the U.S. Postal Service’s JFK International Service Center in New York City, can be a challenge.

Based on the volume, the Postal Service approved $32 million in 2017 to buy a second High Throughput Package Sorter (HTPS) and install it at the Queens, NY, Processing and Distribution Center (P&DC). (The first HTPS the Postal Service bought is in Denver.) The expectation was that an HTPS at the Queens P&DC would save transportation costs of $131 million over 11 years, starting in fiscal year (FY) 2018, by eliminating trips to processing sites located outside the Queens district that had sufficient processing capacity.

Our recent audit report indicates the HTPS machine at the Queens P&DC did not meet its performance and functionality goals and thus achieved only half the $8 million in transportation savings projected for FY 2018.

Why the shortfall? About 17 percent of the machine’s trays were occupied with recirculating packages – a delay that occurs when the sorter can’t read the address on the package. When that happens, the HTPS sends an electronic image to a remote center where an employee electronically sends back the correct information to the HTPS so that the package can be sorted. But if that doesn’t work, the package can circulate on the sorter up to three times before it is rejected, which lowers throughput (number of packages processed through the machine divided by the number of hours the machine is in use).

We recommended management develop a plan to reduce the number of packages recirculated or rejected by the Queens HTPS machine to achieve daily volume and throughput goals.

Do you have any thoughts on how the Postal Service could reduce recirculating or rejected packages on the HTPS? How often do you send or receive international packages?

Comments (7)

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  • anon

    USPS scanning packages is not done at some facilities. i have multiple packages shipped from one location and none of them get a status scan until they arrive at the destination.

    Jun 20, 2019
  • anon

    Instead of trying to load the machines to fast load it slower and make sure that all labels are facing the cameras so they can be read the first time . Management is always concerned about numbers and not the efficiency of the run .Use more people to make sure the packages are facing the right direction.

    Jun 05, 2019
  • anon

    Those look like the same trays the spss uses which are made with Steel. ISC mail have a lot of magnets which stick to the Steel. The induction stations need to have a steel plate installed to cull out the magnets.

    Jun 05, 2019
  • anon

    Any no read should cause the parcel to reject. This would give the label image time for round-trip to/from REC site. The parcel could then be reintroduced into the mail stream at which time it would be given ONE revolution to sort properly before being rejected again and manually sorted...

    Jun 05, 2019
  • anon

    How about having other places from originating place correct the address before it gets to our country. This may force the source to invest in future advancements....

    Jun 04, 2019
  • anon

    Standardise requirement for international mailing across the board. With the progress that has been made with modernization of labeling

    Jun 04, 2019
  • anon

    Require customers to use preprinted label's. With clear readable font and barcode that the machine would look for and then read...

    Jun 04, 2019