• Project Title:
  • Effectiveness of Postal Service Efforts to Reduce Non-Career Employee Turnover
  • Start Date:
  • Tuesday, February 12, 2019
  • Estimated Report Release Date:
  • August 2019

The Postal Service hires non-career employees and temporary employees to supplement its regular workforce to help reduce staffing costs. The non-career employees earn lower wages than full time staff. The turnover rate of non-career employees is higher than the Postal Service wants. Reducing non-career employee turnover decreases the cost of hiring and training new employees, and lessens the related job-performance impact. Although non-career employee turnover cannot always be avoided, the root causes should be understood and addressed where possible. 

We are conducting this audit to assess the Postal Service’s effectiveness in reducing non-career employee turnover and evaluating the underlying reasons for non-career turnover. 

  • What do you think are the underlying reasons for non-career employees leaving the Postal Service?
  • What should the Postal Service be doing to help retain non-career employees?
  • What impacts have you seen in the Postal Service workplace as a result of non-career employee turnover? 

Comments (294)

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  • anon

    After 25 years, as a pmr, still no benefits , for retirement.... too much disparity between career and non- career.... should be a promotional system for non- career to work towards....

    Aug 14, 2019
  • anon

    Do away with probation. Some people are slower than others but they'll get better with time and you've invested a lot of time and money in a new-hire

    Aug 14, 2019
  • anon

    Great blog. Thanks for sharing your views about this.

    Aug 14, 2019
  • anon

    Abuse. I work from 7-4 on a route and then come back. I then put all my stuff away and do my time and leave. I go to my car after saying my goodbyes...and along with four other people leaving at the same time as me we are all going out of the parking lot, but suddenly...I'm singled out to come back and deliver parcels. Ridiculous. Wouldn’t mind taking them if they told me as soon as I got there or before I got back so I could just prepare. Hours. You can’t tell me that one day a week isn’t a huge problem for people. Oh but you get 2 if you have Sundays. How much longer? But when we don’t get work and we have to feed our families it goes a little different, then suddenly you work and you are expected to do everything regardless of what it is when you get the hang of it which is fine up to a certain point. Peak season is fine as it makes sense, but when in February, the slow season, when someone tells me I have to be there at 7 to do a route, finish and then a parcel run, and then when I get done go do collections, and then close...at 8:30 I think its reasonable to become a little angry when all of those things should be designated to one person each. Frustration of equipment. I don’t care about the LLV as much as others. I am fine with it. It’s the scanners, the keys, and the NBUs that are horrible. The Scanners just freeze maybe 5 times in a day. It takes 5 mins to reboot them after getting them to finally shut off. 20-25 mins doing that…almost 30 mins a day just on scanner issues. Keys: Fragile and sometimes unable to open the parcel lockers as they are old and worn. NBUs or CBUs. Completely trashed NBUs with no fix in sight. Only when someone breaks into them will they replace them. Some slam shut because of the pitch they were placed on the cement and you have to hold them open…smashing your hands and arms against them all the while. The metal ones are nice but the hinges are not…they break way too easily. This causes more and more and more delays. I wish I could say that I rush as an RCA to get done early and then go home, but more often than not I am slowing down to keep from having to go out and work more when I am done because it becomes apparent that every time I come back I don’t get to go home after doing my route. The worst thing is the schedule. I understand that RCAs are subs. When I see on the schedules (3 of them) that I am working monday-sunday and have to verbally tell the supervisor...hey I worked 8 days...to have them begrudgingly give me a day off and then learn that my 98 hours on my paycheck is reduced because I went over on overtime and now they are going to reduce my time is outrageous. I think for the most part, I love doing the job. Carrying is good. Collections is good, and parcel runs are good separately. But when all of them come at me in one day because they had to give 4 people off because they worked them 10 days in a row each...that becomes an issue. Far worse is when you have 10 people that just didn’t come in that day because they are too new but could easily get experience. If they just came in, because all they’re getting is one day a week anyways it’s ridiculous. If I could have a schedule that didn’t become Swiss cheese by the end of the week and inked up in pen because of changes and then get called in on my scheduled days off when I booked time for an appointment to my doctor and then came in for 3 hours to do collections only to be told I suck at the end of the day because I wasn’t fast enough and then am told that my next scheduled day off would also be revoked and forced to work a route I hadn’t done with no help I think I would be fine, If they had people there that were able to fill all of the necessary roles and do all of the things they had to do then we wouldn’t be completely overwhelmed. Those that are new will work 4 days a month and those that have gotten the hang of it will work 26. Im sure there is a way to have someone work 20…and let me have a day off every once in a while, but it wont be any time soon. Why is turnover so high? The new guys constantly get told by my supervisor that they need to be better on their 2nd day. And that they shouldn’t rely on help on their 3rd. When I first started this was not an issue. My supervisor understood the impossible insurmountable mountain the new person was facing. They had to keep them from being too overwhelmed…and they did. Now? Case…get out at 12 and you are already being yelled at on your 3rd day. Good job guys you really know how to keep employees. For another thing…why not train longer. Not in the academy it was all useless. It’s the field training that needs to be longer. In fact. I would have 2 days of academy as all I did was talk about labels and rules. It was completely worthless and a waste of the post offices time. It was the field training and me constantly having to ask questions and having issues come up with trial and error (a lot) to do something wrong and then be corrected and realize it so I wouldn’t do it again…why not prevent that. Have the new person…may here is a thought…follow the carrier…get acquainted with the route instead of being holed up in the back of the truck taking space for parcels…and have them run parcels to the door and maybe do this more than 3 days…perhaps a month…since I was so scared I would be fired because I didn’t understand what I was doing for a whole month. Its idiotic that they cant be trained even if its just HALF of the route. Meet them in the morning case up with the carrier or case up for the carrier as you go and then take down and follow along with the carrier. Make them work until 2 and then cap it off and don’t pay them any more. They go home…they will get some time and it would only cost a fraction of the overall cost to the post office. It bothers me how quickly we were thrown to the wolves.

    Aug 14, 2019
  • anon

    I'm a new hire with the company, and the very first thing I was told was how short the training was. The classroom training, and academy was fine, but where I believe it is severely lacking, is the practical hands on training. More specifically, when we are sent to our stations to shadow the carrier who we will be subbing for. We are given 3 days to memorize an entire route and have it done by a specific time. We don't even have the cases memorized by then, and this entire job focuses on ones ability to remember which is different for everyone. Every job I've ever had at a minimum, did 1 month of shadowing / hands on, which should be plenty to have at least 1 route down. This would require having the regular carrier shadow the new hire, feeding him tips, and advice on how to do things, but does not directly help. This would create more confidence in new hires, rather than giving them 3 days, over half of which the carrier does most of the work. My very first thoughts coming in is "Oh it's one of those sink or swim jobs, where they just expect you to figure it out". In the long run it's not hard, but for new hires it's like learning a new language at first.

    Aug 14, 2019
  • anon

    Well now that the usps used temp employees to eliminate my fulltime position as a Postmaster and I quit after 18 yrs of dedicated service "Karma is a bitch"

    Aug 13, 2019
  • anon

    I applied for the "PSE SALES & SVCS/DISTRIBUTION ASSOCIATE" position during my phone interview I was told that I had to have full open availability from Monday-Saturday and that I was looking to get 26 hours at most and that some days I would just get 2 hours of work. I'm not a stay at home parent or a teenage kid looking for some extra money. I'm an adult with bills and responsibilities. It's ok to offer part time, but you need to offer the flexibility to have a second job or offer monetary compensation for being on call.

    Aug 13, 2019
  • anon

    I like the people, and the work. I'm a PSE Clerk, putting in my notice tomorrow. The 6-day weeks with 1-2 hrs of unpaid lunches and having to work alternating days/nights back-to-back are taking their toll, especially with no end in sight. I can't even take LWOP! If I ask for it, I get a "no" at worst, and 2 days off at best - ie, a weekend. I don't want to quit because I do really like it, but this is just not a sustainable way to work people. Apparently there is a "cap" or a "freeze" on hiring more PSEs, which is a horrible cycle to be stuck in. Overworking people because you are short-staffed, and they quit, meaning you need to work the remaining workers even harder, and then they quit, etc, etc. Just convert some people so our offices can hire more PSEs and run properly thanks to having adequate staffing. We have career employees working 6-day weeks it's so bad.

    Aug 12, 2019
  • anon

    I think the underlying reason for non-career employees leaving the post office is because of MANAGEMENT. Non career employees take a lot of abuse, treated with disgust, gossip, micromanagement, and the list goes on. It’s comes to a point where you the non-career employee start to question if your a good fit for the position because Management get to bend the truth to their will. Management really don’t accept any responsibility for ANYTHING. Management will do anything in there power to put the non-career employees or others in the position of the villain. It almost becomes a toxic relationship between employee and management. We get to be oblivious about what’s really going on with Management and sometimes the next best thing to do is leave. The Post office should really take a good look at the positions that are open but not on the books. Fill those positions and give the non-career employees a chance to grow and expand within the industry. A lot of non-career employees have credentials and experiences that’s being hindered from expanding and causing them to take their experiences elsewhere. On a local level, the non-career employees have been waiting to turn over 4+ years or more. All the while taking a lot of emotional, metal and in some cases physical abuse from Management. Other federal government agencies will have the non-career employee on a probationary period up to one year and then if every criteria is meet that employee would eventually be placed into that position. At the Post office it’s a different game plan. It’s survival of the fittest only the strong survive.

    Aug 11, 2019
  • anon

    Well, there is a reason why a finely tuned and operational unit is built from the ground up.

    Aug 10, 2019
  • anon

    From all the posts... Looks like you have a system wide managerial problem. A suggestion:....These posts have given you a roadmap... Wouldn't it be a good idea for you to take all of these comments and then come up with a plan. Post the plan for all the folks who have commented to see. Ask their opinion of your plan. Then do what they say... We keep seeing usps talking about stakeholder involvement (usually the big guys)....The folks who bothered to comment are your real stakeholders. Listen to them for a change...

    Aug 10, 2019
  • anon

    Watching RCA's come and go over the years....after hearing their complaints....I can list several reasons for the large turnover. 1. Needing affordable health benefits. 2. Sunday work days because most need at least one family day each week. There are those who see Sunday as a day devoted to religious beliefs. 3. Wages are not enough to cover the expense for providing private vehicles. The increase in package delivery means more miles, wear and tear, and increase maintenance expenses. 4. Longer days to meet package volume and the increase in stress, and pressure, make them seek other means of employment. 5. Working after dark....as the risk of accidents increase drastically because carriers cannot see clearly. Dog bites are increased as well....as the carrier cannot see as well and customers let their dogs out once they return home. Its upsetting to a lot of the population having someone pulling up their drive after dark which increases stress for carriers drastically. 6. Not having enough relief carriers in an office...thereby turning what was to be a part-time position into a full-time, over-time, job. 7. The pressure being applied to hurry, be 100% accurate, work longer days, sleep less, reduced family time, and now work Sundays. It would be to USPS's benefit to consider adding package runners to help the regular carrier. and the RCA's, during the crazy delivery days, especially during Christmas, and once the daylight hours are reduced. Most all employees count on definite quitting times....so as to spend time with family... and take care of personal health. Taking care of personal needs, and health, offers a much happier secure employee. USPS has been on a spinning cycle since acquiring all its package contracts as private vehicles offer limited capacity....thereby requiring multiple package trips after completing an entire Rural Route. Carriers are becoming tired, irritable, stressed, and their bodies hurt from excess wear and tear. It makes unhappy employees and they begin to question....is this really worth it??? They decide no....and move to something that offers definite starting and quitting times and a planned schedule. We are all creatures of habit and we all need to balance our careers as well as home life. I hope this offers insight. It would be great to maintain well-trained Relief Carriers as well as Regular Carriers. Our giant has been a bit off balance...floundering as it's trying to maintain stability. The rebalancing efforts affects the whole.

    Aug 10, 2019
  • anon

    The biggest reason for CCA turnover is the abuse by management. If you meets demands by over extending yourself they expect it everyday. The CCAs in South Florida are overworked and treated like slaves. The supervisor at my station rides around in his BMW and spies on carriers as they slave away. Unrealistic expectations and under timed routes are the cause for turnover. The supervisors expect newly minted CCAs to perform 12 hours worth of work in 8 hours. It's funny how they can overload you with pivots and say that it is only 30 mins worth of work. The LLV's in South Florida are around 115 degrees inside with 60% humidity. The entire job is a major health hazard.

    Aug 09, 2019
  • anon

    Non-career employees should be able to earn “career” status over a given time period, one or two years. It’s very unreasonable to expect anyone to work as a temp for ten years (or more, depending on who is retiring) in the hopes of someday getting benefits. It’s hard to raise a family without security and anyone who sticks with a non-career position for a couple of years ought to have proved themselves enough.

    Aug 09, 2019
  • anon

    I think some of the underlying reasons for non-career employee turnover are employees no longer expect to stay with a company for 30 years and don’t have the same commitment to the organization, nor do they see the opportunities the same way as employees saw in the past. Also, on boarding is watered down and expedited. Training is inadequate. With a goal to get new hires on the roles to meet cap, basically anyone with a pulse makes the cut and gets hired. Not carefully selecting candidates from the beginning leaves quite an opportunity for quick turnover. New employees are given a whirlwind orientation and training, and then get put on the job with high expectations and very little, if any, support to become successful. Often, all the safety training they get gets thrown out the window when they get their boots on the ground and find out that things run differently in the real world compared to what they learned in the classroom. They quickly adapt to how everyone does things when they get out to their offices, and, it’s no surprise that more than half of all accidents involve employees with less than 2 years of service. The answer to employees who have accidents within their probationary period is to fire them. Another reason for turnover, in my opinion, is poor management and supervision. Everyone complains about those “millenials” and while there are certainly differences in the generational workforce, managers cannot throw their hands up and cry millennial. Generational changes must be expected, and the USPS can no longer rely on its antiquated rank and file military style of management if it wants to compete with 21st century companies in this modern generation. Ruling by iron fist used to work, but that method is no longer accepted...and it certainly shows because people will leave, and go somewhere else before they put up with that kind of culture. Safety is touted as a core value, but I would argue that that’s not really true when you consider employees are expected to drive antiquated vehicles that Have little or no safety features and being operated almost 10 years beyond their expected lifespan. Vehicles can slip out of gear, break down often, and many have spontaneously combusted in recent years. I wouldn’t put my teenage son or daughter in an LLV, or any family member for that matter, so why would the USPS continue to allow employees to drive these trucks? Plant equipment is no better. GPMCs and other mail transportation equipment are in poor condition and are difficult to maneuver. Postal facilities are also poorly maintained and are generally very dirty. Many have leaking roofs and poorly maintained HVAC systems. What should the USPS be doing to help retain non career employees? Start by carefully selecting employees, give them a quality onboarding experience with more training...that’s ongoing thru the first year or two. I envision initial training with pass/fail elements to weed out employees that cannot demonstrate certain proficiencies, then OJI training with highly qualified and vetted OJI trainers who can continue with training consistent with the onboarding trainers, then coaching/mentoring sessions periodically over 12-24 months, and some periodic refresher training like quarterly or semiannual for the first 12-24 months to ensure the employee feels well-equipped to do the job. And speaking of equipment, employees should be provided adequate, safe equipment and tools to do their jobs. Anything less than that is failure on the part of the organization. During this “apprentice” period, managers need to be engaged with these employees...which means they need to be on the floor, on the street, involved, engaged...and off 50 million telecoms a day that rehash old news or everyone’s failures from the prior day as if that will somehow fix all the problems. No! The best way to make improvements is to get in the trenches with the people who do the work...the craft employees, and be servant leaders, not absent dictators who check boxes, pencil whip, certify, and rubber stamp things just to get off a witch-hunt non-compliance report driven from HQ through Area through district, through MPOO, through manager. Everyone is chasing the next level down trying to look better than the other “area” or “district” or “MPOO” or “manager” and the focus becomes the chase and has very little to do with what’s being chased. Before anyone has a chance to absorb what has to be chased, another proverbial rabbit is launched at the track, and off they go...areas, districts, Mpoos and managers...chasing the rabbit. So much time is wasted with these compliance chases, not to mention the duplication of efforts at every level of the organization who repeat the same messages over and over and over, pulling the same reports at their respective levels, and chasing the level below them...ad nauseam. What impacts have I seen as a result of this turnover. High-dangerously high-levels of stress - felt by new employees getting thrown into the ‘fire’ with overreaching high expectations to perform or be fired as well as EAS employees who work 12-15 hours a day or more as well as nights and weekends but can never keep up with the unrealistic demands placed upon them every day, Low morale, poor public perception of our organization, lower productivity, accidents, —-all of which equates to dollars by the millions flying right out the window. These impacts are huge...and the consequences of high employee turnover goes much deeper than just an ‘attrition’ issue.

    Aug 08, 2019
  • anon

    RCA didnt last 6 months. The route I was on had new houses being built daily. So with an extremely large route and just basically handed off with little training from the regular was pretty discouraging. Basically told sink or swim. No one really cares. Esp higher ups. People talk trash, make things up, share personal info. I wanted to work, not join the drama team. They call you with like 2 hours notice or less they need you to fill in. Great, if I didnt need a 1st job to supplement my 2nd job. Everyone wants to be in charge, even other subs. Not to mention I STILL have not been paid for eTravel, going on possibly 6 months now.

    Aug 07, 2019
  • anon

    I was new to rca started in liberty rd in Lexington KY, I went through the academy and everything work the next week doing my training, and when I got in the seatbelt was mess up. So they told me to go home and they will fix it and let me know. Then when it came to my pay day, I didn’t get anything. I contact and contact them and no reply’s so I drove down their and they told me they fix it and the seat belt. Then a month went by and all I got was 100 bucks for almost 60 hrs which I got the time card with their signature on it. I keep contacting them through email but they won’t respond and won’t answer phone and when I drive down their they say it be fix and we will get u back to work soon. They said it can take up to 8 weeks. Now it’s been 3 months and no pay still and haven’t work a day yet cause they still ain’t got the seatbelt fix. But I atleast just want my pay.

    Aug 07, 2019
  • anon

    I am a new RCA (less than a year); I was told new routes were to be added and my time would as RCA would be less than two years. So far there are 3 subs in front of me, one with 9 years as a sub. I do not receive benefits, get scolded by manager that I need to come in later... (and i take a little more time to case than the usual person because I am only there once a week); I need to obviously have another full time job but will randomly be called in to work at post office.. and not just for a day or so...it is for stretches of days at a time. For example my main carrier just told me yesterday he needs me for ANOTHER vacation for a week and a half for NEXT WEEK. No prior notifocation. I requested one Saturday off with discussion on working an extra day.to make up.for it, 4 MONTHS before the date and was given a hard time... its difficult because work place morale is low, no full time position with benefits in sight, and I am expected to drop everything with less than 24 hours notification. This effects the job that allows me to pay my bills and feed my kids; because this "only given one day a week for the next 3 plus years" isnt going to feed my children. This is why I feel discouraged. (I just want to say I have a good work ethic, which some have said is a problem. I regulary work 20 days straight between my two jobs... its exhausting with little reward or end in sight.)

    Aug 07, 2019
  • anon

    The RCA position is misrepresented as part time, yet often times RCAs are worked 6-7 days a week, basically full time (and then some) with NO accrual of vacation days, sick days, retirement benefits, etc. RCAs are not properly trained, thrown on routes without even ride alongs to help them learn the ins and outs of routes and idiosyncracies of carriers and customers, resulting in poor customer service. Now, with the latest contract ratification, they can be forced to work offices within 50 miles of their home office...overworking them instead of making managers responsible for sufficiently hiring, properly training and retaining their own employees. Retention may be assisted by doing away with The Academy and putting in place on-site trainers/mentors who will work with and alongside new hires until they are comfortable. Each rural office should have at least one loaner vehicle available - it is increasingly difficult to find new vehicles that can accommodate this job, much less the amount of packages we are now delivering.

    Aug 06, 2019
  • anon

    As a postmaster relief (PMR) and doing this because being disabled this work is good for me, I am rare indeed. Turnover I have seen, being considered a warm body to hold a place in job openings I have heard. I may get fired for this comment. That is OK. There in my thought too many pressures on postmasters, too little respect shared with any employee but especially with part timed. Career employees want to give all the bad hours casuals so that is is not reasonable nor nice. It is a problem with status usage. ON a final note, I saw something that may just hold the answer to all this top down pressure, a story on Forbes 5 nov 2017 about how USPS subsidizes China with cheap shipping, Could this be a saving grace for the USPS to disable deals that hurt our country?

    Aug 06, 2019
  • anon

    1: Scheduling is the primary reason I've witnessed a massive turn-over in my own NDC. Working 12 hours a day, 6 days a week doing physical labor takes a hard toll on the body and mind. It takes everything I have to not just quit each day. 2: Hire more employees and reduce the schedule to 10 hours or less. People's bodies need time to recover or you risk stress casualties. 3: Massive reduction in productivity. People are too fatigued to work how they want us to constantly and it damages daily mail output.

    Aug 06, 2019
  • anon

    Temporary employees leave the usps because... you already know why They are treated like filth by supervisors who are high on cocaine Yelled and screamed at Have thier pay stolen Blahblahblah

    Aug 05, 2019
  • anon

    The entire lack of holding people responsible for their actions, or lack there of. People whom slack, and don't actually do their job; even if a non-career, get more special treatment and treated as a 'warm body', rather than dealt with how they should be. Leaving the other workers to bust butt even more, to pick up the slack. You earn AL, but can't ever use it. Expected to be okay with constant schedule changes, working the max amount of hours, lack of training ,lack of communication between supervisors ,etc. A whole bunch of rules and procedures set by management and higher ups, which none are followed.

    Aug 04, 2019
  • anon

    Yes. Well said! Performance disparity is a serious concern. And our seniority-based system is entirely antiquated.

    Aug 06, 2019
  • anon

    Being an RCA we deal with a lot of bullying and harassment from the regular carriers. We are not created equally. The look at us as we are easily replaceable. If customers do not clean out their mail boxes, they blame us when it is full. When we put a parcel in a cluster box mail locker and the customer does not clean it out. We get yelled at by the regulars and are told to deliver it to their door so they can use the locker. We do the same job as a regular carrier at a much lower pay! We are short in our office so we are working 5-6 days a week plus doing Amazon Sundays. We go over 40 hours we now loose our evaluated time, now making our pay much lower than what it should be. When a regular carrier goes over 40 hours, it doesn’t matter they still get their evaluated pay. We are forced to split routes, but not a regular carrier. We have a post master that allows two of the RCAs only work Saturdays and Sundays leaving us constantly short. He allows the regular carriers to talk about the RCAs and bully us and does nothing about it. Auxiliary routes should be converted to full time routes but at a less rate of pay. RCAs have no reason to stay at the post office. There are no perks to the job. Sure work 90 days on a route as a hold down to start earning leave, but work 90 consecutive days, Monday thru Saturday on different routes, you earn nothing. The problem is that RCAs have nothing to work towards, no vacation days, no sick days, lowered pay to preform the same job, no thrift savings plan, NOTHING! Also..... no life, you need to be at the beckon call of the regulars, if they want a day off all they have to do is tell the boss and they get it! A paid day off because they earned it and an RCA earns nothing. The postal service needs to offer RCAs more!! A lot more than what they get now, which is less pay and grief.

    Aug 04, 2019
  • anon

    Underlying reason number 1: does not pay enough. 2. Poor management, including but not limited to.. mistreatment of employees, harassment, lack of leadership. 3. Not being paid when extra mileage is required.

    Aug 04, 2019
  • anon

    I just gave my notice at USPS after being a PMR for 2 1/2 years. I LOVED my job and did not want to quit but, after over a month of complaining of mold from a window AC being improperly installed, my doctors and family were concerned with my growing health problems. I had repeatedly reported these issues only to be told that "mold exists everywhere" and that my little PO was "not a priority." My boss even threw away the home mold test kit (she had given me) when I gave it back to her because she didn't realize it was going to cost $40 to have it analyzed. At that time, she AND the safety specialist again restated that mold is everywhere. My advice - if you want to keep good employees who love their jobs, treat them like you treat the customers! Respect them! Make them a priority!

    Aug 04, 2019
  • anon

    Part of the issue is training. Most are so needed that they are thrown in as a "sink or swim". Where is the real effort to retain supplemental help? Employee engagement should be visited with new hires and career employees. What are the individual strengths or areas of opportunity with each employee? Who is taking the time to discuss them and offer assistance or guidance where needed? True explanation of duties and responsibilities and an in depth review of SOP's regularly with all employees will assist in these areas of new hires who are not really understanding what they were hired to do or the legalities of carrying out daily duties. The most impacted area of retention is the carrier craft, RCA or CCA. It is difficult for any carrier to take on the amount of parcels for each route. Rural side, 3 second per mailbox is not efficient time given e-commerce and package influx and dismounts. While carriers are paid fairly, we need to reevaluate the daily extremes carriers face. Weather, unairconditioned LLV's, animal interferences, the size of parcels they are expected to carry (people are ordering 50lb bags of dog food REGULARLY), and they are still expected to come back in evaluated time. It is stressful, there is little assistance and some would like the return of ptf carrier/clerk to provide package delivery assistance. It is a VERY physically demanding job and adding in all of the legal public service responsibilities that require a significant amount of knowledge as it pertains to SOP's and public service, how can they keep anything straight when the goal of making it back in time for dispatch is CS priority. They are exhausted. Everyday they approach doorsteps and put themselves in harm's way by potential robberies or carry packages that we hope a customer was truthful when answering the HAZMAT question. Our carriers are the front line. No one would receive mail or packages with out them. For an agency that the public has grown to take for granted, most never question how in the world we are able to bring letters or packages from across the world to their door. Where is the engagement from management of appreciation for those who could be considered the backbone of the postal service. We will not stand straight until it is recognized that the carrier craft is in trouble and any genuine efforts put forth to understand the daily hazards and grueling conditions they endure with little to no training or assistance or recognition, we will continue to have retention issues. I am not a carrier, but I believe the hardest job that deserves the most respect is the carrier. Thank you for your service!

    Aug 03, 2019
  • anon

    I'm not even going to talk about the complete joke the RCA position is, and the insult that evaluated time is for a sub. I'll just talk about the CCA position. When I was hired as a CCA the most recently converted regular had spent 9 months as a CCA. My first week as a CCA they had me working 12 days in a row, and were calling me in on my SDO. Hours picked up and never went down. 50 hours a week became my baseline, 5 tens was about as light as I could expect. I worked harder than most regulars. I delivered more mail than any regular. I got paid significantly less, got treated much worse, and did not get much of anything in the way of benefits. CCAs are much more valuable employees to the Post Office and are treated like garbage. I was expected to work any day management decides, on any route management decides, and I get paid less than somebody who works 8 hours a day, with a set schedule, and only needs to know one route. The only way I could possibly ever plan anything in advance was by using Annual Leave which I had precious little of, or by calling in sick, which I was very much not inclined to do. I would find out if I was working or not the next day when I looked at the schedule before clocking out. I literally could not plan even a single day out. That is not something a person can maintain for years. When I quit, I had over a year and a half as a CCA and I was 10th in line to make regular. I was staring down a third christmas as a CCA and quite frankly I did not have it in me. I have no regrets about quitting, it was one of the best decisions I have ever made in my life. I am just thankful that I wasn't stupid enough to buy a new car, or start a family, like so many others who became trapped by their paycheck. Why would I want to plan my future with an organization that clearly values its new hires so little? With downright lazy Regular Carriers who claim that they paid their dues when they never spent a single day as a CCA? With a Union that feels entitled to collect dues from people who will in all likelyhood never make regular and never receive 95% of the benefits that the Union fights for? With supervisors who are about as trustworthy as a used car salesman, who will lie and lie and lie? With management that clearly cares far more about protecting itself from legal liability than it does about my safety? I had a senior carrier, great guy, always fantastic attitude, absolutely not the kind of person you would expect to hear this from, tell me that he could not in good conscience recommend this job to anyone anymore. When people like that are telling you to get out if you can it is time to run fast and hard.

    Aug 03, 2019
  • anon

    I applied for CCA in ending July all my paper work and background went thru. I spoken to my supervisor she was excited to have me, but then I get noticed that there was a breach with CCA. I’m in tears because I wasn’t expecting this. How is this now happening or when and why? Please fill me in so I don’t feel that it was just me? I’m crushed and really had my hopes up.

    Aug 03, 2019
  • anon

    Why does US Virgin Island mail go through Puerto Rico?? Our mail on St Croix is delayed 10 days or more. After hurricane mail came directly from Miama and we received it within 2 days. PLEASE stop our mail from going to Puerto Rico.

    Aug 02, 2019
  • anon

    I think there's many reasons why usps can't retain non career employees, First most of them don't know what they are getting into, you find out quickly that the only way to become regular is for someone to retire,,so you can work your but off and do the same work and at times more than a regular,and it doesn't matter,you get paid less,and benefits are not the same.you basically don't feel appreciated.This is the only job that I've ever had where i can't advance on job performance,knowledge,and becoming an asset to the company.i can be the best,fastest,accurate mail carrier and the only thing it will get me is more work and being pushed to complete in 8hrs. I've been fortunate that i haven't had bad management,but have seen 3 people quit already from my office,I'm the #3 CCA in my office with 2 vacant career spots available.should be 3 vacant ,but a spot is being held for a carrier on a supervisor assignment and holding me up.anyways,i think when hired there should be a chance at becoming a career employee after the one year of service. performance based,attendance,punctuality,and other areas,it's basically an incentive to stick around and give it your all,and it will pay off.,but know when you pay someone less ,for the same work,and no room for advancement or to be a regular ,then why stick around.....David F

    Aug 01, 2019
  • anon

    PSE Clerk. 7 mths total. P&DC, transfer to 1st Station, then transfer to 2nd Station. Answer: Lack of integrity and accountability that is rampant throughout all levels of the workforce. For example, foul, vulgar, and degrading language is the norm, sabotage of work performed or to be performed, ugly gossip and outright lying about co-workers, drunkenness, supervisors that put down the Postmaster, union rep that is explosive (let’s just hope superU uses that long knife just for box cutting), and a trainer who does not trainonly. In my entire career, I have never met a worse trainer (one who is most always miserable and sets up PSEs for failure by not teaching some of us, leaving out key details, making themselves so uapproachable becuase no one want to deal with the snide remarks, disdain, and misreable, disrespectful attitude). It is clear that a large percentage of operational Regulars that do not want PSEs. More specifically, successful and contributing PSEs that ‘take their overtime pay from them’ (their point of view). If a PSE makes a mistake because of no training, woo hoo! This just means they have permission to put someone down. Like a sport. They don’t want us to be fast or efficient. Numerous times from so many different people in varying words i have been told to not give a 100%. Including from fellow PSEs who have bought into this idea of going slow so you can get more hours. What the American public suspects about government waste and priviledge is surely true at these 3 locations. Are there a few shining stars that i have encountered. yes...so few which makes them shine all the brighter. These are the Regulars that should be championed. Corporate America lives by much, much higher standards. I make 1/4 of what i was making in corporate world. I am often challenged by the inconsistent and last minute work schedules. Makes it hard to balance work-life and have a 2nd job to make up for the low pay. Why do i stay? Because at least for now, the work i do matters more to me than the money I make. It is my hope that i can make a positive difference and who knows maybe one day soon I will be career and work with other like-minded people who live by the USPS code of ethics...even when no one is watching.

    Jul 31, 2019
  • anon

    As a new RCA, I have been subjected to a manager that screamed in my face. It did happen in front of other employees. It was degrading, humiliating and destructive. Outside of basic human kindness, no manager should ever speak to any employee this way. Especially one that is new, still learning and was never provided adequate on the job training. Most of need the job, so we put up with it. If the postal service will take these behaviors seriously, then the turnover rate would decrease.

    Jul 29, 2019
  • anon

    New CCA, i am currently 15 days away from 90 days. What I have found is that the supervisors don't care about us. They overload us with "assistance" and expect us to be back before 7. When 7 hits they panic. I also have a problem with supervisors scheduling us new CCAs everyday. I once worked two straight weeks without a break. I finally had a breaking point and asked for a day off. The reply was "oh sure I will fit it in there." I can understand why the turnover rate is so high. We are treated like slaves. We are treated like work horses, that we do not have families and lives. We need respect and we need to have a set of rules and regulations. If this continues on, I really do not see the future of the post office going any further. People do not want to be treated like crap on a regular basis.

    Jul 28, 2019
  • anon

    Unfortunately, there are managers and supervisors who are not engaged in their employees. As a result, the employee does not feel valued or appreciated. Some employees need to be referred to EAP early in their careers.

    Jul 28, 2019
  • anon

    I retired 1-1-17.city letter carrier 26 years. Management HARRASS intimidated steal labor by coerce cca to work off clock skip lunch .Delete clock rings.If you make it to be regular and keep doing this what chance does a new cca have to keep up with that carrier?TRAINING? Realy? Thats going to help realy OIG?? When is the OIG going to have the guts to stop this and stand up to management?The union contract and its grivance process dont work.Post office just transfer poor supervisor elsewere.The OIG should step in federal grand jury to inquire about wage thief and spending millons wasting good money on training new cca when they are doomed out of the gate.

    Jul 28, 2019
  • anon

    Give the subs a reason to stay. Pay them for the holidays, give them AL and SL. Make them feel like they are just as important as the regulars. Treat them with respect and let them know how valuable they are to the organization.

    Jul 23, 2019
  • anon

    I agree. We do the amount of work that deserves what they get paid and is well deserving of the sick days and benefits the regulars receive. In my office, I perform enough work to equal 3 people while getting paid barely enough to live while they have 2 trays of mail and have the nerve to ask for overtime. They aren't worth what they're paid. We don't receive benefits or get paid nearly enough to stay and work until we're ran into a hospital bed while they slack off.

    Aug 01, 2019
  • anon

    Small Office. 12 Routes all RCAs. On job for 7 Months. My Average time is 3 Hours under Eval [on the 2 I know] My regular on my primary assigned route says I am an amazing sub. Yet this is my life. Despite being 4 RCAs short the staff is young, some regulars want to work all the time and volunteer saturday so we dont split any routes and others dont want to be here who call in on a whim 90% of the time [Monday/Friday Mornings]. So my work experience is: 1.5 Days a week average. Normally Mondays as a 2nd day. Random routes I am often thrown out as needed not on my Matrix without casing help which leads to being over Eval on Mondays. FORCED PM ADVO CASING OFF THE CLOCK MONDAY AFTER WORK. Yup NO PAY for about 3 Hours of my workday every Monday. Work Hours: 7ish Sat & 11ish Monday for 8/ea Paid. Pay Check: 16hours + 60 Miles Cost: RHD Vehicle. Insurance. Gas. Maintenance. No Life outside of work as I am stuck at home waiting to see if I work or not? The PostMaster threatens to fire me if I dont answer the phone at 6am on a scheduled off day. I never received my Evals at 30/60/90 or w.e. until one day I didnt pickup the phone [out of cell range] on a day off. PO used that 1 day to list me "Unsatisfactory" on my evals and said "Now I can fire you for just cause any time I want" to force me to be on call. PO Insists I am ON CALL but not "On Call" so no pay for it. Less than Minimum Wage weekly income and I am not "Allowed" to go see my family a few hours away because I "Must be available to work at all times". Now I hear we may be "On Call" for up to 50 miles? $17/hr paying for my own Vehicle is not worth having no life. Actively seeking other employment.

    Jul 22, 2019
  • anon

    Fewer and fewer homes today have two incomes because fewer homes have 2 parents or couples ...its just a sign of the times ... so you have a single person trying to make a go with one day a week using their personal vehicle on a route which is going to compound the costs of keeping it running and when it fails management is going to tell them to rent a vehicle or borrow one... imagine asking your neighbor or friend or relative to use their sedan on a rural mail route. Insurance is expensive if you are sick and out you have no income. Three days training and you are turned loose to work on your own. And it may be 8 to 12 years of spotty work weeks before you are awarded a route, and then you start your first acknowledged day at the post office ... all those years, all those stress filled years you have no credit toward your years in at the USPS, no retirement savings, have had no benefits... but hey, you finally made it... made regular.

    Jul 22, 2019
  • anon

    Attended orientation in April 2019 then postal academy for RCA haven't touched any mail to this date only Amazon delivery on Sunday was hired with a disability haven't touched anything everyone at my location scared for their job so I quit yesterday.

    Jul 19, 2019
  • anon

    Northern Virginia, including Woodbridge has a long history of cheating the employees. If you work here, you'd better watch your hours. I can promise you that many have been robbed of their hours on the time clock. Postmasters have instructed supervisors and even deleted workhours themselves to make their daily workhour reports look better. Upper management knows, Postal Vice Presidents know and the Postal OIG knows. There is little interest in stopping this crime. I have first hand knowledge of postmasters, supervisors, and branch managers who have been caught stealing time and/or submitting false reports and they are still working in their positions. They are not even ashamed. They will argue and become aggressive when caught. They will then make efforts to discover who "ratted" them out so they can extract revenge. The easiest victims of this are the new employees and the 204b. Postmasters know that these employees are the least likely to complain about getting the ever lovin' money pilfered. This is upper level managements fault because they have no leadership and everyone knows that deep down in their evil, black hearts they are happy when it's done. They believe that when an employee is cheated out of their money that it's good for the post office because it saves money and makes the boss look good. LOCK THEM UP! (And, they don't report accidents either!)

    Jul 17, 2019
  • anon

    I I believe the reason why non career employee are leaving the post office is because there is no one monitoring career progression. For example at my office I am a regular letter carrier. We have about 10 city carrier assistant working extreme hours and it takes way too long to convert them. Constantly the union has to file grievances because management failed to post jobs on time and fill jobs on time. So we have somewhere to keep up with the vacancies this will levitate lot of the problems. One thing that I have seen firsthand that has caused numerous of non career employees to leave the post office was bad leadership. I seen the management team at my local office break all the rules that are within a contract in order to move the mail. I believe if management follow the rules and regulations within the contract, keep the morale high and treat employees with dignity and respect more non career employees will stick around to get converted.

    Jul 17, 2019
  • anon

    The Post Office always overworks there subsitue carriers. I Hold down a full time k Route And im still beting forced to work sunday which is My 6th day. Im over 40 hours explained to My PM that its too much And he doesnt care. I Dont know what to do AT this Point i just want to Quit. And im so close to making regular.

    Jul 13, 2019
  • anon

    I was an RCA for six months. I started on Jan 5th 2019 and still have not received my mileage reimbursement for 5 days of training in Manchester, NH. Mileage and hotel, food, for 4 days training in Vermont. I didn't want to quit being an RCA however I asked for assistance because a newly issued route was taking me 11-12 hours. I was scheduled to do this route 6 days in a row the week following my resignation. I would of been mentally and physically drained by doing 6, 11-12 hour days and because my PM was not willing to assist in finding a compromise, I resigned. I can no longer access Liteblue and wish to be paid for the money due. My PM has been stalling for months, 1st didn't know she had to submit a certain form, then didn't check on status when I asked. It's been 2 weeks and I still have not heard that I will be paid.

    Jul 12, 2019
  • anon

    New cca almost 1 month and a half in. I have similar job experience. I love This job. It’s getting easier. What I have learned since this time : Supervisors and management don’t care about you, or your safety. Even though you don’t deliver mail to a house with a safety concern they still hint to you to deliver it, making you feel like safety isn’t number one concern. We have people on vacation at my location right now. And currently I am getting a new route I have never done everyday. Makes no sense when a full time mail carrier has their same route everyday. Possibly helping out other carriers a few hours extra. Giving someone a completely different route daily make’s no sense. I think it makes it harder. Every neighborhood for us is completely different. A big problem for me is not sorting my own mail. It’s one thing having a completely different route everyday. But having another carrier sort my route is nuts. Everyday since than my sorted mail is oddly unsorted and I can’t do my best no matter what because of this. Makes me feel like I’m being set up to fail. Ridiculous how some carriers get a car with great ac or a llv with a baby fan. That small amount of a/c cools me down fast in this hot summer weather. I can definitely say your more likely to have heat exhaustion in a llv with only a baby fan. Currently almost got bit by a dog. Have had bad experiences with customers because I’m new and learning. Management made me personally upset with how they treated me about a safety concern I had. Definitely think more pay. I could definitely see a huge turn over with that alone. Every new cca will have a trainer for on the job training that makes it seem easy to you because it’s the same route everyday. Also Paying for work supplies with low pay with lots of hard work sucks. Technically new cca’s are working harder than full time carriers. We get different route’s daily. At least full time carrier’s get a route they are used to and 2 hours to help someone on their route. Extremely less stressful I would say. I feel like we work harder for less benefits and pay. It’s definitely not hard to see that. We had a new cca quit already.

    Jul 11, 2019
  • anon

    -Give who ever works day after holiday the holiday pay. -Equal pay no reason a career should get more than subs it's the same job. Assistance should get more they have to be on call 24/7 -401/k or let us buy into TPS too. -Treat us like humans we are not there everyday to know who is on hold or wants mail here not there etc. -LLV for all! Ridiculous assistance have to use their own card one day a week EMA doesn't cover esp on back road routes - assistance should get a guarantee week off just because we aren't full time doesn't mean we wouldn't like to go somewhere with our families. Been sub for 6 yrs thought I was finally going be full time was even told so then other carrier decided after I covered rt for a yr they wanted it.

    Jul 10, 2019
  • anon

    I just do not understand how RCA's do not get ANY benefits that match CCA. They do the same work. In my area no RCA works less then 3 days...unless they do not want to work. Which we have a couple peps that do not want more then 1 day. Its all about $$ and benefits. I was lucky and got full-time after 1 yr 25 yrs ago. I have seen most RCA work 7 yrs before getting FT.

    Jul 07, 2019
  • anon

    RCA Provide and maintain my own vehicle but only guaranteed one day a week. Usually work 6 days a week, but like a dog on unfamiliar routes. Can't plan anything, and no benefits, no retirement, no sick time. Am I a slave? Oh, and the new contract wants to force RCA's to work up to 50 miles away!? How is this sustainable? No possibility of converting for 10 years at least in my office. Who thinks this seems like a great opportunity?

    Jul 06, 2019

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