Wednesday Update:

Wow. Thanks for the fabulous response to the brainstorm. We’ve been overwhelmed by the sheer number of thoughtful responses. To give everyone enough time to comment and us a little time to read through everything, we’ve decided to extend the period for taking comments and post a blog about the brainstorm with the poll on Monday. Until then, please keep sharing your ideas. All suggestions received by Friday morning will be candidates for the poll. Oh, a word about moderation, we moderate every comment, and our policy is not to include comments that include vulgar words (even if the words are partially obscured with other characters) or involve name calling. We have not been able to approve a few comments that were otherwise very interesting because they violated our comment policy, so please double check your comment before you submit it. Thanks again!

Original Post:

The Postal Service is facing a financial crisis and needs to pursue every option it can to improve its net income. Pushing the Envelope thought it might be a good idea to ask for your thoughts. How do you think the Postal Service can save money or raise additional revenue? To make this a bit more interesting, the blog team will review your ideas and pick the most popular or most interesting for a poll. We’ll post the poll on Wednesday. So brainstorm now, and be sure to come back on Wednesday to view the shortlist and to vote for your favorites. Share your ideas in the comments below. Describe the idea, whether it involves cutting costs or generating revenue, and how much you think it could add to the Postal Service’s bottom line. Happy brainstorming! This topic is hosted by the OIG's Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).

Comments (570)

  • anon

    Eliminate bed loading of trucks it takes longer to unload puts employees at risk for injury and it is a waste of cube on trailers. By stoping bedloads some runs could be eliminated saving on transportation costs.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    Evaluated routes for all carriers, close down small town offices nationwide and Consolidate offices, abolish the postmaster job and replace it with a roaming regional manager, account temps to input data into computer, no more 204B's, take advantage of all valuable postal property and advertise with billboards, signs etc., advertising on postal trucks, abolish a lot of the EAS positions from a total of 50,000 to 25,000, No more diversity in management( most qualified gets the job!), contract out cleaning services, more fuel efficient vehicles or hybrids, do away with the Board of Governors! Generate new sales,Create new products and revenue!,offer major discounts to mass mailers, hire a marketing firm,go public with a stock offering and establish profit sharing for employees. Team up with Google for brains and cash flow!

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    O'k not a lot of people are going to like this recommendation. First since the FSS is right around the corner for most office's you need to adjust how the carriers are delivering the mail (walking,park&loop,dismount,curbside). The p.o. at the top needs to come to the relization that the way to save a bucket of money is to make it less costly for the carrier to deliver the mail. Whats the cheapest? Obviously, doing it the rural way with, you get paid by the piece. NOT going to happen!! So, the next cheapest is top have the carrier DRIVE the route! Thats right, convert as many areas as possible to curbline. You can make bigger routes and not have to deal with GRUMPY carriers who slow down to get there route's shortened because there route is just way too long, no matter how you look at it, this is true. They'll be more willing to not call out on those rainey, snowy days and will be better enthused to do there jobs. Now, the regulation doesn't allow the p.o. to just change where peoples maibox's are. Who can change the regulation? Who made it? The P.O.! Go to the BOG and tell them, during this time of finnancial troubles we need to do this! Tell all those senator's and congressman WE NEED TO DO THIS! And then do it. With the FSS the mounted routes were going to be the routes with the biggest gain in stops over the park & Loop routes. My route takes me between 5:45 and 6:00 hours to deliver Doing it all park & Loop, I have no doubt, doing it curbside would only take me 4:00 hours to complete. I truely believe that when FSS come's to my area that i will not, and so do a lot of other carriers in my office, speed up to deliver the mail. With not having alot of office time and more time on the road, curbside delivery is the way to go! It eliminates the one biggest thing that hurts the p.o. and thats the waste of time most, not all, that the carriers do WALKING.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    That is more than a billion dollar idea. It could eliminate about 1 out of 5 park and loop routes that it is done on.

    Jul 15, 2009
  • anon

    Keep the 6 day work week. Have each carrier cover 2 routes, rotating every day between the 2. T-6's would have to know 10 routes. Higher value 1st class, priority, and express mail gets delivered every day by newly appointed Special Carriers. All other mail gets delivered every other day. This would ensure the ability to get mail to someone every day, depending on the mail classification, and every other day to every address, non preferential and 1st class letters, second class. This system would make it difficult for competitors to fill in the void. This system could be implemented to the existing structure without major change and could easily be reverted back again if things change for the better down the road. You'll be eliminating 1/2 the carriers, plus retaining some as special carriers= you'll only need 2/3 our present carrier force. Non preferential mail will only be delayed 1 day.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    they need to cut managers we have 3 to 4 everyday WHY..7 city rtes 38 rural rtes 6 windows.we need a super for every person.clerks leave early carriers go to street so 1 morning supervisor 1 afternoon..we have 3 or 4 why oh plus postmaster that does what(NOTHING).

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    Well 1st off,I believe the post office should go back under the govt..The reason for this is the post office wouldnt be pushed to profit,they would be pushed to break even..Also the govt would regulate laws so that physical mail could somehow be on the same field as e-mail{maybe charging for emails after a certain amount sent}..The post office isnt designed to be a buisness..Its designed to be a service to the people...Honestly the post office dosent have the proper set up to compete with fedex and ups..We are still contracting work to them..It would be cheaper for us to do it in-house..So here's my ideas.. To cut costs: 1.No More Contracting 2.Offer better buyouts to employees 3.Use the machines you have 4.Stop giving out bonuses.. To Increase Revenue 1.Advertise about the benefits of physical mail{Espicially 1st class}.. 2.Create a new system called 3-Day guarantee mail.. Basically for any 1st class mail piece that wants to be arrived at a certain destination in 3 days,let them spend 44 cents+56 cents for a scan label...Remember most buisnesses use certified mail,but what about the average customer??This would make them more comfy about sending mail... 3.Push for govt regulation on email Lets have a balanced playing field 4.New pushcarts Stolen mail=stolen revenue and another reason for email..Also When mail gets wet,customers get mad..The pushcarts are outdated and we need 2 get with the times..

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    When the government takes over the P.O. we will not have a union or the benefits or the paycheck, etc. Socialism does not promote unions.

    Jul 31, 2009
  • anon

    I sent this idea in about ten years ago when you had a program asking for ideas. I would advertise on the thousands of postal trucks we have. You could have plastic signs with small frames fitted on the trucks for easy transfer.(say maybe a 2' by 3' size). Advertising Mcdonalds or Walmart for example could generate millions of dollars. You could do them by time periods (month) or regions (northeast). Get rid of the waiting period for making new stamps with famous people. You will lose millions by not making a Michael Jackson stamp this year. Of course there is the management problem. I would think you could eliminate 1/2 to 2/3 of the postmasters (post office and large city) and use district managers working approx. 3 offices in an area. That alone would save almost a billion a year. Considering 32,000 p.o.s the last time I heard and who knows how many city postmasters.)

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    Last contract negotiations with the NALC, Bill Young propoed a Mon-Fri regular workforce, with a Sat workforce made up of all Temps (including retired carriers. The cost of the Sat. workforce would be reduced (no benefits at all), and Sat. delivery would be saved! Any temp. shortages in Carriers on any given Sat. could be backfilled from the Overtime Dersired List (only in emergencies) and the use of retired Carriers would utilize their experience. Another suggestion would be to give Postmasters back their authority over Plant Managers. When GMF Plant managers became equal to Delivery Postmasters; that's when the lack of co-ordination between processing and delivery began, Often the bulk mail is not properly spread amongst the light first class mail days, and often Carriers are held hostage waiting for their mail in the mornong.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    Offer cash incentives, you can bet there won't be a stampede of people out the door like in '92, many are afraid to go due to declining economy. yet, others like myself will break the door down to exit. Target CSRS and the injured first, the numbers are there. Cut back on management and stop MDO's from hiring men and women they are sexually involved with and bring back the the ones they have detailed out the buildings into made up positions. Accept the fact that employees run the operations and have a group leader in every operation to continue doing so. To piggy back on the cash offers, how can there not be asvings in paying employees to leave? For each salaried craft employee a 25,000.00 incentive is like giving away a half of years salary to save on years of payroll. It is only a win win situation.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    1. Stop Duo Deliverly Busness with a p.o. box are getting two deliverys one at p.o. box and mail addresed to the street address 2. Bring Back The Carrier 701 Rule if you can do your route in 7 hrs. you get 8 hrs pay 3. Offer the workers something for every dollar in customer connect they bring in I'm not got to waste my time selling if i don't get something back 4. even the mail flow for the week vs heavy than light days. make the t-6 case all their routes so when the regualar come in they only would have to pull down and hit the street 5. end sat delivery

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    The one category of mail that is projected to increase nationwide are parcels. USPS gave up on them a long time ago. Its just now starting to show some intrest with flat rate offerings and mediocre commercials. Lets go after this market like our survival depended on it. Create a day of the week that anyone and I mean anyone can mail a parcel for 25 percent off. Lets show them that we can do this as good as the competition. Let them volunteer their emails and send them communication asking how their experience was. we, need a tier of service between priority and parcel post like our competition. We have empty trucks running all over this country. Why? because management has failed to anticipate the future of the mail. Has been self serving and will not rock the boat with their good suggestions for fear of reprisals and a sudden lack of momentum being lost in a quest for the next rung on the ladder. Result empty trucks few parcels and people wondering what happened. I beg management to put thier real thoughts on the table and stop playing like you agree with your superior. You and I may not have jobs next year so why not take a chance.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    The USPS is currently restructuring it's Area and District levels of management through a RIF avoidance process that is being administered. Postal management is clearly taking a hit on many different levels. The next thing that needs to happen is concessions from the Postal Unions. One quick that comes to mind is elimination of overtime pay for people that do not work forty hours on the clock in the pay week. Right now as an APWU member you can call in sick for 5 days and be asked to work your two non-scheduled days for which you would receive time and a half and double time. WAKE UP UNIONS!!! If you really want to keep your membership working it's time for give backs like the above mentioned.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    USPS has a myriad of problems which can be addressed if Congress and the Board of Governors would quit playing political football. First, the service has an over bloated management system starting from the top. This is a government service and upper level management should be paid no more than other comparable positions in civil service. The Postmaster General is over compensated and there is no need for 44 vice presidents. Down the line, there are to many levels of management. POOMs and the like are redundant. Programs that don't pay their way or are not used properly such as the Mystery Shopper and DOIS should be eliminated. Quit trying to transform postal lobbies into slick boutiques and go back to the basics like packaging materials, boxes and tape at an affordable price. Next, end the contracts with FedEx and UPS as they are ruining our ontime scores for Express Mail. What do you think those companies are going to take care of first, our product or theirs? If you want people to retire early then use the model that was used in the early 1990s, give people an incentive to retire early. Another thing, the USPS is a government run service so quit trying to make it into something its not, and it is also not the military. Giving employees "direct orders" is unheard of outside the military so just give employees their assignments and let them do the job. All postal managers should have a minimum educational standard and be required to complete human relations training before being allowed to work with employees. Evaluated routes would save the service money and might even allow us to keep 6 day delivery. Following these suggestions has the potential to save the USPS billions of dollars in the long run. I sincerely hope that somebody is paying attention to these posts.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    I totally agree. I am so sick of hear about being "IN COMPLIANCE". Is being talked to like I am at a boot camp going to make me want to do my job with pride? I don't think so!

    Jul 16, 2009
  • anon

    I AGREE 100%

    Jul 14, 2009
  • anon

    This is how I always envisioned economic survival: Save ourselves: 1. All USPS employees give back $10 a paycheck to help us survive. 600,000 or so workers multiplied by $10 multiplied by 26 paychecks= if my math is correct, 1.56 Billion Dollars ($10 is usually far less than most of us donate to our favorite charities). 2. Holding mail is a premium service and we need to start charging for it. Can't figure out the exact revenue gained but it would be significant. 3. Eliminate silly details that are "score related". Get these people back in the departments where they belong. Service to me is folks getting the right mail, at the right time, every single day. Going out to deliver one piece of mail on overtime is silly and not cost-effective. Driving four towns over to make sure an express mail is delivered by noon is silly. The reimbursement of gas and mileage is usually more costly than the express mail itself. We deliver several billion pieces of mail, sometimes mail won't get there when it's supposed to. These are three basic ideas that could save a lot of money and a lot of jobs. We all know that there are ideas bouncing around about 5-Day Delivery and HR 22, but at this point these issues are out of our control and we need to focus on things we can control.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    $100 per paycheck = $1.56 billion. $10 is only $156 million.

    Jul 15, 2009
  • anon

    I really hate to say this, but I would consider "giving back" something like $10-$20 per pay check (or so), not to directly help the USPS "survive" but, indirectly, if the USPS would use that money to offer a real VERA (with an incentive) and promise no carrier layoffs.

    Jul 14, 2009
  • anon

    I'd be happy to "give back $10 per paycheck" if I knew the money was actually going to be used in a proper way. As a rural carrier these people lie, cheat and steal on a yearly basis to "take back" thousands of dollars from me and most other carriers during their corrupt mail counts. You'll notice they didn't offer the bulk mailers any "summer sale" type discounts during a mail count. Instead they give them discounts to NOT mail during that period. Potters "bonuses" are more than most of us will see in a lifetime.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    A work culture that rewards lying, cheating and stealing from employees-give back $10 a pay period-when hell freezes over

    Jul 15, 2009
  • anon

    Advertise on the side of the vehicles. Those trucks are on the road all the time. You can find local business to rent space on these vehicles. Im not talking nascar but a nice ad for say an ice cream shop or the local locksmith. These truck are seen everywhere...

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    excellent idea!

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    postalbear.... Nice idea. However if you go back to my comments posted a half hour earlier (6:41pm) I believe you'll see I said the exact same thing. Nonetheless I can't believe the USPS hasn't utilized this. Then again when you look at the rest of their decisions, I guess I can believe it.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    I think the best solution is to lay off all the PTFs and some junior regulars(maybe 2 years or less), but offer them TE positions with maybe 1-2 years of renewable contracts. This is the only way to get people to work when they are always on the heel afraid of not being brought back for a new contract. Only after showing good job performance after a couple of years are they allowed to be promoted to a regular. I really think this would work. because of right now, even PTfs, once they are "in" they are "in". They immediately slack off and think they are entitled to everything like the people who have been servicing for 20+ years.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    That's the Answer? Lay-off the lowest paid, most flexible, and (most often) hardest working employees? THAT'S CRAZY. What - you don't think those people work well enough? Better idea is to offer a VERA with an incentive (or at least no penalty - allowing people to go with full benefits). That way the people who want to leave will do so. There are an awful lot of real old timers on the roles, some with 40 years or more of service, who are certainly eligible to retire. I don't think anybody should be forced to retire but it should be made a more attractive option - especially in the current economy. Most of the people eligible for the recent VERA's just can't afford to go. Many would, though, if they just didn't loose benefits that they would earn by staying. Hey, they are doing the USPS a favor, at some cost to themselves, if they leave early. Least the USPS could do is throw them a bone.

    Jul 14, 2009
  • anon

    ABSOLUTELY Scott, See "Hal's" comment from July 14th below. No penalty; Full retirement annuity and most of the EAS who qualify will go, saving MILLIONS!

    Jul 14, 2009
  • anon

    USPS DOES NOT need to undercut prices then try to make it up in volume. They are NOT loosing out to the competition, UPS and FedEx, because their prices are too high - in fact, the USPS is already often less expensive for comparable services. Rather, the USPS is loosing business because it is giving away the business. That is, it is continuing to aggressively cut services and eliminate the conveniences that would give them the business edge if only they would put as much effort into selling themselves better. As someone who regularly both ships and receives packages, I find the USPS the most convenient service for the following reasons; 1) delivery SIX days per week, 2) Offices open SIX days a week, 3) Close and convenient locations when I need to pick up a package, send a package, or get supplies, 4) Free pick-up on my packages, 5) Reasonable rates and 6) available tracking options. These are all big pluses for the USPS. If I have to pick-up a UPS or FedEx package, I have to go to thier local hub station which is 30 to 50 miles out of my way - My local post office is only a few blocks away. But many post offices are cutting hours - making it harder for me to pick up my package before or after work. I've heard people complain about USPS tracking but I find it highly reliable. Yes, UPS gives me tracking at more points on route to my package destination but the package also takes longer to get there. Most of the time, My USPS priority package is at it's destination before I feel a need to check the tracking info - all I really need is confirmation of delivery and I don't really care where my package has been along the way if it gets there in good time. Why doesn't the USPS promote that? As an example of a service cut that hurts the USPS, I offer elimination of the automatic second attempt on express mail deliveries - UPS and FedEx both offer second (even third) attempts on ALL of their package deliveries - That's service! And I know from experience that it just isn't that big of a deal for a carrier to take an express back out on the second day. I think the USPS should do second attempts for priority packages as well. I like the idea of adding more automated shipping options, like the ones in many post office lobbies, in more locations such as supermarkets or libraries. Perhaps they could even be co-branded with other business partners (like Ebay). But the USPS lacks this kind of outside-the-box marketing strategy and does not even do an adequate job of promoting those service and conveniences it does offer. How many people really know about the automated machines in the post offices? Also, the USPS has a horrible public perception problem which, I think, is due to it's trying to be the "K-mart" of delivery services. The USPS has become so known for the delivery of "Junk" mail that few really want that overshadows and overwhelms the quality of it's core services. Finally, what does it say that letter carriers are universally well known as the most trusted government employees yet most people have less than favorable views of the Postal Service? Postal management, which needs to be reduced and revamped to concentrate more on sales and customer service than managing employees and computer generated numbers, needs to listen to the suggestions of letter carriers and leave them alone to do their jobs efficiently and effectively as they clearly know how best to.

    Jul 14, 2009
  • anon

    I have always thought that if you don't touch the mail or a piece of equipment that moves the mail then you are overhead and we have way too many people that are nothing more than overhead. Many of these people are doing nothing more than generating a report or coming up with a new report to be generated. Get rid of them and save millions. Delivering mail to the door should be something of the past, yet in small-town America not only are we still delivering to the door but our new deliveries are being allowed to put mailboxes at the door. Consolidate mail delivery points and eliminate 30 to 40 percent of these walking routes across America. As for closing Post Offices, if the Post Office doesn't generate enough revenue to cover all the expenses of running it including the labor, it should be consolidated with a neighboring Post Office. All of these evaluations that the USPS have done and are currently doing are bogus because nothing is being done. All they are doing is costing the organization more money.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    This has been touched upon. The postmaster for each office format is outdated. It could be changed initially to an area postmaster, say one postmaster per county. That one is sufficient to handle all PM duties. Each facility could be headed by supervisors. In offices where there are more than one supervisor then one would be crew leader. In offices where no full time supervisor is needed a crew leader clerk or carrier would suffice. The smaller sized post offices could be classed as stations/branches and be manned by a clerk which would be assigned by schedule, etc. As many carriers will agree PMs often hinder rather than help in an obvious attempt to feel useful. PM salaries are the biggest single waste in the Postal Service.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    Amen to this. Most PM's don't really do anything anyway. Stop the second truck from coming at 9 am. It doen't really bring much of anything anyway. If you have already left the office, the mail stays until the next day anyway. Sometimes it only brings 0ne or two pieces of mail for the whole office. Check the time sheets that the PM's turn in. A lot of cheating goes into them. Let us do our job, we know what to do.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    Agree!!!

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    Reduce layers of management. District bosses always seem to travel in groups of three, and never seem in a hurry to get on to other duties. Eliminate the two who stand back and nod, then add some duties to the third one. Trim training videos to necessary info, and only show them to the employees who need to see them. It makes no sense for carriers to learn about over the counter sales, or for clerks to hear about dog bite prevention. Cut back on paperwork, reports, and telecons for local management. That would let the USPS eliminate at least one management position in each station. From there, consider changing the APWU clerks contract to allow them to act as a 204B while performing clerk work, so one manager could cover multiple small stations with clerks overseeing operations the rest of the time. Encourage management to get cost savings ideas from actual workers. The USPS may not believe it, but there are A LOT of carriers and clerks with an IQ above 120 and a mental list of ways to improve the USPS. So far, the big problem has been getting USPS HQ to consider ideas that come from craft employees. There is nothing magical about upper management, and in most cases their removal from the workroom floor means that they have LESS knowledge about how to improve operations.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    This isn't brain surgery. First and foremost you trim the "fat" and the fat in the USPS is management. Rural carriers manage themselves. City carriers are managed by "numbers." Neither craft needs $85,000 a year "babysitters," people who were failed craft workers and are now put into position to try and tell professionals how to do jobs that they themselves could not. A "204-B" could be appointed one afternoon a week to process timecards and make sure the city carriers and rca's are not making unnecessary overtime. In my office we have three city supervisors for 20 city routes. While the carriers are doing their job on the road (7 hours out of an 8 hour day) these 3 supervisors have nothing to "supervise." ELIMINATE AT LEAST ONE SUPERVISOR from virtually every delivery unit in the United States and you would never have to raise the price of stamps again. So much of the information the district claims to need on a day to day basis is already available to them electronically, through the use of "swipe cards" and scanners. Also stop offering major discounts for "dps prepared mailings" that do not and can not be run on automated equipment. Bulk mailers can make all the threats they want, but they know that the USPS offers them the best way to reach the public regardless of the postage. Newspapers are vanishing or being cut back to weekend only editions. The USPS HAS a monopoly on reaching EVERY household in the country. Mailers can and will pay to reach them. ADVERTISING...With the exception of some EMA routes on the rural side (where carriers use their own vehicles) the postal service basically has a postal vehicle on every street in America everyday. Many of the vehicles being used are LLV's (Long life vehicles) that have PRIME advertising space available on the sides, front and back of these vehicles. Plastic or cardboard placecards could be slipped in slat holders on each side. The USPS could change its advertising as often as it desired. It would take seconds to slide a new ad in. The USPS could also "rent" the advertising space on their vehicles to other companies. These trucks are seen by everyone, everyday on every street. The USPS continually shoots itself in the foot. When competitors, such as Fed Ex and USPS raise their rates every Spring (to satisfy THEIR union costs, etc) the USPS should undercut them on the rates we charge, NOT raise are rates, needed or not needed, to meet them. Give consumers a CLEAR value to choose, not an "even" or conflicting one. The other thing the USPS has been famous for under Potter is the lessen customer service, fatten his own wallet and the wallets of upper management people who they "don't want to lose to the private sector." These are the same people who are driving the postal bus off of the cliff. Let them go. Instead of cheapening our services we should strengthen them, undercut competitors prices and stop trying to take away money from the craft workers... who in fact "move the mail" which is what the USPS is supposed to do, giving it instead to its LEAST productive "work" force... unneeded layers of management.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    we have forgotten we are a SERVICE industry and if we don't return to it the public will find someone that will provide customer service. The rural carriers are self managed and city carriers could easily be also. Rural carriers have had salary cuts every year for the last few years due to our structure, I personnally have lost $6000 dollars a year this year and have a shorter amount of time to deliver my mail. If I spend a few extra minutes doing customer service, I can expect to be in the Postmaster's office explaining why. We have a "program" rural reach which I say hey pay me what you pay the marketing people and I'll reach anyone you want me to, ha ha.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    Almost all of Southern California and Las Vegas send its mixed trays, tubs, and sleeves to be palletized into like kind items to a company in Ontario, California. Why can't we save the millions of dollars the USPS spends when we, with the proper planning and supervision and management, are able to do it ouselves? The reason it went to a private company is that supervision allowed their favorite employees to do the job of palletizing the plant's empty equipment. More often than not, these same indviduals made it their own private money maker: slowing down the process of palletizing empty equipment so the work overflowed and they could rake in the overtime for themselves without intervention of proper oversight and accounting from management or supervision. Management never questioned them or held them accountable. Why? Why are we outsourcing mail service processing to private firms when we can do it ouselves here in Southern California? We are paying the outsourcing companies millions of dollars for their capital expenditures as well as our own? Again with proper management, planning, oversight and accountablility we could do it ouselves. I was told in no uncertain terms that my college degree was of no use to the USPS. Why? Because supervisors and managers are picked not by their talents and ablities, but by who they know. Those of us who want and have the needed skills and abilities are never given the opportunity to prove ouselves. Many of us have degrees in education and the social sciences, and have demostrated management skills at other locations. Yet the USPS has not nutured those skills not utilized them to the benefit of the Service. WHY? Therefore, the under-utilization of potential talent has cost the Service millions. The Service should go back under total Government control because it belongs to the People of the United States. The Service most innovate, grow, and utilize and seek potential talent if the Service wishes to survive. Why did the Postmaster General give away our parcels to private companies that lead to the creation of UPS and FedEx? Was the Postal Service not innovative or creative, or progressive enough to solve the processing problem/logistics? Where were the Board of Govenors during this process? Did they have a conflict of interest? Most of all, the Service must be customer friendly where service is at its best and improve where it is not. Supervision and Management must use commonsense, oversight, accountablity, and have communication skills necessary to treat their subordinate employees and each other with respect and dignity. Lastly, the Service must learn to innovate and move fast to keep pace with private industry and the changes in the economy. Remember, great ideas also come from those that do the work of the workroom floor. Please give credit to those who have good and viable ideas and do not appropriate those ideas for manangement's own personal aggrandizement.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    Bingo!!!!

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    the usps should set up a money transfur program. Where you can go to your local PO and send money to any other po in the country. The person receiving the no fee money order will have to supply identification and we would charge a fee, like western union

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    Move light duty people off the rolls after no more than 1 year. Too many career light duty people that stay on light duty sometimes for 20 years or more. Post Master position no longr needed, esp. in large city's. Waste of money, and what is their purpose? Use more casuals, esp. when so many light duty people are still employed.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    That is simple. Make everyone move there mail box to the street. I see no reason for carriers to be climbing three flights of stairs to put an ad in a mail box. Or better yet, put cluster boxes at the corner of each street. This would save many man hours and help to eliminate injurys from falling and dog bites.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    If this idea could be implemented it would save enough money to put the USPS into the black. P.S. Curbside delivery (with 2 boxes @ the property line) offers a product as effecient as a CBU and more convenient for the customer and preserves curbside parking.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    Forwarding should be free for only the first six months. All 1st class, periiodicals and parcels should be forwarded postage due for the next six months, with a change of address notification sent to the mailer, and all mail after a year returned to the mailer postage due. Stop subsidizing people too lazy to notify their creditors and relatives that they have moved. Stop the silliness of retracing for a piece of mail that DPS missequenced. I thought that was the purpose of 3M, to identify those problem areas so they could correct the sortation programs.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    What....you mean its not so the Postmaster get a bonus????

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    This idea is very simple and will save a mountain of cash while improving service: The Postal Business model is outdated and uner unfriendly. Post offices today traditionally have a delivery unit and retail/PO Box unit in every town. These offices are usually located in the same places they were over 100-years ago, most often in the center of town. But that's no longer where people go to shop. WE NEED TO GO WHERE THE PEOPLE ARE, imstead of making the people come to us. Here's how you do it. A) Take any 3 or more towns located within a 15-min driving area and close down all but the centrally located office. B) Mail today is soreted by machines in cenrtral locations and trucked to every individual office. That's a huge waste of time because if that truck serves 12 offices, then whereever it is now, it isn't at the other 11 offices. We all wait for processed 1st class mail to arrive. So, C) Consolidate the "3 or more" delivery units into one. THERE, you just saved all those redundant managers salaries, as 2 can supervise 60 routes as easily as 6 presently supervise 20 each in 3 offices. AND, the truck arrives with ALL THE MAIL for all three offices simultaniously. D) MOST IMPORTANTLY, lease, buy or build space for a retail/PO Box unit IN SHOPPING CENTERS WHERE PEOPLE ALREADY GO. "User Friendly." Like in a Wal-Mart or Grocery Stores as the banks do. Don't say we can't do trhat when A BANK handling cash can! Now picture this: You go to the store and instead of buying a gift card (impersonal) you can now buy a personalized gift, have it wrapped at the customer service desk and then you go to the USPS STORE and have it pacgaged in a Flat Rate Box and mailed out RIGHT THERE! No need to drag the item into your tiny car and all the way home. People just won't do that anymore, so they but a gift card and we get 44-cents instead of $5-$20 in Priority/Insured/Delivery Confirmation postage. So the idea is to close down the old post offices, relocate the retail units to where the people are, and consolidate the Delivery Units into central locations to more efficiently operate all aspects of OUR POSTAL SERVICE. Regards.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    this is already happening .. local politicians & our unions fight it saying "not in my town" .. what town should they start in

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    you already have each route with scanners why do you need a 204b?.the data can be checked at the district office what time carriers leave,return and there are bar codes on the street to see timing and arrival at certain location,if your hands are not on the mail you don't need them.USPS focus should be on getting the mail to the customers and not how many reports should be done at the local post office,its time to slice and dice people who don't handle the mail.somebody wake up before this great organization we love the USPS is run to the ground.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    scanners have the ability to do alot more than we are doing in our office at least, we do ge the little commercials on Tuesdays and Thursdays. That is another way to get rid of management.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    Cut management and go to a five day work week,for once let common sense prevail,billions will be saved.How can we bring in revenue?Years ago I remember UPS went on strike,what does the Postal Service do?Put a limit(seven I believe)on how many packages a customer can mail,another golden opportunity sqaundered.

    Jul 13, 2009
  • anon

    I remember the UPS strike. At the time I worked in logistics for a large multi-national company. Monthe before the strike we started to divert packages to USPS piority mail. The local USPS sales rep told us that we can not handle any extra packages at our facility, if we want to ship with USPS we would have to take them to the nearest plant. TRUE STORY

    Jul 14, 2009

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  • 1 day 10 hours ago
    YES All Postal Carriers should wear an approved Uniform, that will identify them. But, only window clerks, city carriers and maintenance employees are getting an allotment to buy uniforms. Rural...
  • 1 day 12 hours ago
    nope, no one cares until something happens .. post office does nothing until fatality strikes. and they only do something then to cover their butts.

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