Wednesday Update:

Wow. Thanks for the fabulous response to the brainstorm. We’ve been overwhelmed by the sheer number of thoughtful responses. To give everyone enough time to comment and us a little time to read through everything, we’ve decided to extend the period for taking comments and post a blog about the brainstorm with the poll on Monday. Until then, please keep sharing your ideas. All suggestions received by Friday morning will be candidates for the poll. Oh, a word about moderation, we moderate every comment, and our policy is not to include comments that include vulgar words (even if the words are partially obscured with other characters) or involve name calling. We have not been able to approve a few comments that were otherwise very interesting because they violated our comment policy, so please double check your comment before you submit it. Thanks again!

Original Post:

The Postal Service is facing a financial crisis and needs to pursue every option it can to improve its net income. Pushing the Envelope thought it might be a good idea to ask for your thoughts. How do you think the Postal Service can save money or raise additional revenue? To make this a bit more interesting, the blog team will review your ideas and pick the most popular or most interesting for a poll. We’ll post the poll on Wednesday. So brainstorm now, and be sure to come back on Wednesday to view the shortlist and to vote for your favorites. Share your ideas in the comments below. Describe the idea, whether it involves cutting costs or generating revenue, and how much you think it could add to the Postal Service’s bottom line. Happy brainstorming! This topic is hosted by the OIG's Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).

Comments (570)

  • anon

    I have an idea that should get attention and hope it does for the sake of the USPS and me of course. I can save the USPS well over $100 million a year without making an investment that does not exceed what they already do every month as well as not change any procedure they already follow. It would not require any downsizing of any nor would it require any additional training. The program will work I have done it with other company as well. I don't have actual numbers but do know my numbers are low!! The savings could be alot higher with the actual numbers. Also this would be a "GREEN" initiative. Perhaps this will be read to speed the process of getting in front of the right person.

    Sep 29, 2011
  • anon

    with the new rules coming on stamps, living people, etc, lets us put advertising on the stamps, charge a little more for the service.

    Sep 28, 2011
  • anon

    Many neighborhoods could have mailboxes on the street here in Columbus. There is no reason for mailmen to have to go to each house to put mail in the mailbox attached to the house. There are so many good suggestions in these posts.... maybe it's time to impliment some of them?

    Sep 28, 2011
  • anon

    I agree that the times of having mail dropped in a door slot should be eliminated. Columbus is only one of many markets where this old-fashioned method exists. Columbus has a huge carrier count as each carrier is on foot simply because of the door slot delivery method. I know it's not popular but those foot carriers can be consolidated 10 foot carriers to 1 with a motor carrier droping off curb side instead. Multiply that by the 1000s of communities still using door slot and there's a billion+$$$ savings alone.

    Oct 04, 2011
  • anon

    I am an RCA (just over a year now) and I came into the Post Office at a difficult time. No complaints there--I knew what I was getting into. I can only speak about rural routes, as I know so little about the city routes in our office. The rural routes in our office are inefficient and don't make any sense. They criss-cross each other in their line of delivery and many times split subdivisions unnecessarily. It would save money and time if more thought were given to the layout of these routes and "route clustering" were implemented for each route. Some routes have potential for growth, while others clearly do not. This is obvious from even a cursory glance. I think that a bunch of third-graders with a box of crayons could do a better job than what has been established at our branch office. With the recent shake-ups and threats of eliminating one of our rural routes, I thought these issues would be dealt with by now. However, in spite of threats to that effect, nothing has happened. I hesitate to suggest this, as it would mean eliminating jobs (mine included) and make me very unpopular, but I wonder why this is never addressed? I am not leaving my real name, as I cannot risk repercussions.

    Sep 26, 2011
  • anon

    Be advised, I'm speculating here.. But, I don't think I'm far off track...? That wouldn't work Cathy. Every job you eliminate results in 5 (est.) votes that the Congressmen/woman in a particular subject district won't get. However, the very-very-very intresting thing about this analogy is.... I have personally found that most of the postal folks I interact with every day, don't know who their congressional member is. Additionally, they don't vote, (just what I've determined from chit-chat with them) or know who presides on the congressional Subcommittee, Federal Workforce U.S. Postal Service and Labor Policy. Oh yeah, that box of crayons you're talking about, is one heck of alot more useful and cheaper than studies conducted by Rand Corporation, the NALC, or the GAO. I understand there have to be standards, but universal service does not mean vanilla or chocolate are the only flavors either....

    Oct 03, 2011
  • anon

    There seems no reason to have a letter carrier at my front door 6 days a week. It seems to make more sense to reduce the delivery to every other day, and to divide the routes into even and odd, so that alternate days the letter carrier would be on another local route. This way, special deliveries (more$) and box pickups could still be handled. Also, existing boxes and the disabled won't be singled out. Getting mail 3 days a week delivered just as it always has been seems like a great compromise.

    Sep 19, 2011
  • anon

    I would like to suggest that PO split into 2 divisions - one that handles packages with 6 or 7 day deliver. The other part handles letters. Eliminate Saturday delivery (even to businesses) but PO should be open to accept letters. Also, start eliminating home delivery. Begin with enclosed communities like gated communites and setup a mail drop station at the entrance or within the community. Similar to apartment buildings. This will cut down on time for door to door, same gas, reduce neessary personnel for home delivery, etc. Eventually each street or community should have a mail station to accept letters and average sized packages. It can also have a place where people can mail their letters. For the personnel that would be affected, offer early retirement to anyone that would quality. Keep the most productive and experience staff anc rotate into the package piece. Expand that area and compete with UPS and FEDEX rate and delivery guarantee. Run it like a business.

    Sep 11, 2011
  • anon

    - Charge for forwarding mail - Charge for package pick-up at businesses - Partner with companies to sell goods at Post Offices like tech devices. Older people would buy them vs. going online and there is a good chance at impulse buying (Singapore does this) - Raise rates for bulk mail

    Sep 11, 2011
  • anon

    Sep 05, 2011
  • anon

    Make Parcel delivery 365 days a year espically on medications, go after after UPS with force and redeliver the next day; unless the customer requests to pick up their parcel. Have a call by 6:15pm same day hotline for pick up. Have a person designated in each office detailed to separate parcels for redelivery or pick up daily with the utmost accuracy and accountable for detail. Postal service pay for email service which gives their email the same legal protection as regular mail. To supplement postal service funds have businesses able to advertise on the the postal vehicles based on averaged driver miles on a daily rate tracked and credited if vehicles are in for repair maintenance. Place a bid to read meters for utility companies to supplement mail delivery. They'll deliver the utility companies data at a fraction of the price. Cut salaries at the top. Do away with lush performance bonuses. Create jobs printing regionally across the US producing mail advertising layouts. Employ print press workers and graphics design employees haul with employees already working in the postal service. Offer shipping discounts to businesses who sign a contract to exclusively ship with USPS. Cut manager jobs cut manager pay. Cut manager health benefits, benefits should be limited to those who perform manual labor. Get rid of company vehicles for all managers. Do away with per diem for managers. Only move managers within commuting distances by taking advantage of temporary managers to fill vacant manager jobs. Create an all part time manager work force. Create an incentive bonus to employee who have a good attendance year.

    Aug 13, 2011
  • anon

    great scheme... .it will emphatically lead to all new public-private partnership

    Jul 23, 2011
  • anon

    Hi, Have you ever considered collecting old batteries? Batteries are everywhere and hard to recycle as you often have to go considerably out of your way to do so. If life were so simple that all you had to do with old batteries was to leave them in your mailbox and the USPS would take them away and see that they were properly recycled,pretty much everyone would do it and thus have a huge impact. Someone is making money off of recycling batteries, why not the USPS? Thanks

    Feb 23, 2011
  • anon

    The Postal Service should get into the hydrogen fuel business.First the PO should convert all its vehicle fleet to hydrogen fuel cell, then open hydrogen fueling station selling hydrogen fuel to the public at many of its facilities around the country. This alone over time would reduce fuel cost and generate new revenue through future service to the public.

    Feb 22, 2011
  • anon

    The Postal Service should get into the hydrogen fuel business.First the PO should convert all its vehicle fleet to hydrogen fuel cell, then open hydrogen fueling station selling hydrogen fuel to the public at many of its facilities around the country. This alone over time would reduce fuel cost and generate new revenue through future service to the public.

    Feb 22, 2011
  • anon

    Make all parcels and slugs delivery conformation. Only charge customers when they access delivery results on-line. This would solve a major problem for the USPS; Carriers are told that we don't scan parcels and customers won't use the USPS, because, we don't scan. If every parcel has a bar code that we have to scan, then every paecel will be tracked and this will help the USPS locate lost or stolen packages, saving even more money. And by charging customers for checking status this will generate even more revenue from parcels that today are not tracked at all. By proving that the USPS does scan every parcel we will gain customers from other delivery company's that are presently considered more reliable. Because we don't charge at the front end for tracking, and our delivery prices are the cheapest in the world, we should show profits in the Millions if not billions. And therefore retain our jobs which if we don't become more creative and run more efficiently we will cease to exist. Edward Fox, 03117539, 9300 Ellen Ct, Thornton Co 80229.

    Dec 22, 2010
  • anon

    Stop contracting out so much work and saying it save money. I've been around a while, I've served in the military and ran my own business for several years...I know it's possible to play with statistics and math to support contracting out, but I also know that it rarely save any money and often ends up costing more in the long run. Management often claims that funds for contracting come out of another pool of money...huh? Isn't ALL money in the pool property of the USPS? this is the type of thinking that puts us in the hole. ALL spending is bad, so lets try to cut spending and find ways do affordably keep work in house.

    Dec 14, 2010
  • anon

    Cut back on grievences by holding management accountable for intentionally not following the contracts with unions. Also hold them equally accountable for failures, mistakes, or accidents they may have. It seems that when they screw up, nobody is on their heels with written warnings and threats of termination. Make ALL equal and people will be less likely to create these grievable situations.

    Dec 14, 2010
  • anon

    Stop paying bonuses to managers and supervisors.

    Dec 14, 2010
  • anon

    Here are some reality numbers... It may sting a bit though.... Increase the current practice of sending casual employees home 25 clicks early after they did the 7.75 hrs of work of two or or more unavailable regular employees. Since the USPS lost $8.5 Billion $8,500,000,000; near illustration below.... http://www.rimmkaufman.com/rkgblog/2008/12/20/what-eight-hundred-billion-dollars-looks-like/ The potential savings on this regular practice could erase last years fiscal loss, if performed a total of 1,942,857,143 times over the next 40 years. Assuming a 20K year round casual compliment. BTW (it really helps to see the attached link).

    Nov 29, 2010
  • anon

    1. Have mailing kiosks at airports next to screeners. When an object is not allowed onboard, it can be placed in prepaid boxes to send items back home. A small, medium, large container would be enough choices. 2. All neighborhoods will have a central mailbox cluster like apartments/condos do. This will allow one carrier the ability to deliver to dozens of addresses in one spot. Oversize packages go in locked bins with the key being placed in the homeowner's box.

    Nov 26, 2010
  • anon

    An Internet Postal Portal: "If you cannot beat em', join em'!" Most people agree that the internet, specifically e-mail and online bill paying have significantly reduced the volume of first class mail. Even periodicals have taken a hit; more people are getting their news online and subscribing to online magazines and trade journals. My proposal would be to merge the two worlds (Internet and Post Office) into an online portal and here is how I suggest we do it! 1. Post Office E-mail: Microsoft, Yahoo and Google are leaders in free personal e-mail services. How do they make money? Advertising! Why not create such a service for postal customers? How about yourname@mypostoffice.com for example. 2. Online Periodical Subscriptions: As said before many people are getting their news and digital magazines and newspapers at home or work on their computer completely bypassing the use of mail. I believe there is a two faceted approach to this conundrum. First, take hint from companies like Magazines.com that make a commission by being a third part to ordering magazine subscriptions by mail. Second, take the same approach to newspapers and trade journals. Last, partner with the periodical companies to act as a commission based vendor for online subscriptions. People really do pay to read periodicals such as the Wall Street Journal or National Geographic online. Imagine a portal where you have consolidated online subscription access all in one place! 3. Online Shopping Partnership: The Post Office has already got on the band wagon with EBay and PayPal to incorporate Postal shipping into their websites. Why not take an aggressive approach to partner with the five biggest online retailers; Amazon, Dell, Office Depot, Staples and HPDirect. There are thousands of online retailers up for grabs! 4. Incorporate existing USPS.com services with the portal. You can already track a package from the Postal website. Imagine someone being able to buy a book from Amazon.com, ship through the Post Office and get shipping alerts sent to their Postal e-mail address. You can also already rent a PO BOX from the website,imagine being able to get payment notices in your Postal email.That's creating multiple sources of revenue from one transaction! We can no longer "stay the course". A drastic change in services is the only option. You cannot convince e-mailers to go back to mailing cards or online bill payers to go back to writing checks and mailing them. Sorry to deflate the Postal ego, but regular old mail is turning old fashioned... as an analogy it's like trying to keep a person who buys DVD's to go back and buy your cassette tapes. We have to compete with these new and superior conveniences by providing these superior conveniences!

    Nov 25, 2010
  • anon

    An Internet Postal Portal: "If you cannot beat em', join em'!" Most people agree that the internet, specifically e-mail and online bill paying have significantly reduced the volume of first class mail. Even periodicals have taken a hit; more people are getting their news online and subscribing to online magazines and trade journals. My proposal would be to merge the two worlds (Internet and Post Office) into an online portal and here is how I suggest we do it! 1. Post Office E-mail: Microsoft, Yahoo and Google are leaders in free personal e-mail services. How do they make money? Advertising! Why not create such a service for postal customers? How about yourname@mypostoffice.com for example. 2. Online Periodical Subscriptions: As said before many people are getting their news and digital magazines and newspapers at home or work on their computer completely bypassing the use of mail. I believe there is a two faceted approach to this conundrum. First, take hint from companies like Magazines.com that make a commission by being a third part to ordering magazine subscriptions by mail. Second, take the same approach to newspapers and trade journals. Last, partner with the periodical companies to act as a commission based vendor for online subscriptions. People really do pay to read periodicals such as the Wall Street Journal or National Geographic online. Imagine a portal where you have consolidated online subscription access all in one place! 3. Online Shopping Partnership: The Post Office has already got on the band wagon with EBay and PayPal to incorporate Postal shipping into their websites. Why not take an aggressive approach to partner with the five biggest online retailers; Amazon, Dell, Office Depot, Staples and HPDirect. There are thousands of online retailers up for grabs! 4. Incorporate existing USPS.com services with the portal. You can already track a package from the Postal website. Imagine someone being able to buy a book from Amazon.com, ship through the Post Office and get shipping alerts sent to their Postal e-mail address. That's creating multiple sources of revenue from one transaction!

    Nov 25, 2010
  • anon

    I've been a rural carrier for 7 years with the last 4 months as a 204b. Almost everyone in the postal service works harder and more efficiently than in any other business I've worked in (including non profits, superior courts, albertons, hospitality, and private business). The supervisors and postmasters are necessary and most are just trying to do what they're told and get the results HQ wants. And therein lies the problem. Most upper level management are so far removed from craft that they do not even realize that they are implementing procedures that are archaic and getting results that are not acheiving their goals. Many of the ideas I read here were ones I have thought and can prove will work. Here are ones involving shipping since that's what we do: 1. Implement what so many employees suggested-modern vending machines that work and automatic weight and scan machines that customers can utilize without waiting in line that weigh and/or scan their parcels into the mailstream. 2. Make the scans reflect useful information which can be accessed easily by customers and shippers - isn't that what they are for. For instance, why are the carriers scanning anything not delivered or notified as Undeliverable as addressed and then leaving clerks to scan them as forwards, no such number, insufficient address or whatever. Even worse carriers don't have to scan pickups at all so nobody knows when and where the mailpiece enters the mailstream. 3. Let customers and shippers choose whether they want the shipping information accessed easily. Don't assume, as we do now, that everyone wants that info kept secure. They don't-they all want to be able to access their information easily. Let them opt in or out of privacy at the time they pay. It wastes an enormous amount of time for customers, shippers, carriers, and supervisors to wade through the process of finding out what's really happened to their shipment. 4. (And I'll stop here but the list is endless). Figure out what everyone wants and give it to them if you can. Customers want accurate and simple to understand info showing exactly how they can benefit from USPS. Let people pay bills through usps with cash for a $1.00 fee and have it posted immediately to their account (I call it imail with each participating company having a scan mark like an eye). Finally it's important to note that there is a small window of opportunity before other companies or agencies provide what we cannot and become the communication link between people, business, and government that we are supposed to be. Thank you.

    Oct 24, 2010
  • anon

    How about if post offices were opened every other day to save on overheads?

    Oct 07, 2010
  • anon

    It was a beneficial workout for me to go through your webpage. It definitely stretches the limits with the mind when you go through very good info and make an effort to interpret it properly. I am going to glance up this web site usually on my PC. Thanks for sharing

    Sep 28, 2010
  • anon

    its to far gone we get a new oic , 204b, supervisor, every six months, tear our office apart all for thier 991, and no one looks to see if they improved anything. there are light duty employees doing more than healthy employees buy why does light duty get rewared w/a supervisor position .

    Sep 12, 2010
  • anon

    The practice of excessive turnover of supervision is true. Twelve years in one office. Thirteen Postmasters/OIC's.Some stay a month, one stayed 3 to get high three for retirement. What is really telling is that EACH ONE reported differently the numbers. Only thing consistant was the goal to stay "off a list", which required misrepresenting the numbers. (some were better at staying off the list then others) What would be more telling is if someone actually looked at the chronological order of all 991's from those that came through this particular office. How many times can the office be so bad that each one passing through corrected all the errors? (understandably a waste of time to do, just wanted to paint a picture of the absurdity) On a serious note, there are no retractions of web-based accesses to offices once a person leaves their assignment. A person that has access in an office should have it retracted after they leave or are removed. Someone forgot that upper mobile people are not above sabatoging their competition in moving upward.

    Dec 07, 2010
  • anon

    USPS should standardize their web pages with non-proprietary industry standards so that all customers and employees may use it's web services without being discriminated against. For example, I am an employee and wish to access the eOPF website https://eopf.usps.gov/eOPF/jsp/essLogin.jsp I do not own a windows computer, nor do i want to bother anyone to use their computer, or use a public terminal which many people share and is more likely to be infected with viruses, key loggers ect. Visiting this site results in an error saying I MUST use an ancient web technology "ActiveX" (are you serious? who uses this anymore?). People like me who no longer trust/put-up with microsoft windows now use Linux and/or Macs are being left out from using the tools we need. Similarly, Linux and Mac using customers are being left out. If we non-windows users try to use USPS on-line services such as "USPS shipping assistant" which requires windows This may not directly save money, but If you create obstacles like this, employees will be frustrated and unhappy. And this will definitely reflect in their work, ultimately costing USPS money. And happy customers will definitely come back and give us more of their business.

    Sep 10, 2010
  • anon

    REENERGIZE FASCINATING STAMPS The Post Office can nurture a long-term love of stamps---as an artform, educational tool and habit-forming hobby. Starting with schools, provide maps of the United States and World, which have slots to be filled in with stamps for each State or Country. Designer stamps, which are linked to pop culture and contemporary hot news, can be rolled out incrementally or sold as limited edition packs.

    Jul 27, 2010
  • anon

    Is management really care about their expenses. Two months ago we just notice that USPS San Francisco in Evans St. have more than 25 new cars (Ford Focus). Wherein half of it stayed in the parking lot for the whole day.How can employee believe that we are losing money if management doesn't know how to spent our money wisely?Please investigate right away since the cars still have value for selling.

    Jul 02, 2010
  • anon

    I believe the USPS should link a permanent email address to the postal customer's physical address. Electronic mail should be addressed exactly as physical mail. The email address should remain hidden from the users, accessible to the recipient by user name and password, and to the sender by street address. Electronic mail unopened after several days would be printed by the post office and physically delivered, provided the sender paid for the service.

    Jun 29, 2010
  • anon

    I submitted an idea for the Postal Service 2000 "Ideas contest" to improve/save the Postal Service. As I am sure many thousand of others did. There should be a wealth of great suggestions, already archived. My idea was to have a computer in every Postal lobby, exclusively to order stamps, and mail order items for our customers, who either did not have, or did not want to use their credit card. They could order and pay the clerk at the window. The Postal Service would receive affiliate income from our "partners". Also increased revenue from parcels.

    Jun 14, 2010
  • anon

    Something went wrong with submitting last comment. We try again: <a href="http://postalsanity.com/2010/06/smart-phone-apps-increase-sales-of-usps-hybrid-postcards/" rel="nofollow">Smart phone apps increase sales of USPS hybrid postcards</a> http://postalsanity.com/2010/06/smart-phone-apps-increase-sales-of-usps-hybrid-postcards/

    Jun 14, 2010
  • anon

    You may want to read our latest suggestion for USPS at the following link: &lt;a href=&quot;http://postalsanity.com/2010/06/smart-phone-apps-increase-sales-of-usps-hybrid-postcards/&quot;Smart phone apps increase sales of USPS hybrid postcards</a>

    Jun 14, 2010
  • anon

    Southwest Michigan has too many offices close together. On Red Arrow Highway starting from New Buffalo PO, drive 4 miles north you come to the Union Pier PO. Drive 1 mile!.. you come to Lakeside PO. Drive 2 miles you come to Harbert PO. From there you are only 1.5 miles from Sawyer PO. From Sawyer you are 2 miles from New Troy PO. It's insane! All of the mom &amp; pop gas stations and grocery stores closed in this area 30 years ago because there was no population to support them. Now there are fewer people. (70% of homeowners in this area live and receive their mail in Chicago). The USPS is way behind on their office closings. If this is happening across the country, this could be the reason they are going broke. Plus they rent the buildings. When has it ever made sense to rent a house or car long term? NEVER!

    Jun 02, 2010
  • anon

    I think similar to ATM machines and Vending machines it is feasible to have Auto Mail Box machines. This machine can be installed at large apartment complexes, so the mail man instead of opening hundred mail boxes only needs to load up one big box (loading box of the machine). The loading box can be loaded at post offices, and only be inserted to the machines by postmen). The machine should be made smart saving the postman’s time to load it. Like ATM Cards, each resident will have a Mailing card to swipe it at the machine and receive her/his mails.

    May 19, 2010
  • anon

    How about getting every neighborhood fitted with a box section. No more door to door deliveries. This way the carrier saves on time and gas and every neighborhood would have a drop off for their outgoing mail. We have the best and least corrupt mail delivery system in the world so I would not like to see the mail system go public with non-postal employees delivering mail. Of course the idea of raising bulk mail rates is vary apealing but I don't know much about bulk mail. Cut back on over time by hiring substitues that are on call. Like they do with the school system...if a teacher is absent they call in a sub. Well if you have a lot of mail...call in a sub and don't pay over-time.

    May 09, 2010
  • anon

    We have lots of holidays that give the general public a chance to mail a card, however, due to electronic cards that are available through email, that has definitely decreased card sending. I think we should create something through the post office such as; "National Send a Card Week," to someone you care about, or letter. We have crazy things like "sweetest day, secretaties day, boss's day, which are all great reasons to buy a card, but just something like that might hit home to alot of people. Hey, "retro" is back in a big way. Let's make sending a card or letter versus emailing some sort of "retro campaign." I also think that field trips to the post office for day care centers across America is another great idea. A child has to bring .44 cents to school to mail mom or dad or whomever a card they made in school and it's fun for them too and educational. I know I look forward to the class that comes into our post office. Get the word out to daycare centers. I hope these simple but fun ideas could help in some way. We also need to IMPROVE on our customer service skills. CSA staff meetings, incentive's, whatever it takes. Some of the clerks working the windows out there are a disgrace to the USPS. Customer service is the lifeline to a business. Have a great day.

    May 09, 2010
  • anon

    Use internet more effectively and stop leasing buildings.

    May 07, 2010
  • anon

    Significantly increase the rate for bulk mail. Companies send out so much bulk mail that they should contribute to the financial situation. I receved a letter today and the rate is listed at $00.10. I receive so much of it that a rate increase would yield additonal revenue.

    May 05, 2010
  • anon

    End Saturday delivery. Who needs mail on Saturday? The work week is Monday-Friday...and if you're in a management position its Monday-Thursday.

    Apr 30, 2010
  • anon

    Stop leasing buildings. The USPS is just paying for their buildings over and over again by leasing. Wasted money.

    Apr 30, 2010
  • anon

    close 49115, 49116 and 49119. These offices have no rural delivery and have other post offices in very close proximity for people to use.

    Apr 30, 2010
  • anon

    I'm sure the unions would not go for this, but, selling advertising space on postal vehicles will solve ALL the financial problems. Postal vehicles are on the streets four to six hours a day and prime placement for advertising. Also, cross promotions would make it more productive. For example, a "Green" energy company. USPS could promote the energy company on the side of the vehicles saying "we are environmentally conscious and use Green energy" and the energy company can promote their service by saying "we supply Green energy to the USPS". Plus, it would benefit the environment and save money on energy bills. Win, win.

    Apr 29, 2010
  • anon

    My first idea is to make all routes evaluated route times. There are far too many carriers milking their time to get into overtime or just to get more time than their route actually takes. If you evaluate the time, I guarantee they will get the route done within and in most cases in less time than the evaluated time. Case in point, a carrier may take eight and a half to nine hours to do a route on any given day. But, come Christmas eve, that route is done in six hours or less.

    Apr 29, 2010
  • anon

    Eliminate district staff. I am a lower level manager and I complete reports on the computer (on time). The district staff person in charge sends out an e mail to remind me to do it on time. I explain anything "unusual" in the comments section when I submit the report. Then the person who sent the e mail calls and asks "why" (instead of reading the comments). They then take this information and e mail to my MPOO who e mails it back to me to explain with instructions to copy the person who called me. I explain (usually with the exact same words I put on the original computer comments)---e-mail back to the MPOO and the district assignee. The next day I receive a consolidated report for the district with my comments again. I'm sure this district assignee to this project has no other function than this. This is only one example. One other staffer prepares a spreadsheet for this and another for that. Some we don't know what they do. They should be given the vacant EAS jobs instead of posting them.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    NPA has killed the Post Office. All of the programs that "measure" whether or not the upper level managers (district level) get merit bonuses. I am a Postmaster in the Alabama district and we chase our tails on a daily basis for the never ending EXFC measurement--the one that measures nothing. Nothing of any value anyway. 1, 2, or 3 pcs of mail may arrive at any time during the day but must be delivered at any cost--ANY COST. With salary, overtime, and transportation, one 44 cent letter might end up costing $200 to deliver--"just in case" it is that elusive EXFC pc. If a carrier has a flat tire and misses dispatch, their collection mail must be transported to the plant--possibly 300 miles round trip. Many other items fall into the "NPA trap" costing the USPS money all under the guise of service while really just an excuse to line the pockets of of the district manager. Most all of the problems the USPS faces could be solved with common sense--if we had any.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    I think one of the reasons why people are going electronic more than using a stamp and an envelope is because there are no mailboxes ANYWHERE in our communities. Used to be you would find a mailbox to put your letters in within at least a half a mile of home. Now with the paranoia about bombs after 9/11/2001, and then the Anthrax scare, there isn't a mailbox to be found. Therefore, I don't think its a coincidence that USPS business and revenue are going down when to mail a letter (not wanting to mail it from home mailbox because of vandals and identity thieves) is much, much more difficult. I'd go so far as to say that USPS has made themselves most un-user friendly as a result. Reinventing the community drop off boxes to make them secure and readily available would be a contribution to resolving several problems in the U.S. and for the USPS. For example, people might find it GREAT to get outside of the house and enjoy getting away from the electronic addiction e.g. paying bills online. This would save pollution from the generation of electricity. U.S. citizens might also use their cars less also reducing auto emissions (I drove 5 miles through a major metropolitan area tonight and did not see ONE letter drop off box!). Encouraging people to walk to the nearest letter drop would also contribute to many Americans' need to burn a few calories on the walk to the mailbox, thereby contributing to the reduction of the obesity epidemic in the U.S. All in all, I believe the USPS should use the "Better for Environment" strategy rather than succumb to the foregone conclusion that people would prefer to "pay online." I don't pay online, and I think the USPS makes it too darn hard to mail a letter. Mailing a letter CREATES JOBS. Not just for the USPS, but for all the places that need a warm body to post the checks to the accounts. Yes, there will always be kooks in the world that ruin it for the rest of us, but I believe that if the USPS made themselves more user friendly, the organization would not be where it is today. Perhaps review what happened to revenue after the decision to remove community drop off points after 9/11/2001. See what that did to your revenue to convince yourself that you need to go back and review whether that wasn't what started the "online" phenomenon. Thank you for putting up this forum, and for asking for comments.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    The following are money saving ideas for USPS: 1. No Saturday delivery. As with city, county, offices, what cant get done on Saturday gets done Mon - Fri always. 2. Curbside service only: Forget door to door delivery. These are modern times and driving past a box to deliver is way more effective with less staff. If residents do not like putting up a box ion front of their home, what about a set of locked boxes at the start of each neighborhood like used in apartment complexes and some gated communities? 3. If a package is sent requiring the receiver to sign for the package, don't atttempt delivery, just leave a note in their box telling them where to pick it up and sign for it. Nobody is ever home these days. 4. Like in so many states, require postal workers to take a few days of staggered furlough without pay. Hey, better than no job at all or fully lowering wages across the board, right? 5. Contract more delivery routes out to private contractors in the civilian population. Lots of folks out of work who would relish the opportunity to go back to work at a price less than USPS employee wages/benefits. 6. Require excellent performance to get a pay raise not just that time in grade has passed, Heh, in the real world, many of us have not seen a pay raise in 2 years but at least we still have a job and we are thankful.

    Apr 28, 2010

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  • 3 days 6 hours ago
    YES All Postal Carriers should wear an approved Uniform, that will identify them. But, only window clerks, city carriers and maintenance employees are getting an allotment to buy uniforms. Rural...
  • 3 days 7 hours ago
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