Background

Mail collection boxes, introduced in 1858, are used primarily to collect mail from customers. Nationwide, there were about 153,000 collection boxes at the end of fiscal year (FY) 2016; however, the U.S. Postal Service has been removing underused boxes, with about 14,000 boxes removed over the past five years. Postal Service policy requires approval by the Area and public notification in order to permanently remove a collection box.

Each district is required to enter all collection boxes in the Collection Point Management System (CPMS), a database that includes the details of collection points such as the addresses, location types (e.g., Business, Residential, Post Office Lobby), and the days and times the collection point is accessed.

The CPMS is a major source of information for management review and analysis of trends affecting collection boxes. If a collection box is temporarily unable to be collected from, a local request is made to the CPMS district administrator for the box to be placed into an out-of-service status in the system. The Postal Service allows collection boxes to be placed in an out-of-service status temporarily if they are damaged and awaiting repair, removed for a parade, or cannot be collected due to unusual circumstances. While there is no policy governing the use of the out-of-service status, according to Postal Service Headquarters, collection boxes placed in out-of-service status should be for a temporary time period.

Our objective was to assess the Postal Service’s processes for managing out-of-service mail collection boxes in the Great Lakes, Northeast, Pacific, Southern, and Western Areas. We reviewed out-of-service collection boxes in previous audit projects for the Eastern and Capital Metro areas. As of March 31, 2017, 3,221 collection boxes were in an out-of-service status greater than seven days for the five Postal Service areas. These collection boxes were in this status from as low as an average of 223 days to a high of 817 days.

What the OIG Found

The Postal Service did not always effectively manage out-of-service mail collection boxes. Our analysis of 205 statistically sampled boxes showed that 113 (55 percent) were permanently removed from the street without area approval and 102 of those (50 percent) were removed without public notification. Also, 515 employees in the five areas of operations had CPMS district level administrative privileges, which allowed them to place a box in an out-of-service status. Postal Service area management stated that generally one to three staff with this access level are sufficient to perform necessary duties. Area management indicated, of the 515 employees with administrative privileges, only 320 should continue to have access.

Additionally, while there is no policy on reporting out-of-service status, CPMS users have the ability to see reports on out-of-service boxes. However, they do not have the ability to see the date boxes were placed out-of-service or the duration they were in that status in order to monitor how long they have been out-of-service.

These conditions occurred because the Postal Service did not have policies or procedures to clearly define the purpose, appropriate use, duration, approval requirements, and need for notification to the public for out-of-service boxes. Also, managers did not perform system access privileges reviews to determine if CPMS access rights were current or appropriate. Additionally, the CPMS did not have business intelligence reports for management to more effectively, monitor, track, and manage out-of-service mail collection boxes, where appropriate.

Without clearly defined policy and procedures, the management of out-of-service boxes will not be consistently applied which may negatively impact management decisions and service to the public.

What the OIG Recommended

We recommended management establish national policies or procedures for out-of-service collection boxes to ensure consistent use, duration, and approval levels. We also recommended management communicate to managers the importance of periodic reviews of employee access levels to CPMS, and modify the system to add adequate reporting, tracking tools, and system controls.

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Comments (13)

  • anon

    I would like to report that both of the mail collection boxes in the 100 South block of Cook Street in Denver, Colorado 80209 are broken (one is broken - the slot doesn't open and the other has been jammed for several days). Thank you.

    Sep 06, 2018
  • anon

    Hi I mailed my rent out in a blue mailbox on Melrose, how do I know if the blue mailbox gets picked up or not? Or if it’s in service, I’m in California 90046. If a blue box is there it’s in service correct?

    Sep 05, 2018
  • anon

    Hello, Maryann. Thanks for your message. We are an independent agency of the Postal Service and unfortunately can't help with mail boxes. Please contact the Postal Service directly at emailus.usps.com/emailUs/iq/usps/request.do?forward=emailUs.

    Sep 05, 2018
  • anon

    Is the blue collection box on the corner of Lafayette and Classon Avenues, in Brooklyn NY 11205, active? I mailed a letter over a month ago, with correct postage. The receiving party has not gotten my letter yet. Who can I speak to about this?

    Sep 04, 2018
  • anon

    Hello, Maryann. Thanks for your message. We are an independent agency of the Postal Service and unfortunately can't help with delayed mail or packages. Please contact the Postal Service directly at emailus.usps.com/emailUs/iq/usps/request.do?forward=emailUs. Just choose the tab marked "Where is My Mail."

    Sep 05, 2018
  • anon

    I would like to have a collection mailbox outside of store, would you be willing to put one there?

    Aug 25, 2018
  • anon

    I live in Bayside, New York. I walked to a mailbox in my neighborhood(49th Ave/ Francis Lewis Blvd) and was shocked to see the eagle USPS logo was sloppily spray painted with light blue paint and the pickup information was removed. Also, the pull down handle and tray was very rusted. It looked abandoned so I didn’t drop my letter into the box. This is a lovely, well kept neighborhood. Is a mail box fitting this description out of service?

    Aug 16, 2018
  • anon

    The collection box at 1501 50th St, Bldg 1&2, West Des Moines, IA 50266 is many times so full by pickup time that no more mail can be added. How does one get another collection box or a larger collection box at a location?

    Aug 09, 2018
  • anon

    I would like to report a damaged blue collections box on the southeast corner of North Boulevard and Marion Street in Oak Park, IL as of the morning of July 31, 2018. In trying to open the little door to deposit my mail, it seemed to have come off the hinge and came down rather hard on my finger. I now have a bruise on my finger and it took a bit of effort to re-close the little door and get my mail to drop into the mailbox. I would like this not to happen to anyone else and would like this mailbox door fixed. Thank you.

    Jul 31, 2018
  • anon

    Can you please provide further information on how to get a collection box removed from the area ?

    Jul 07, 2018
  • anon

    Thanks for your message. We are an independent agency of the Postal Service and unfortunately can't help with collection box removal. You should contact your local postmaster to have the issue resolved.

    Jul 12, 2018
  • anon

    I have sent a lot of letters thru the usps blue box in the westgate mall in bethlehem pa and none of my mails have been received yet. I'd like to know if this box is working or not

    May 01, 2018
  • anon

    My name is Margaret Layne, I live in on Harris Street Catlettsburg,Ky. For years now my neighbors and I have not received our mail, just yesterday a young mother of three didn't receive her food stamps. She had to call and report that, thank God they sent her another one. My bills and other mail goes to my neighbors and I get theirs. I wrote a letter to the mailman and told him we are tried of this and if it happened again he would be reported. Well, it happened again and again. This is happening all over town. In a few years these careless postmen will not have a job because the younger generation will chose to get paperless bills on line I to have been considering this. Then they can give my neighbors my junk mail.

    Sep 13, 2017