• Reply to: Does a Hybrid Postal Model Have Merit?   1 year 9 months ago

    Unfortunately, our nation’s policymakers do not look strategically at reform of the Postal Service. It seems to me that we should be debating and deciding what universal service means in this current age of digital communications. Once we have decided this, reforming and shaping the Postal service to meet that obligation would make more sense than keeping a bloated infrastructure in place because we can’t let go of what the USPS used to be and provide. Do we really need physical delivery to the door six days a week when so much communication occurs digitally? Maybe it is time to allow the Postal Service to relax its delivery standards. It is competing with “instantaneous” messaging, and it simply can’t win on speed even with overnight delivery of first class mail. Maybe value is where it excels — and if that is the case, perhaps 50 or 60 cents for a stamp is still a good deal. It is time to revise today’s “understood” meaning of universal service and make it more relevant and realistic for the world we now live in.

  • Reply to: Does a Hybrid Postal Model Have Merit?   1 year 9 months ago

    This is not good for the American public. If this model is adopted the American public will have to pay for that last model as the most unprofitable part of the business. Why sell off the profitable pieces and keep the most expensive piece the delivery which has the least volume variable costs if you have to delivery to every house every day. Why is no one looking at the Postal Service as a fundamental service of government supported by appropriations of taxpayer money to support universal service at a low cost. Look at the privatized posts in other countries and the rates that their citizens pay. It is obvious that with privatization the costs for everyone will rise and a few individuals will make large profits. That concept is not in the best interest of the American Public.

  • Reply to: Does a Hybrid Postal Model Have Merit?   1 year 9 months ago

    Is it such a crazy thing to just freeze payments to the PAEA(Medical Benefits Pre-fund)and freeze payments to CSRS and FERS till the overages have been corrected?

  • Reply to: Does a Hybrid Postal Model Have Merit?   1 year 9 months ago

    The current proposals aren’t new and they aren’t particularly innovative; the ideology has been around for years. One might add that the only reason the proposals don’t advocate also privatizing delivery is that the current delivery infrastructure doesn’t readily add itself to that – yet. Give it a couple of years and delivery will be included in the package.
    None of these proposals acknowledge much less address the value of public goods or the necessity for maintaining neutral infrastructure. Privatizing the postal system would likely lead to monopoly or semi-monopoly control of the postal network with many of the same problems we’re currently seeing in telecommunications. I’ve written extensively on this subject including this recent post at STPO:http://www.savethepostoffice.com/betrayal-without-remedy-unwinding-postal-service

  • Reply to: Does a Hybrid Postal Model Have Merit?   1 year 9 months ago

    These proposals fall short in one key area: the mailing industry is a dying business. What private sector company would make any investment to enter this market? Where the private sector already operates — in upstream activities through worksharing — the margins are extremely thin. The consolidation within the printing industry illustrates what a shrinking industry this is.

  • Reply to: Does a Hybrid Postal Model Have Merit?   1 year 9 months ago

    One problem is the way UPS and Fedex show when the package gets to us. We have seen packages that customers call about and UPS/Fedex show that we have them, only to see them show up on a pallet from them two or three days later.
    If the packages get to us in the morning we take them out that day. If they come in after the carriers have left on their routes, the packages will go out the next day.

  • Reply to: Does a Hybrid Postal Model Have Merit?   1 year 9 months ago

    I don’t believe that….at our Post Office they are delivered the day UPS drops them off on our loading dock…at worst…if they drop them off later in the day they are then delivered the next day.

  • Reply to: Does a Hybrid Postal Model Have Merit?   1 year 9 months ago

    I’ve had small packages from UPS sent through the USPS and I can tell you that process adds a week to the delivery time. It gets to my town in 2 days and then takes a week to cross town through the USPS. That part of the system needs to be addressed with hybrid services.
    I do love the USPS, and I hope you can work it out!

  • Reply to: If you have been to a Post Office with a kiosk, but opted to wait for a clerk instead, what was the basis for your decision?   1 year 9 months ago

    There needs to be a balance between each. The Postal Service is cutting back too much on the retail help, and pushing too much to automated transactions. There are still people that want to buy stamps, or those that only send out a package once in a great while. A self checkout system is not going to do these people much good. However, they should bring back the vending machines in some of the smaller offices. The office in the town where I work had a 24 hour PO box lobby. It would be great to buy just a couple of stamps after hours when I go to pick up my mail, as ordering it online is not instant and the grocery store is a few miles away.

  • Reply to: If you have been to a Post Office with a kiosk, but opted to wait for a clerk instead, what was the basis for your decision?   1 year 9 months ago

    I’m actually a big fan of using the online click n’ ship over clerk or kiosk. I can ship and schedule a pick-up right from the comfort of home. I just wish they offered more options to ship and print postage, instead of just Express and Priority Mail.
    When I do go to the post office and have tried to use the kiosk, they are either out of order or I get through and find I need to see a clerk anyway. If I have to make the drive, I prefer to use the clerk.

  • Reply to: If you have been to a Post Office with a kiosk, but opted to wait for a clerk instead, what was the basis for your decision?   1 year 9 months ago

    I collect hand-cancellation postmarks at every post office I visit. I can’t get those at a kiosk!

  • Reply to: If you have been to a Post Office with a kiosk, but opted to wait for a clerk instead, what was the basis for your decision?   1 year 9 months ago

    I found the kiosks difficult to use, and SLOW. In many cases, it’s actually faster to go through the line. Also, the interface looks about ten years old, and uses postal terms that I’m unfamiliar with. If the kiosk worked more like the self-checkout systems, I might use it.

  • Reply to: If you have been to a Post Office with a kiosk, but opted to wait for a clerk instead, what was the basis for your decision?   1 year 9 months ago

    I like that the automated postal centers are open in the lobby of my post office after hours. It allows me to run in and take care of my postal needs on off hours. The one downside is that if you are shipping a package that is bigger than what fits in the opening of the kiosk, it requires you to stand in line or at least hand off the package to a clerk. Another nearby post office had a kiosk at one time, but then removed it. I’m not sure why and it is disappointing as that PO had more parking available. But with only one clerk working on many days, it almost always has a long line.

  • Reply to: If you have been to a Post Office with a kiosk, but opted to wait for a clerk instead, what was the basis for your decision?   1 year 9 months ago

    I much prefer the kiosk. Many employees at my local post office locations are much slower than the computer. I like to save the line for complicated shipments.

  • Reply to: If you have been to a Post Office with a kiosk, but opted to wait for a clerk instead, what was the basis for your decision?   1 year 9 months ago

    Both, Clerk and Kiosks. Yes! I feel that the automated options and the human touch thats-the-equally-right-balance.

  • Reply to: If you have been to a Post Office with a kiosk, but opted to wait for a clerk instead, what was the basis for your decision?   1 year 9 months ago

    I personally prefer to work with a person, but then I’m of that demographic that grew up without a cell phone and remembers when bank clerks knew your name.

  • Reply to: Neither Blizzards Nor Hurricanes Nor Zombies...   1 year 9 months ago

    You are absolutely right. We are tied to FEMA, state EMA’s, as well as the Centers for Disease Control. We have agreements to deliver emergency items including medical neccessities under escort of the US Marshalls if needed. That’s why I say there’s alot more to the Postal Service than the average American understands.

  • Reply to: Neither Blizzards Nor Hurricanes Nor Zombies...   1 year 9 months ago

    This is an excellent article as it deals with issues that most people never ponder until faced with a crisis. People will be expecting and looking for checks, advance payments and documents from their insurance carrier. There are a tremendous amount of documents that still need mailed and not sent via email. Some how, the USPS should be tied in to FEMA on when to deliver and when it is safe. At most storm sites, there are fema tents and instruction sites set up. I would think that the postal service would or should coordinate your services at these same sites for the people displaced. I am sure the safety of the employees is foremost. But you can never minimize the importance of mail returning some semblance of normalcy in a time of crisis. As for delivering around zombies, ….. Suggest you let management figure that one out.

  • Reply to: Neither Blizzards Nor Hurricanes Nor Zombies...   1 year 9 months ago

    I agree Tim, the penny saver is the last thing on our mind in the event of a disaster. However, I don’t think most people understand the Postal Service plays a vital role in emergency preparedness. We have expertise and knowledge unique to our organization, in that we have mastered the routes and addresses of the entire United States. In the event of a natural disaster or biological attack the Postal Service is needed to deliver information and medication to the American public. While the health and safety of our employees is always first and foremost, we are a key player in protecting the public at large. For example, in the event a public quarantine could prevent outbreak of a disease or spread of a biological agent; the Postal Service would play a vital role in delivering information and antidotes to prevent public alarm, panic and further contamination. Of course this would all be carried out in coordination with other first responders but I think we all need to recognize and respect the fact the Postal Service delivers a much larger service than distributing junk mail and penny savers.

  • Reply to: Neither Blizzards Nor Hurricanes Nor Zombies...   1 year 9 months ago

    Granted, people don’t need the pennysaver when the weather is bad, but the USPS delivers vital packages like prescription medicines. They are professional drivers and really what can’t you buy online and get delivered by USPS? Instead of everyone’s vehicle on the road picking up essentials, let the professionals deliver what you need. Stay home.

  • Reply to: Neither Blizzards Nor Hurricanes Nor Zombies...   1 year 9 months ago

    USPS should cease making employees come to work and go out delivering Mail when local governments declare a state of emergency and request only emergency vehicles be on the road. Rather than excercise federal presumption of applicable laws, USPS should recognize the good judgement of local authorities in the matter. Delivering Mail is really not a “vital service” and is not worth putting people’s lives at risk.

  • Reply to: Learning from Lean Six Sigma   1 year 11 months ago

    In my previous company (HVAC, Plumbing, Electrical) we used the Six Sigma process on many different projects. One of the most significant projects I was involved in was identifying an improved process of having parts returned for warranty reimbursement from the manufacturers. The new method had a tremendous impact on our bottom line and my bonus! I think it is a good method for breaking things down to identify where improvement lies.

  • Reply to: Does a Virtual PO Box service appeal to you?   1 year 11 months ago

    This is a great idea! It is nice to see the postal service implementing technology to find different ways to remain viable.

  • Reply to: Does a Virtual PO Box service appeal to you?   1 year 11 months ago

    i want to see my letters

  • Reply to: Does a Virtual PO Box service appeal to you?   1 year 11 months ago

    This seems like a good idea, though I wonder if mail is redirected what the delay would be like.

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