• Reply to: If you have been to a Post Office with a kiosk, but opted to wait for a clerk instead, what was the basis for your decision?   1 year 8 months ago

    I much prefer the kiosk. Many employees at my local post office locations are much slower than the computer. I like to save the line for complicated shipments.

  • Reply to: If you have been to a Post Office with a kiosk, but opted to wait for a clerk instead, what was the basis for your decision?   1 year 8 months ago

    Both, Clerk and Kiosks. Yes! I feel that the automated options and the human touch thats-the-equally-right-balance.

  • Reply to: If you have been to a Post Office with a kiosk, but opted to wait for a clerk instead, what was the basis for your decision?   1 year 8 months ago

    I personally prefer to work with a person, but then I’m of that demographic that grew up without a cell phone and remembers when bank clerks knew your name.

  • Reply to: Neither Blizzards Nor Hurricanes Nor Zombies...   1 year 8 months ago

    You are absolutely right. We are tied to FEMA, state EMA’s, as well as the Centers for Disease Control. We have agreements to deliver emergency items including medical neccessities under escort of the US Marshalls if needed. That’s why I say there’s alot more to the Postal Service than the average American understands.

  • Reply to: Neither Blizzards Nor Hurricanes Nor Zombies...   1 year 8 months ago

    This is an excellent article as it deals with issues that most people never ponder until faced with a crisis. People will be expecting and looking for checks, advance payments and documents from their insurance carrier. There are a tremendous amount of documents that still need mailed and not sent via email. Some how, the USPS should be tied in to FEMA on when to deliver and when it is safe. At most storm sites, there are fema tents and instruction sites set up. I would think that the postal service would or should coordinate your services at these same sites for the people displaced. I am sure the safety of the employees is foremost. But you can never minimize the importance of mail returning some semblance of normalcy in a time of crisis. As for delivering around zombies, ….. Suggest you let management figure that one out.

  • Reply to: Neither Blizzards Nor Hurricanes Nor Zombies...   1 year 8 months ago

    I agree Tim, the penny saver is the last thing on our mind in the event of a disaster. However, I don’t think most people understand the Postal Service plays a vital role in emergency preparedness. We have expertise and knowledge unique to our organization, in that we have mastered the routes and addresses of the entire United States. In the event of a natural disaster or biological attack the Postal Service is needed to deliver information and medication to the American public. While the health and safety of our employees is always first and foremost, we are a key player in protecting the public at large. For example, in the event a public quarantine could prevent outbreak of a disease or spread of a biological agent; the Postal Service would play a vital role in delivering information and antidotes to prevent public alarm, panic and further contamination. Of course this would all be carried out in coordination with other first responders but I think we all need to recognize and respect the fact the Postal Service delivers a much larger service than distributing junk mail and penny savers.

  • Reply to: Neither Blizzards Nor Hurricanes Nor Zombies...   1 year 8 months ago

    Granted, people don’t need the pennysaver when the weather is bad, but the USPS delivers vital packages like prescription medicines. They are professional drivers and really what can’t you buy online and get delivered by USPS? Instead of everyone’s vehicle on the road picking up essentials, let the professionals deliver what you need. Stay home.

  • Reply to: Neither Blizzards Nor Hurricanes Nor Zombies...   1 year 8 months ago

    USPS should cease making employees come to work and go out delivering Mail when local governments declare a state of emergency and request only emergency vehicles be on the road. Rather than excercise federal presumption of applicable laws, USPS should recognize the good judgement of local authorities in the matter. Delivering Mail is really not a “vital service” and is not worth putting people’s lives at risk.

  • Reply to: Learning from Lean Six Sigma   1 year 10 months ago

    In my previous company (HVAC, Plumbing, Electrical) we used the Six Sigma process on many different projects. One of the most significant projects I was involved in was identifying an improved process of having parts returned for warranty reimbursement from the manufacturers. The new method had a tremendous impact on our bottom line and my bonus! I think it is a good method for breaking things down to identify where improvement lies.

  • Reply to: Does a Virtual PO Box service appeal to you?   1 year 10 months ago

    This is a great idea! It is nice to see the postal service implementing technology to find different ways to remain viable.

  • Reply to: Does a Virtual PO Box service appeal to you?   1 year 10 months ago

    i want to see my letters

  • Reply to: Does a Virtual PO Box service appeal to you?   1 year 10 months ago

    This seems like a good idea, though I wonder if mail is redirected what the delay would be like.

  • Reply to: Does a Virtual PO Box service appeal to you?   1 year 10 months ago

    I like the idea of putting more control in the hands of the customer — even if the senders of mail might not like the idea of letting customers decide what to do with their mail before it even hits their mailbox. But I think giving customers control puts greater value on mail. If I really want what’s in my mailbox, I want it where I am going to be. If I don’t care what’s in my mailbox, I won’t sign up for Virtual PO box.

    What about another option in the Virtual PO Box of “no Saturday delivery required/hold until Monday?” This might be a way to let the Postal Service test just how necessary customers find Saturday delivery.

  • Reply to: Does a Virtual PO Box service appeal to you?   1 year 10 months ago

    Again technology is good, but technology is bad, how many jobs will this cost us. everyone is so on to this, but if it were your job on the line you probably would’nt feel this way. anyway the Postal service upper management will probably screw that up the way they screw everything else up.

  • Reply to: Does a Virtual PO Box service appeal to you?   1 year 10 months ago

    Just another way to get rid of jobs.

  • Reply to: Does a Virtual PO Box service appeal to you?   1 year 10 months ago

    This would be so GREAT! Especially for those of use who move around a lot and have mail lost because of a constantly updating address. Please implement this!

  • Reply to: Customer Experience through a Webcam   1 year 10 months ago

    It’s not all that clear how much sense it makes to have cameras monitored in a central location so that someone can call a PO and tell them the line is long. The clerks at the service windows can see that. Monitoring doesn’t help if there aren’t the resources available locally to intervene. Sending a clerk to tell customers to use self-service seems like a waste of resources.

    As for customers watching, how many customers have more than one nearby PO so that they can exercise choice? It this worked, the PO with the shorter lines would attract more business and the lines would get longer. Each PO should have a good idea of when its lines tend to be long and could post that information for the benefit of its customers.

    This may be an example of trying to use technology to do something that could be done better with a little common sense.

  • Reply to: Mail Business, Real Estate Business, or Both?   1 year 10 months ago

    Certainly, excess properties could be sold, but there needs to be some oversight to ensure that everyone’s best interests are being served. Rather than selling a property and leasing back some or all of it, why not sell it subject to the reservation of a possessory interest — in some or all of the space — for a terms of years. It would bring in a smaller sales price, short-term, but provide USPS with rent-free occupancy into the future and save money long-term.

  • Reply to: Mail Business, Real Estate Business, or Both?   1 year 10 months ago

    A sound real-estate strategy is needed. As the use of mail shrinks and the Postal Service gets leaner, it doesn’t make sense to keep under-used facilities or post offices open. Where the real estate could fetch a good price, it seems logical to consider leasing or selling it. But this has to be done in a transparent way and with the best interests of all stakeholders in mind. The Postal Service is a public entity held in the public trust, and in that regard, it is owned by the American people. Personally, I do not want to pay (through higher postage prices) for unused or underused post buildings and real estate. It is time to shrink the network to the current and future workload. But I also don’t want the Postal Service to sell properties and then use the proceeds to buy a private corporation, for example. A strategy on when and how to sell or lease, and then how the proceeds will be used is needed.

  • Reply to: Mail Business, Real Estate Business, or Both?   1 year 10 months ago

    Thanks for your input. We are in the process of developing our project plans for Fiscal Year 2014. During that process, we will discuss your comment and take it under consideration for a future project.

  • Reply to: Mail Business, Real Estate Business, or Both?   1 year 10 months ago

    The OIG should investigate the circumstances and extremely favorable terms of the exclusive contract given by USPS management to CBRE — a company chaired and largely owned by Senator Dianne Feinstein’s husband, Richard C. Blum — as well as whether that company is driving the current fire sale of prime PUBLIC properties that often contain buildings of great historic and architectural merit as well as PUBLIC art paid for by and belonging to the American people. The U.S. Post Office was created to provide a public service, not to operate as an adjunct to a giant for-profit real estate firm.

  • Reply to: Mail Business, Real Estate Business, or Both?   1 year 10 months ago

    What are the terms of the CBRE contract and who is managing this contract?

  • Reply to: Cracking the Federal Shipping Code   1 year 10 months ago

    This review is really interesting and something I have wondered about for a while. A few of the challenges – improving sales relationships and accepting more billing options – seem like they could be more easily overcome than the DoD concern about no aircraft. Is Postsl Service doing anything to get more options for billing or improving sales efforts?

  • Reply to: Cracking the Federal Shipping Code   1 year 10 months ago

    Is there anything prohibiting the Postal Service from introducing a guaranteed 2- or 3-day product? If it is meeting that standard nearly all the time anyway, it seems the potential for additional business might outweigh the risk.

  • Reply to: Cracking the Federal Shipping Code   1 year 10 months ago

    I was thinking about the lost GSA contract due to the lack of a 2-3 day shipping guarantee. I believe amazon prime, which uses UPS, also requires a 2-3 day guarantee for their 2 day shipping deal. If the post office offered the 2-3 day guarantee not only could they potentially get a lucrative GSA contract but also a lucrative amazon contract. Those two major customers may be enough to justify the marginal increase in risk from offering the 2-3 day shipping.

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