• Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 2 days ago

    Hi Inspector General

    It´s time to stop to suck stamp collectors and get serious as it still wont get USPS on the feet.
    Why don´t you concentrate on your core business instead of closing post offices and
    tricking American citizen? I got tired of your stamp policy and quit the American new issues
    and get a new issues service for peanuts for North Korean stamps and added Vietnam and
    Mongolia and I still pay less. What happens when USPS violate its own rules? You ask the
    people what they think, huh? Well here you got my answer - RESIGN and someone more competent
    can clean up the mess and consumers´ rights can be protected or maybe you want more cleaver ideas
    how to make "smart fixes". Well, no from from me budy!

    Cheers,
    Kalle

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 2 days ago

    Pure USPS greed - the $2 price of the stamps ($12) for a sheet was strictly a revenue generator. Add in the rare 'un-inverted' sheets, and I decided that collecting mint stamps wasn't for me. Of course, collecting used stamps is a challenge now that they can no longer be soaked from the envelope. USPS is definitely not stamp collector friendly.

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 2 days ago

    Concerning the upright Jenny, I am disappointed that the PO did not follow policy when it issued these stamps, although the PMG should have authority to issue a deviation. More importantly, I believe it is criminal that the postal authorities did not comply with their public commitment to disperse randomly the upright panes. Besides retaining panes at KC (Kansas City), it is my understanding that the "random" panes only went to the busiest offices. The people responsible for rigging the system should at least be fired and, preferably, be prosecuted, especially if they have since resigned.

    Going forward, I believe it would be best for the hobby if the PO stuck to only issuing stamps at face value in quantities adequate to remain on sale for a minimum period of 6 months.

    The PO should issue more APV stamps/labels. These should be expanded (using the British Royal Mail "Post and Go" stamps as an example to follow) both in terms of varying the stock and the values.

    Concerning the imperforate press sheets of commemoratives that are issued routinely in very limited quantities, these imperf stamps should be made available in standard sheets the same size as sheets of the normal stamps. Most of the press sheets are too expensive for the average collector. To pretend that the press sheets are intended for interior decorators , in my opinion, is nonsense. If I want a conventional sheet of any of these stamps, I have to buy them from a dealer at about 3x face value - I am not willing to do this.

    I find that the packaging of stamps which I buy from KC should be improved. Too often, the sheet of cardboardwithin the transparent packet is not large enough to protect the stamps and sheet corners and edges get wrinkled in the mail. Usually, I ask my local post office th exchange the stamps, if they have them in stock.

    I do not enjoy buying stamps from KC. The people who take the orders by phone are not at KC and do not understand philatelic needs. They may record special requests but these rarely make it to the person who fills the order. When following up with staff at KC, most of the time, again, I encounter people who are not sympathetic to collectors' quality requirements. Years ago, when it first opened, KC was the Philatelic Bureau and staff were trained appropriately; occasionally, I am lucky and encounter one of the old-timers and then all goes smoothly. My recommendation is that a dedicated philatelic team be established at KC. It is my opinion the the PO's chronic need to save money is costing it money because of loss of orders due to inadequate customer service.

    I hope this helps

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 2 days ago

    At first blush, the Un-inverted Jenny sheet idea was very exciting - even to this 71 year old - lifelong colector who still fondly remembers the 1956 Fipex Show in New York City. The US stamp program oftentimes falls into the malaise of boring, familiar commemorations & kiddie issues. One of the adrenaline-rush aspects of collecting is the "hunt". Just the possibility of obtaining one of the limited edition sheets was quite exciting. That feeling, however, did not last long. Realizing the slim-to-none chance of acquisition, euphoria changed to bitter anger. Completeness, you see, is quite imortant to us. Sure, only one collection can technically be complete ( i.e. the Z grill ), but this was on more obstical to the endevour.
    The USPS can still salvage this mistake. You got it right for the Dag Hamersholdt & the Legends of the West issues by making the issues available to all colectors. You'll make a lot of us very happy !
    Thanks,
    Grampa Bill

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 2 days ago

    I thought the idea was unique but have been deeply disappointed to learn that some panes were given out as "gifts". How could those panes have been found if they had been distributed "randomly"? Clearly the panes were NOT distributed randomly and thus this project has left the USPS with a "black eye".
    This project should never be repeated again. This is no better than the Circus stamps that you could only buy if you purchased the year album. The USPS is making it harder for collectors, no wonder there are fewer young collectors of US stamps.

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 2 days ago

    The USPS should be held accountable to their own rules; this organization should NOT be in the business
    of creating intentional rarities. The "upright Jenny" program as it was implemented should never have been allowed to happen - HORRIBLE idea! Stamp collectors have for decades been loyal supporters of the US stamp program and have maintained a mutually beneficial relationship. But no longer - the USPS seems determined to destroy that relationship. Go back to issuing stamps with appropriate designs, that can be easily soaked off in water, and are widely circulated - available to everyone who wants them. Other nations are winning awards for their beautiful, well-designed stamps; it's too bad that, with few exceptions, our are so poorly designed, and are in a few cases, downright ugly!

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 3 days ago

    There is no need to generate interest among the non-collecting world. The reason collecting is down is that the things that most attract collectors have been systematically removed from release; namely engraved stamps featuring mostly if not entirely American history and accomplishments of Americans. The Post Office has gone for cheaply made self-adhesive issues that look more like a child's sticker than a stamp. The attempt to be more culturally aware has backfired; why did we honor a non-American artist from Mexico who disliked this nation? The Post Office is acting like a musical group that changes style to follow "fads". It attracts new people but alienates the very fans that got the group where it is. There should be no artificially created rarities, no collectables that are available only in annual collections. And for heaven's sake, can't we force the printers of self-adhesive stamps to properly roulette issues so that individual stamps can be easily detached? I'd tear up any contract where the printers can't manage this. Finally, no commemoratives of living people. Imagine the uproar today if the post office had issued a set of "living comedians" that included Bill Cosby? The reason we wait for a time after death is to make sure there were no skeletons in the honoree's closet.

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 3 days ago

    Utterly dumbfounded. Like others have already said, the USPS should not be in the business of creating rarities. All items produced should be available to the general public, no matter the variation of any of them. An idiotic proposal that unfortunately came to fruition.

  • Reply to: What’s an Internet of Postal Things?   1 week 3 days ago

    Hi! Today morning i checked may mail box and i found key in it which is for the locker (i don't kw what it call as ). The locker number was not easily recognizable and i thought that key might be for the locker below may mailbox. Now the key is stuck in wrong locker and i haven't my package. What should I do? Or will the postman solve the issue. Not getting what to do

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 3 days ago

    I didn't even know about it until I saw the news piece on CBS Sunday Morning where they were talking about the man who bought hundreds of the sheets so he could find one of the upright sets. I didn't think it was a BAD thing that the postal service did, but I did think they did an awful job getting the word out about it. In my opinion, collectors, buying stamps to keep, taking them out of service, have been keeping the postal service afloat for years. I think they should do more - such as "limited editions" that they might sell out of - targeted to collectors. Like movies, book characters, cats, dogs, birds, butterflies, etc. Thanks for asking.

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 3 days ago

    USPS should not be in the business of creating rarities. You rightly pointed out that was a violation of USPS's own rules. There is a simple step that could help create the new collectors that USPS needs to help sustain the hobby. That would be to once again produce stamps that are soakable. By printing stamps on paper that allows a used stamp to be soaked off envelopes, USPS would create a way for their stamps to be used twice. Once for postage and then saved by collectors. It is the way that thousands of youngsters became stamp collectors. It would reinvigorate the hobby for collectors - old and new assuring USPS of a strong and growing collector base.

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 3 days ago

    I think that issuing only one hundred upright sheets was a real mistake. To add excitement to the release no fewer than 100,000 should have been issued to give collectors a reasonable chance of buying one from the Postal Service. I don't think it is too late to reprint the upright Jenny sheets. You could change the date on each stamp from 2013 to 2015 so that the original rarity could still be distinguished from the reprint. But then everyone could have one.

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 3 days ago

    Personally, I thought the upright Jenny was a great idea. I purchased panes of the stamps that I would not have otherwise bought, solely in hopes of snagging one. Unfortunately, I was buying them from the Stamp Fulfillment Center, which we now learn was not putting them in circulation. I will buy future ones over-the-counter. I use the Jennies on the rare occasions when I have to send a Certified Mail item.

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 3 days ago

    I oppose issuance of stamps that are not generally available to all who wish to purchase them. I have collected for over 40 years, and have tried to maintain a complete collection of US stamps. However, the upright Jenny as well as last year's special Circus Poster stamp that was available only to collectors who bought the USPS's year set have left two holes in my otherwise collection that is complete back to about 1940. The USPS has gotten me to reconsider whether I ought to continue to collect new issues.

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 3 days ago

    It is one of the best ideas to come out of the USPS for a while. It has given the hobby lots of publicity among the general public. Let's do this about every five years or so for a special occasion stamp. And also, forget the youngsters, we should focus our attention on middle age.d people who are more likely to be taking up a new hobby and who have money and time to spend on the hobby of stamp collecting

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 3 days ago

    I spent over $600.00 buying several inverted Jenny souvenir sheets so I could find just ONE of the Un-inverted varieties. I wanted to find an Un-inverted stamp sheet so bad because I could sell the mint sheet and use the money from the sale to buy a house for my wife and kid since we live in tight two bedroom apartment. I was never able to find one and my dreams have all but gone up in smoke. Then I read in Linns that two people who bought some of the Jenny invert stamps got randomly picked to receive the special Un-inverted stamps while I was spending nearly every spare dollar I could get just to find one. Say what !? Why couldn't I have been picked to receive one!? For years I have been buying stamps from the USPS and the back of the my philatelic catalog it says that I am a loyal and valued customer to them. My family and I have been struggling to get into a house since we've been married because my job doesn't pay enough and we need to show the bank that we have saved up enough cash - the opportunity to obtain one of these Un-inverted souvenir sheet varieties could have been the ticket and changed our lives.

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 4 days ago

    At first, I was very excited about the upright Jenny's. That is, until I read about USPS randomly sending them out to customers who ordered online. I felt cheated in a way as the chance of pulling one became much harder. I decided to use all that I had collected to send gifts to my family. I don't think I would collect something similar in the future.

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 4 days ago

    I think the Postal Service should get out of the business of intentionally trying to create collectibles. They should issue stamps that are collectible and not collectibles that are stamps. Having an issue that can't be reasonably obtained by the public should be outside the bounds of a postal service entity. Further, as more information is revealed on this item, it apparently wasn't as random as originally indicated but rather some were held back to distribute in other ways.

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 4 days ago

    I used to think the government was a body of individuals you could trust to make good decisions and do what is right for the people. At least that's what I worked for as a government employee for 36 years... The US Postal Service has an amazing job every day delivering mountains of mail and parcels, and they are trying to do it without tax dollars to keep it solvent. I must say for the difficulty they must be facing they are doing a terrific job of it. However, now with the distribution of postage stamps made in direct violation of its own rules, I have to question the leadership of the postal service and its decision on the two dollar inverted bi-plane stamp. Does anyone think that introducing this intentional "error" stamp will increase the interest of new collectors? I fear all you have done is drive more collectors and potential collectors away. Where do new collectors come from, children! Start them young.. But what child is going to shell out $12.00 (and who knows how many times) to try and secure the error pane. Very short sighted of the postal service leadership. IT'S ALL ABOUT THE MONEY... Nothing else...

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 4 days ago

    I think it was a good idea, but it has been very poorly implemented.

    I feel cheated and lied to by the USPS, considering that they are stil in possession of a good portion of the "upright" sheets, and they were not all randomly distributed as promised. I figured some sheets would be randomly inseted into the online sales mix, but I read that this is not the case. I was basically buying lottery tickets with no chance to win.

    How many are still known to be in USPS posession, and what does the USPS intend to do with these?

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 4 days ago

    American philatelists would benefit greatly if there were actual philatelists working for the post office. Nothing is worse than being greeted at the local post office by employees who don't even like their jobs, let alone stamps. And the senior management of the USPS is no better. The sole purpose of the non-inverted Jenny was to generate income from collectors, rather than provide them with an affordable collectible. For me, it has been a slow torture to see how the USPS has destroyed the hobby. Stamps are issued for people unworthy of recognition. There is no longer an artistic quality to the stamps themselves. Worst of all, you can't even soak a stamp off an envelope any longer. The cheapest and easiest way to start a kid in the hobby is with free used stamps that arrive in the mail. Oh, one more thing I want to complain about. Since 1981, National Stamp Collecting Month has been October, not September. Couldn't you even get that right?

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 4 days ago

    It left a bad taste in my mouth from the initial announcement. Creating a rarity. Providing "giveaways" to select customers. Not letting the public know of the promotion. Not letting the public know of what chances there were in acquiring a pane (i.e. only sent to high volume post offices in select markets; and the USPS apparently knows what "rare" panes are to be "seeded" into the SFS purchases ... and the list goes on. I suspect it goes against virtually every postal regulation related to philately that was ever written.

    Even for those who didn't luck out in acquiring a rarity, the regular issued panes had many printing anomalies that were not up to USPS standard with smeared ink and missing components of the plane, etc., that were unintentional perhaps, but not up to the quality control standards of the printing company contracted to make these stamps.

    If the USPS analyzes the number of panes sold versus their goal, only about half of the panes were purchased, even with the promotional gimmick included. That should be statement enough that stamp collectors were not pleased with this fiasco.

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 4 days ago

    I believe the issue that discouraged new stamp issue collectors is not about the intentional upright biplanes, but the distributing method that was unfair. The randomly selected recipients may or may not be a philatelist.
    As a collector of new issues around the world, I would suggest USPS to look into and follow some successful examples by other postal administrations. Most notably, New Zealand Post's "Kiwi Collector Reward" program is one that specifically designs to reward loyal collectors. Through accumulating points based on how much one's purchased in the last calendar year, one could redeem special philatelic gifts at beginning of each year. I firmly believe USPS's good intention to promote philately could follow similar path.

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 4 days ago

    A true philatelic rarity does not happen "intentionally", but is usually known and publicized through individual's long term collecting, constant learning, and discovering. The 100 upright Jenny panes were created intentionally, which is different from a typical stamp printed with error, or "unintentionally" printed but "intentionally" distributed through philatelic promotional means (such as the 1994 legends of the west recalled sheets). There are several recent/modern philatelic rare product examples, however, the distribution through random and/or "lottery" process (including give away to random collectors) does not motivate ordinary stamp collectors to buy as many panes as one's budget allows, in order to own one of the 100 panes in existence. I sincerely suggest that USPS to promote this type of modern philatelic limited edition stamp (not product such as the 2013 inverted jenny collector's edition stamp book) by a limited time only, first come, first served basis. This would ensure fairness, and reward true long-term philatelist a chance to own the special desirable item.

  • Reply to: Jenny Come Lately   1 week 4 days ago

    I want the USPS to STOP manufacturing rarities for revenue. Philatelic rarities should be just that, an accident, not an on purpose.

    And as with many collectors, I do not want to see living movie stars on stamps again, i.e. the Harry Potter stamps. I know that some rules have changed but stamps have traditionally honored citizens after death. Can you imagine the lobbying to be on a stamp among people with huge egos? Why would Donald Trump, or some other narcissit, not generate enough petitions to be on a stamp?

    Please make the USPS obey some standard rules.

    Thank you.

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