• Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    I work with a manager who condones us caseing the dps and guess what we clean up the route and all the issues ie fowards vacations est before we goto the street i carry 1 bundle of mail so i have a hand free for hand rails when i climb stairs it takes 2 min to load my crv when i leave because i dont have bringbacks when i come back it actualy takes the 5 min given to clean up when i get back. and all the while i can carry an extra 30 min to an hour in undertime every day to help out.
    i understand the argument that it takes to long to case dps i realy do but that was baised on when we had 6-10 trays a day but if i only have 1-3 now it can be cases in 30-40 mins but this saves 5 mins loading my van 1-2 mins putting emptys away when i get back 1-2 mins on every swing sorting it before i goto the swing (25 swings) i have 30-40 mins standing at the back of my van and and the biggest time savings i have is I CAN WALK MY ROUTE AND PAY ATTENTION THIS MAKES A 15 MIN SWING INTO 7-8 MINS SAVING ME OVER AN HOUR A DAY ON THE STREET. Yes i am happy with one bundle my fingers dont hurt. I wish someone would stop saying it is a national policy and let an office try it with todays mail in our office we could cover 1-3 routes a day in undertime and be happy with it
    please just give it a try
    85% of out office would be happy to step up the other 15% let them do it the old way they are the old ones anyway
    on a side note this also lets the clearks spread the dps misorts in the afternoon when they have down time alowing them to get the morning mail spread faster

    And hay this is the OGI website so call if i can help

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    I dont know what kind sitrep ya'll r in... dps from the start was just a pain because nobody likes change, but since dps would out stick anybody with error rate, u cannot deny the positive affect it has had on the service, i like to get out of the office at 9 and back by 330...if it got me out by 8 id still b glad to pick up the xtra deliveries and carry on...just think...that less dealin with mgt, and then we can cut mgt almost out of the picture...they r there cus they want a cush job...well ill b the first one to smile when they have to come back to craft. i know i come home everynite and sleep well cus ive done a job well

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    What about the PO working with the NALC? Soon as Young is gone maybe the NALC will get more teeth. But the M-41 has never been revised to reflect DPS, because the PO wants to do things their way, be damned the union and the Letter Carriers. There will always be a residual bundle. How many carriers will be involved in deciding how that will be handled. The M-41 says, flats are carried in the bag, period. What about the residual bundle, and then on days when there are advo's, is that 3 bundles in the bag?

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    The vast majority of injury claims filed with OWCP over the years, and continuing today, are claims from postal employees - and, the vast majority of those are from injured letter carriers. Actually, 54% of all injury claims filed with OWCP are filed by postal employees.

    Is this because postal employees are malingering? Just trying to get something for nothing? A SMALL SMALL percentage of these may fall into that category, but it is hard to fool physicians and OWCP.

    Most of the public, the vast majority of claims examiners at OWCP, most postal management, and certainly many physicians just cannot understand the toll on a persons body that delivering walking city routes while carrying a shoulder strung mail bag can produce over a period of years...much less 25 years or more. And, this is with only 4 to 6 hours on the street each day.

    Can you imagine the effects of walking delivery routes for 7 to 8 hours daily over a period of years? Repeatedly torn ligmaments. Worn out cartilage. Joint tissue torn over and over and over. First you have repeated sprains and strains. Then you have permanent damage. And finally, you have arthritis in your hips, knees, ankles, and feet that will remain with you for the remainder of your life.

    The solution? Earlier retirement ages for carriers - or, a change in job practices that will help eliminate repeated damage to joints from cumulative trauma.

    If you're young now and in good health you will not be able to see the light here - but, if you're like me and 50 or over you completely understand what I am saying.

    Did you hire on to work the mail? Yes. Did you hire on to permanently damage your body? I don't think so. We only live one time - there are no do-overs.

    Rick Owens
    Postal Employee Network

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    I was thinking of so, so many things to "chime in on". I was a carrier in the first, on line DPS station in the nation & it has been nothing but a pain in the butt since. The errors & Stalin-like mentality of management about "touching the DPS" is insane (see I am already starting to rant!) Whats the use? I have only 237 calendar days to go & 100 of those will be days off, vacation, holidays, so why bother? The post office & the goons that run it think they are Gods gift to mankind & will NEVER listen to the people that actually touch & deliver the mail... and to hell with the customer! Its all about their numbers for their PFP bonus. We can't even use the DPS input sheets for hold-outs, numbers rule. Anyway I am leaving and none to soon.

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    There is still residual mail to be cased with DPS and will be the same with FSS. And management should stop pushing default mail into the DPS to inflate percentage. 7hr will be very tough on the carriers

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    It is typical postal logic to believe that the quantity of something is better than the quality of something. Customers want quality service. USPS has spent so much money on automation that it has brainwashed itself into believing it works. Sure savings are made from the elimination of clerks with these automated machines. But the quality of delivery has all but diminished. Mail is being delivered to vacant houses, moves are not being forwarded, etc... As carriers are the guinea pigs of these brilliant postal ideals, injuries continue to rise. How is the postal service going to handle dog warning cards, msp cards, vacant notices, vacation holds, customer request cards, etc... the attitude the post office takes is just deliver the mail and let the customer deal with the problem. This can be an ongoing discussion but why waste time since management already does a good job of it. If we try to think this out a little, we should realize that USPS generates revenue to try to offset it cost. Not many federal agencies generated revenue to pay its expenses. Agencies that don't generate revenue in a sense lose money and tax payers pick up the tab.

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    Obviously the writer of this article has drank the Kool Aid. I have worked with DPS since the beginning and it is the worst technology invented. I wanted it to work as much as the Postal Service but in 10 plus years or how ever long it has gotten worse. It is the only technology in the history of mankind that has gotten worse with time. Imagine if airplanes or cars had gotten worse over time. I can only imagine how bad the flats will be. It is a total lie when management talks about the percentage of mail that is in DPS. When you account for the drastically reduced mail volume, carriers today a lot of times are casing more mail than we did when DPS just started. Just today I had a mailing of perfectly addressed letter-size nearly full coverage mailing and it should have been in DPS, but of course it wasnt. It had to be cased...all 702 pieces of it. And it was in no order at all, although it had been delivered to the Postal Service in perfect sequence. It is poor management like this that borders on criminal that has killed the Postal Service. Every forward thinking person knew years ago that the internet would have its greatest affect on First Class letters yet mangement designed DPS machines that basically can only handle business type first class envelopes, ther precise type of mail that we hardly get any more. So bring the FSS on and then prepare to close the gates!

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    "more time dedicated to delivering the mail will" get carriers back in 8? This author is obviously uneducated. Doesn't matter how you divvy up the pie, if the total is more than 8, carriers work more than 8.

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    I forsee many more stress/strains injuries/fractures from being on the street for so long. This type of system does reduce office casing time, but the increase of time on the street will take a terrible toll on the letter carriers body. I carried 11 years and had to get out and get into doing something else for the Postal Service. I have had surgery for torn rotator cuffs (left and right) two total knee replacements and I have two more surgeries to go on my feet. I also have lost at least 4 finger joints from gripping and casing the mail to arthritis. And I was in the office 4 hours and on the street 4 hours! Carrying mail was the greatest job I ever had, but I am afraid for our letter carriers today. This will take a real toll on their bodies.

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    I don't believe that this is an accurate portrayal of what a Carriers office or street time entails or would entail. DPS mail is not a perfect product, there is residual mail which is kicked out of the machines which needs to be cased and taken to the road by the carrier as a second bundle. This creates a juggling act of sorts, DPS letters, Residual letters, FSS flats, FSS residual flats and on occasion a box holder. 4 or 5 bundles of mail to handle for each delivery. Barnum and Bailey Circus might appreciate this feat but not the carriers who are required to perform this daily. Also DPS is intermingled with Missent, Missorted P.O. Box, forwardable mail etc which was not removed from the DPS stream and also has to be handled and pulled out by the carriers while trying to sort threw the 4 or 5 bundles of mail at the delivery point. Too bad we only have 2 hands. The Postal Service needs to concentrate on perfecting the DPS and FSS product given to the Carriers before rolling out a imperfect system. As usual in its haste to improve its numbers and bottom line$$ the Postal Service foolishly puts the cart in front of the horse which inevitably fails and is put on the shoulders of the Carrier.

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    Some consideration should be given to the added time the carriers will be on the street carrying the mail. Not just from a productivity stand point, but from a injury standpoint. With carriers spending up to seven hours on the street carrying mail (walking routes) for an extra two to three hours, how will this impact necks, shoulders, backs, and knees?

  • Reply to: Options for the Postal Service   4 years 10 months ago

    Hire & promote within-there are thousands of postal workers with college and graduaute degrees. Select non-partisan panel to pick the best-not the best connected.

    The postal service will not be in this mess if they had selected non-partisan panel to hire the best educated and with needed skills for the jobs instead of well connected. The jobs are given to one with less qualifications but best known to higher ups. I had considered that improving education would give me opportunity to serve my organization better but I guess they don't need that.

  • Reply to: Click-N-Ship® — Have You Used It?   4 years 10 months ago

    I have used “Click-N-Ship® " many times and I think it is a great inovation but the 5½ X 8½ label is too large for some of the mailing containers I want to use. Why not modify the software to accommodate a 4-up label on a 8½ x 11 sheet. Avery does make that label?!

  • Reply to: Use of Industry Best Practices in Processing Parcels   4 years 10 months ago

    The Postal Regulatory Commission has approved the Summer Sale, so it looks as though it will happen.

  • Reply to: Use of Industry Best Practices in Processing Parcels   4 years 10 months ago

    Thank you, Anonymous.

  • Reply to: The OIG Wants to Know How You Feel about Sick Leave   4 years 10 months ago

    Sick leave is part of our compensation package as is our pay and annual leave. If you earn it, you should be allowed to either use it or be paid for it. Like our salaries, it is accounted for when making the budgets and calculating the cost for our services. There are two main problems related to the use of sick leave. The first problem is not employees using sick leave but employees using unscheduled sick leave. When people call in unscheduled it does put a burden on the rest of the operation and can result in extra costs to get the mail out (overtime). The second problem is the one often cited by higher level management and that is that many people earn sick leave at one rate, save it as requested, and then use it later in their career when it is paid out at a higher rate. I would like to see accounts set up for each employee like a TSP account. Put the amount of money you earn for your sick leave into that account each pay period. Have the accounts accrue interest that will at least match the whatever contractual raise you get every year. If you need to use it later, it has gone up in value to meet your current rate. If you save your sick leave until you retire, you get to keep what is in the account (after all, you earned it as part of your compensation). I think the postal service could easily find a bank or financial institution to make this work.

  • Reply to: Use of Industry Best Practices in Processing Parcels   4 years 10 months ago

    ncjosh, thanks for your comments on visibility and automation.

  • Reply to: Use of Industry Best Practices in Processing Parcels   4 years 10 months ago

    although the poster above has it nailed as to why we didnt get a good head start on parcels, when in the world are we going to stop wasting time and have end to end scanning? i think that ALONE would grab 5% or more market share, i can guarantee the one thing that kept people on the fence during the 90/90 blitz was the pure face they had no consistency or visibility as to where their packages are after then send them off. why cant the carriers do a simple scan as picked up when they in face pick them up? as i have said before that would help so many people that ship and receive things from ebay and many others.

    also while i understand the need for space for the new fss machines, why in the world dont we have large machines like ups and fedex have that sort and scan packages, at many thousands per hour, requiring very few people, getting a machine say at one bmc like ups has could easily get rid of hundreds of people if implemented correctly, as you would need a dumper and a few to change out the hampers or cages, no keyers, nobody reading magazines, all machine, and this would easily add end to end scanning, also allowing the diversion of outgoing from many p&dcs all into one bmc to scan, sort and dispatch back to each ao or back to the p&dcs. why arent we doing this?

  • Reply to: Use of Industry Best Practices in Processing Parcels   4 years 10 months ago

    The short answer would probably be that very few people realized the impact the internet would have on First-Class Mail, even into the late 80's. FCM, although declining, still represents a significant portion of USPS volumes. The only room for the "new guys" to even get a foot hold was in the parcel moving business when they were gearing up in the 1970's and 1980's. Opportunity lies now in on-line shopping and resultant parcel shipping/reverse logistics, ironically also a result of our internet-dependent culture.

    None of that is news...so back to "how can we cut costs and increase parcel processing productivity now?" Any ideas?

  • Reply to: Use of Industry Best Practices in Processing Parcels   4 years 10 months ago

    Unions have won many battles but are at risk of losing the war. The USPS is headed the way of Detroit and the US Auto industry if it cannot get a better handle on labor costs. I've seen automation turned off because "the contract states" x number or % of mail processing employees need to be utilized during a given tour in a plant. How can a business compete like this? The old game of pitting craft against management needs to change and we need a partnership working toward the same goal if the USPS is to survive. By trying to save (or create) as many union members as possible, the Unions run the risk of sending them all to the unemployment line. A dose of perspective and reality is called for IMHO.

  • Reply to: Use of Industry Best Practices in Processing Parcels   4 years 10 months ago

    Hi, Anonymous. Good observation; right-sizing the network would result in higher volume densities at consolidated facilities, which would in turn increase productivity and save Postal Service dollars. Thank you for your comment

  • Reply to: Use of Industry Best Practices in Processing Parcels   4 years 10 months ago

    I don't understand why USPS built out the BMC infrastructure in the '70s to handle parcels, only to give up on the parcel business right as the internet and e-commerce were taking off. Someone had the right idea...but we failed to execute. Does anyone know why the USPS let FedEx and UPS take 87% of the market? Is there a legal reason? Lobbies? Political? Imagine having only 25% of that business...we would be scrambling to find bodies to process and deliver rather than offering a VERA.

  • Reply to: Use of Industry Best Practices in Processing Parcels   4 years 10 months ago

    My view point is from maintenance and on several ocassions while working on a piece of equipment, viewing the inefficiencey of parcel machine clerks, reading magazines or just sitting idle in between keying parcels onto high speed induction units. Many will key 10 packages and then sit idle for up to 2 minutes while their supervisors do absolutely nothing to end this wasteful practice. I would recommend issuing a copy of the one minute manager to every supervisor in mail processing, then hold them accountable when their personnel are caught holding up production in this manner. Of course what do I know, I only was a Production Superintendant in the military for the last 8 years of my 20 years service.

  • Reply to: Use of Industry Best Practices in Processing Parcels   4 years 10 months ago

    WE HAVE TO MANY PEOPLE IN MANAGEMENT NEED MORE LESS EXPENSIVE WORKERS

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