• Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    Depends on what the incentive is to the business' involved. I don't think "just be good guys and sell to us for less" is much of a strategy. Perhaps long term contracts with the business' involved or buying other products also from the business' involved. Why doesn't the postal service go to their customers and say we know how hard it is we're reducing the cost of a stamp from .44 to .40 cents. This is what the postal service is asking the business' they buy from to do. Rollin' On

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    SEEMS LIKE THIS IS WHAT SHOULD HAVE BEEN DONE,
    ALL THE TIME. MAYBE, GM & CHRYSLER WERE MORE
    FORWARD THINKING THAN THE SERVICE HAS BEEN. IT
    SEEMS A BIT LATE TO BE LOCKING THE BARN DOOR.

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    Just because we now have sliced bread, packaged balogna,packaged cheese, and bottled condiments doesn't mean we should eleminate the kitchen. It does make it faster to have things in order in the kitchen. Let the cook put it together and service is swift. Make the cook take it to the table and look at each individual preference, it takes more time and is sloppy, as the delivery person tries to go faster, soon you will have egg all over the place. Try serving a banquet of 500 people, making each order at the table, the people at the end will never come back.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    Why should companies renegotiate with the Postal Service, when the Postal Service would not renegotiate when they were failing or the price of salt doubles and the contract snow removers asked the Post Office to renegotiate. What comes around goes around. I don't feel sorry for when you are homeless but I beg you to help me. Hypocrites

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    The postal service will not, and should not survive, unless it rids itself of the petty bureaucrats that have a strangle hold at every level. The postal service has the means to operate efficiently but those that actually do the work are stifled. In my office no one is in possession a credit card; therefore we cannot procure supplies and/or services locally. Every day we are forced to contract out work that we could do in house because we have no way to pay for parts or supplies. The district finance manger will not authorize a cash payment or a no-fee money order. Perhaps one day they will figure out that not everything is available through ebuy and that in small town American not all can or will wait for a PS8230 to be processed. Local management doesn’t care as long as it doesn’t come out of their supply and services budget.
    Don’t kid yourself, it all about ego and power; survivability of the postal service does not enter into the equation.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    I have never seen a place such as the postal service! They will spend millions to save thousands! The motto should be, "We're going to save money no matter how much it costs us!" I am down to 7 1/2 months until I retire & I will be running for the door. This place is a bureaucratic nightmare on a collision course with its destiny, total failure. Good riddance!

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    When we first got DPS at our office our Postmaster let us case it in or do whatever we needed to do to make it work, our office was no. 1 in the District and the only office showing an improvement with DPS. Well when our Postmaster went to a meeting to be congratulated on why our office was no. 1 and why DPS was working out so well he explained he let us case it up or do whatever to make it work, needless to say his superiors were upset and told him we were not allowed to touch the DPS and we went from the top to the bottom, one of the worst, thanks for the overtime.

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    I have been a Letter Carrier for 20 years and witnessed the DPS transition. Guess it has been 12, 13 years since it showed up in our office. The most money I ever made was during the first 3 years of having DPS in our office. Even though there are still a few bugs in the system, back then it was unbelievable. I remember working 55-60 hour weeks back then.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    I think that it would send the wrong message, a contract should be honored. The Postal Service has built a reputation of trust, this could undermine that, we are often judged on our actions during times of adversity versus times of plenty and to renege on this before the contracts expire is unfair and not good business practices. Although, I do believe that once contracts have expired the next round should be focused on a more cost effective model whereas it would better serve the needs of the Postal Service, but for now the Postal Service should continue to streamline, consolidate and extend Vera opportunities.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    No, when you have management spending $73 million for "relocation" services and they are the ones that write the rules that support it, renegotiating contracts wont make a dent!!! Its time to hold management to the fire for their fraud and mismanagement!!!!

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    Sucking 15 billion out of the economy will hurt suppliers even more, deeping the recession. We are in a no win situation. My kids will seldom use the USPS as they get older. UPS and FEDX will take Market share as our fiscal troubles will have customers scrambling for the exist. Placing our plight in the Media is speeding up the downward spiral we are now facing. Sad the company I love is going way of the telegraph.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    We should start chargig a handling fee for Priority boxes sent by Mail to customers. People just do not appreciate something they don't pay for, even if an insignificant amount. Also should be some way to limit what can be requested based on how much they Mail, etc. Continue to see to many eBayers requesting free Priority boxes, then covering them and Mailing Media Mail. The recent fiasco where the students ordered boxes and filled their school hallways with them show the folly of sending any amount of packing products to anyone, no questions asked.

  • Reply to: Business Reply Mail   4 years 10 months ago

    How do I contact my postmaster? The business model is much like netflix but a niche market of educational DVDs.

    Here are some of the problems we are having with our mailings. This is starting to get very frustrating as our entire business model is centered around our mail being delivered in a safe and timely fashion.

    1. BRM mail is being returned up to a week and a half late. Sometimes items postmarked a week apart are arriving together. We are aware that our post office has only one person trained in handling mail. Is it sitting on a desk waiting for enough volume to be processed? Does it get processed if this person is busy or out for the week/day?

    2. We are still encountering untrained and rude workers at the post office. My wife went to place money on the BRM account for the second time Monday, June 15th 2009 where the clerk did not know what to do and had an attitude. This is the SECOND TIME someone could not help my wife.

    3. Our BRM mailings are under 1 ounce. We are being charged 2 ounces.

    4. Our DVD's are coming damaged in the mail. It takes quite a bit of pressure to break one of these DVDs. So far we have had two broken. Is this a matter of spite?

    5. I spoke to the Supervisor personally about these issues and was directed to speak to someone else since he didn't know anything about BRM.

    6. There are public reviews of this same post office online at: http://www.yelp.com/biz/us-post-office---brooklyn-brooklyn . Every person who reviews this 11211 williamsburg post office asks, "WHEN ARE THEY GOING TO SHUT THIS PLACE DOWN?" people have been posting lengthy complaints about this post office since 2006. This is a booming area; is it too much to ask for reliable mail?

    We have spent an enormous amount of money trying to start this business between stocking inventory, printing envelopes, programming and much more. We were under the impression via Post Office advertising and services that BRM was a professional service that could be provided to us and relied upon; afterall netflix uses it. I really don't know what to do. Will things be better if we change post offices? If so, we have to print new envelopes; this is expensive. Should I consult a laywer concerning the reimbursment of our printing costs?

    I really don't know what to do. This is a pressing issue. Within one week we had 80 paying customers. Clearly this is a business that will work, but will it fail because of the post office?

  • Reply to: Business Reply Mail   4 years 10 months ago

    Thanks Randy for your comment. I agree that BRM customers should receive their return mail promptly. I would discuss your concerns with the postmaster.

  • Reply to: Business Reply Mail   4 years 10 months ago

    I had just recently started a business that is dependent upon timely BRM. I have been running it now for the past month and have been very disappointed with what has been going on at my post office.

    There seems to be one person trained for BRM. Often times it can take up to a WEEK AND A HALF between when BRM peices are postmarked and when it arrives. Sometimes BRM peices postmarked a week apart arrive together. I don't know if I should change post offices or what. My guess is that they are sitting on someones desk waiting to be processed and they take their time.

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    These machines cost about $876,000,000 each.They need to expand buildings or build new ones so they fit.At the bulk mail center in Jersey city,NJ. they had to move the military mail to the L&dc In karney.They hired clerks and other personal to work the mail. ( they had excess clerks in other places they could have used.)(Now the USPS is trying to cut.)Three or four years later they still don't have a FSS working there.From what i have read they don't work too well.If it wasn't for the waste,mismanagement and stealing the Post Office would not be in the mess it's in now.

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    I love this quote from the article:
    "You only had to pick up the mail and maybe a few parcels before you headed out on your route"

    HAHA!! A few parcels?? What about November and December. Will there be "just a few parcels" to work? Hell, Im still averaging 50-60 parcels a day. Seems more than a few!

    Its obvious, this author has no clue what actually happens on a daily basis for a carrier.

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    They still have money to burn, we all got teashirts today with an add on it for the po, of course no one will see it, or I should say not many will!

  • Reply to: Local Political Campaigns — The Forgotten Mail Volume Generator   4 years 10 months ago

    The Post office must be privatised.

    Sell it to the highest bidder.
    Hopefully UPS or FedEx will show some interest...

    Volume down 10% per year lately, and another 7 Billion dollar loss projected this year.
    That's basically, eating/destroying 27 million dollars per day!

    'outdated model' is an understatement.

    Continued support of this pig is like paying to keep the candlemakers 'in business',
    after the lightbulb was invented.
    Completely disastrous. :)

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    If this is true about DPS, why now in Northern NJ, currently in our office now, carriers are being sent out after returning from their own routes at 4 - 5 PM, to deliver 1st class mail from their DPS that was intended for a different route. Meaning letters missorts in town by the DPS.
    Why instead of all this waste of gas, travel time at peak traffic flow hours and carrier time, not allow the carriers to take 15 minutes in the AM, case the DPS and pull all the NOV, forwards, and letters for other routes, give them to the proper route and end the mistakes right there in the morn. It would eliminate the 3M case at night, and the time spent in the morn casing the DPS would be offset by the loss of sorting time in the PM for the 3M.

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    My residential DPS is fine. My business DPS is a nightmare. Most of my 78 business addresses have suite letters or numbers. So all number 20 letters are together but suites A, B, C, are all mixed. Taking it to the street this way would be a nightmare, so I sort it all.(BEFORE HITTING THE STREET) You can't sort this mail in the truck. If the Flats come this way Oh baby. I also agree with the person saying, Why buy all these FSS machines when you have 20 flats? Is that cost effective? duh!

  • Reply to: Use of Industry Best Practices in Processing Parcels   4 years 10 months ago

    I would like to see that while parcels are being moved around on the way to delivery, that someone, somewhere, is checking to be sure postage is correct on these items. I see postage due items everyday, and its a fight in my office to get the clerks to mark them up, and management wont pay the carrier to weigh and rate, so who is responsible? I agree with the poster above too, about scanning at pick-up, and people want to be able to track their package as it moves through the system.

    Oh! And we should get a definition on who the "customer" actually is. Is it the person that we are delivering to? John Q Public? Or is it the mass mailers and printing houses? Seems there is a real discrepancy when it comes to the use of the term "Customer"

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    What about the Rural Carriers that are using their own vehicles to deliver in? Imagine trying to work 4 bundles, plus advos and parcels from the front seat of your Subaru or Blazer? Stopping at each mail box will be a two minute ordeal, not to mention if you have to leave the vehicle for a door delivery! Its unsafe, physical suicide, and mental insanity!

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    FSS will be the death of the carrier. Spending nearly 8 hours walking the streets in sub-zero or 100+ temperatures will not be sustainable for a 25yrs+ career. Not to mention the additonal hours of being forced to work OT because USPS can't manage to properly staff their offices. With 10+hours on the street, the body will start to fall apart. Injuries will increase 8-fold as well as increases in diseases such as arthritis. Those who do manage to retire as a career letter carrier will be too crippled to enjoy their remaining years.

    Also, automated mail provides a lower quality of service. Vacants, movers, & holds are often left in sequence and delivered by unknowing subs. PARS is doing a great job, but expired forwards as well as UBBM are often delivered by unknowing replacements. It makes the USPS look bad and incompetent. As a poster stated above, management is too focused on quantity and not quality, all for the sake of making the numbers to get that bigger PFP. We are suppose to be a "service" to the public, and instead the USPS has become nothing but a managerial game of numbers.

    FSS and DPS machines are obsolete when used in conjunction. It creates 4th bundle issues that result in costly manual sortation by carriers. If the USPS is to continue down the automation road, it must invest in equipment that handles flats and letters simultaneously - creating one bundle. So, stop throwing away billions on FSS equipment and buildings to house them. Mail volume will never return to its' previous peak. The world is "going green" and the younger technology-friendly generation may never purchase a stamp. Wait for a more feasible one-bundle system to be developed. Don't purchase machines that only do half the job and are not providing significant return on our investment. Stop the waste of billions of dollars. We are in no postiion to be squandering this money and with the current low volumes, we will not be able recuperate our costs for a long, long time.

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    No, I never filed Workman's Comp because I got a great office job for the last 12 years and it would have been almost impossible to link the carrier wear and tear after 12 years.

Pages