• Reply to: How is the Postal Service Managing Its Forklift Fleet?   5 years 6 months ago

    This system is a total failure. We have waste4d more time and money on this system with no usefull return on the investment.

  • Reply to: How is the Postal Service Managing Its Forklift Fleet?   5 years 6 months ago

    In Buffalo,all these rfid systems are sitting idle on forklifts and jitneys.All are turned off with shattered screens and broken antenna's.They were used exclusively for safety checklist (OSHA).Never were they used for two way communication or locating a piece of equipment.Total waste of time and money.

  • Reply to: How is the Postal Service Managing Its Forklift Fleet?   5 years 6 months ago

    another waste of good money did not work and has since not been used and has never worked when youre spending someone else mney you dont care.......

  • Reply to: How is the Postal Service Managing Its Forklift Fleet?   5 years 6 months ago

    I was a fork-lift operator (MEO) for many years before retiring recently. The PIVMS was a $35 mllion waste of money. The system was never used for the purpose it was designed for. Actually because of the many problems with the system it slowed down production. A total failure.

  • Reply to: Postal Service Network Streamlining   5 years 6 months ago

    GET RID OF MOST LETTERS. HAVE LETTERS SENT BY TELEPHONE FAX. IT IS MORE SECURE THAN E MAILS.
    MOST PEOPLE HAVE PHONES. LICENSE THE SERVICE TO THE TELEPHONE COMPANIES FOR A FEE. HAVE THE TELEPHONE COMPANY COLLECT THE SENDING FEE FROM THE CUSTOMER.

  • Reply to: How Can the Postal Service Reduce the Costs Associated with Postage Stamps?   5 years 6 months ago

    As a stamp collector since the mid-1960s, I think the USPS has been doing a horrible job of creating many, many useless stamps for the last couple of decades and more. Case in point, Flag stamps and Forever stamps. They're ugly, they come in a ridiculous variety by at least three printers and in various formats (sheet, coil, booklet). To top it off, postal clerks are told to push these hideous, boring stamps on the public when the USPS has a wide variety of attractive commemorative stamps that are likely the bulk of the stamps that are being sent back for destruction.

    My suggestion is to print one variety of Flag stamp in coil, sheet and booklet format perhaps using different printers to only print one format per printer. Make all other stamps Forever stamps and get rid of that ugly Liberty Bell, or at least change the design every rate change. Tell your clerks to push commemorative stamps.

    I don't know how many times I've gone into post offices to mail something with a high rate and the clerk, despite my telling them to use stamps, whips out a meter. I've had words that required the PM to come out so that they disposed of the meter and use a Priority or Express Mail stamp. Use stamps, don't send them back for destruction.

    Look back in postal history before the implementation of lettered non-denominational stamps (ie A, B, C, etc. series) and see how many fewer varieties of common definitive stamps were produced. There used to be one definitive set of stamps with variable rates which would cover the whole spectrum and then there were commemorative stamps in addition to these. There weren't 15 varieties of Flag stamps and 9 varieties of Forever stamps. That's where you can save money.

    In reading Linn's Stamp News, there is at least one letter to the editor per week about people trying to buy stamps that are not being stocked at local post offices. By reducing the number of ugly definitives, perhaps PMs can actually order stamps that people like. Look at the Providence, Rhode Island philatelic sales unit as a model for how money can be made by making philatelic sales. Personally, I spend hundreds of dollars each year on stamps that are never going to see use other than mounted in albums. Cater more to stamp collectors. This is pure profit.

  • Reply to: How Can the Postal Service Reduce the Costs Associated with Postage Stamps?   5 years 6 months ago

    We should continue to have stamps. They provide a history lesson and are an indication what a society values. However, from a stamp collectors' point of view, there are currently too many stamps that are being issued. If the quantity of stamps (and postal cards) being issued were cut in half (at least) on a yearly basis, and the public could purchase stamps before they were destroyed, then the inventory problem would resolve itself and stamps would not have to be destroyed. A side result of this implementation might be more stamp collectors as the hobby would be more affordable.

  • Reply to: How Can the Postal Service Reduce the Costs Associated with Postage Stamps?   5 years 6 months ago

    Please decide whether the Postasl System is a business or a service.

    If you are a service you do not need to show a profit. I do not expect the Defense Deptartment, which supplies a serice, to show a profit.

    If you are a business, you need to re-examine your plan. You have too many chiefs (supervisors and administrators) and too few Indians (people with a positive atttitude who deal directly with the public). You should not be destroying assets (old stamps). You should be developing and encouraging people to collect stamps. You should be reaching out to schools and educators to use stamps as a teaching tool.

    You are in a downward spiral, as a busiess, in that as you raise costs you start eroding your customer base, so you raise the cost of postage, and further erode the base, so you raise the cost of postage...

  • Reply to: How Can the Postal Service Reduce the Costs Associated with Postage Stamps?   5 years 6 months ago

    Yes, we need postage stamps. They tell us something about ourselves and what we value.

    Yes, we need more than 2 denominations as there are more than 2 rates in effect - i.e. First Class, 23nd ounce, post card, airmail, etc.

    No we do not need more "Forever Stamps." Forever means exactly what it says. If you have a foreever stamp why do you need to take on the cost of creating and printing another stamp since the first one is supposed to last forever?

    The USPS needs to encourage collecting by printing fewer stamps of higher quality. I would like a stamp to look like a stamp and not like a label children buy at a variety store.

    I simply do not undertsand destruction of assets. Do not print any more .44 stamps until you use up what you have. Perhaps you ought to be looking at the work by those people who generate the ideas as to how many stamps to print of each issue? If you have that many stamps left over, then someone is giving you bad information as to how many stamps to print in the first place.

    Take the stamps that are being stored and use them. Sell them in glassine envelopes so that a combination of them adds up to the current first class rate. Sell large amounts of old stock either at face or at a discount. I routinely use combinations of stamps to add up the current rate.

    Think out side the box as the current policies or not succeeding. You have enough postage on hand - use it before you print more.

  • Reply to: Postal Service Network Streamlining   5 years 6 months ago

    Streamlining? What is happening in Philadelphia. Close one facility, move mail to another, and fail. The movement of mail and people from the Philadelphia L&DC to the Philadelphia NDC was poorly planned. Now, people are being accused of poor implementation! It was a poor plan, plain and simple. Where are the "planners" that are responsible for this mess. Even the best managers can't implement a plan that was faulty from the start.

  • Reply to: How Can the Postal Service Reduce the Costs Associated with Postage Stamps?   5 years 6 months ago

    If you print so many stamps each year that never see use then you are doing it so colletors can buy them and you never have to deliver a service for the price paid. Reduce you stamps each year to just a few. Make them attractive (I suggest firing the committee who selects the images as they are nuts!). Go back to the limited number you did in the 20's and 30's.
    Why do you ship and reship stamps and destroy them. Keep them on sale until they are sold out....Sheesh.
    Why do you make so many different perferations when one will do nicely.
    Why use so many printers? Let the ones you don't use get their business from other nations.
    Give up on the glue that won't let collectors soak stamps off covers. You will never convince me that a water soluble glue is more expensive.
    I realize the computer age offers some attractive alternatives to stamps; much to the chagrin of collectors. However, there is no need to eliminate them. Just be a lot more business-minded about how you produce and administer them.

    Cheers

    PS - Do a series of stamps picturing the people who issued those hard-t-get provisionals.

  • Reply to: How Can the Postal Service Reduce the Costs Associated with Postage Stamps?   5 years 6 months ago

    Limit the number of commemorative stamps and regular stamps issued each year. But do not eliminate stamps.

  • Reply to: How Can the Postal Service Reduce the Costs Associated with Postage Stamps?   5 years 6 months ago

    How save costs with postal service? Multiple methods could be pursued to reduce costs.
    1. Produce fewer stamps per year. Who needs the 100+ stamps issued. Many are never used and are not available to the general public through the local post offices.
    2. Change formats and print commemoratives in the form of booklet stamps. Folks like the convience of booklets - give it to them. Could result in more commemoratives being used on postage and aid the hobby of stamp collecting.
    3. Get away from a forever stamp. Stamps bought today being good forever sounds good but what if all the 3 cent stamps were printed as "forever" stamps. You would already be bankrupt!
    4. Reduce the number of printing varieties used for the current forever stamp. Why do you need five printers, different booklet sizes, multiple coil lengths, etc.
    5. Stop giving "flat rate" boxes away. How many of these are shipped to individuals for personal use and never see the post office. Put a charge on these boxes and reduce the postage rate. Bottom line would be the same.
    6. Consider rendering all stamps issued before a set year, say 2000, invalid for postage.

    Sit back and look at your business, and it is a business. Ask yourself, "Why do I do this, issue so many items in different forms, etc.? Eliminate the wasted costs that do not really add anything to profit for the organization.

  • Reply to: Guest Blog: A Last Mile Strategy   5 years 6 months ago

    A number of years ago, Time Inc. experimented with DDU entry for our weekly magazines. The experiment involved 45 zip codes in Southern California. We learned a great deal. First, it's all about volume. You need significant volume to justify the truck expense for each DDU. Second, details are important. Not all DDUs can handle 53 foot trailers, so it's important to have an accurate database for each postal facility and schedule the trucks accordingly. There are other issues involving hours of operation for each DDU, available dock space, traffic, etc. This is not an easy business.

    Valassis (formerly ADVO) has made DDU entry work for their business because of their high density. To make such a system work for other mailers, it would involve the development of local consolidation centers. Given the fact that the USPS already has such centers in place (SCFs), I suggest that the industry pursue a "last 10 mile strategy" (SCF entry) versus a last mile strategy (DDU entry). It will save everyone a lot of heartburn.

  • Reply to: How Can the Postal Service Reduce the Costs Associated with Postage Stamps?   5 years 6 months ago

    it would probably be useful if USPS issued less stamps and made more of them related to the predominant rates (say first class letter, first class flat, first class parcel, each with 1, 2, and 3 ounce stamps), reducing the number of 44c commemoratives. I'll never understand the theory behind limited distribution stamps; if you want to have people use stamps, shouldn't you make them available. As to Forever stamps, they will reduce destruction if all first class stamps are forever, regardless of design [like th British 1st non-denominated]; in fact, that approach can be used on all stamps: 1st, 1st 2 ounce, Canada, Mexico, etc.; or as many different rates as USPS wants [does seem that the number and complexity of rates is increasing exponentially]. But USPS claims it loses money from the Forever stamps because people essentially are paying discounted rates [hey, this wasn't my idea but theirs]. There is a significant collector [and hoarder] segment that pays for stamps but never claims the service associated with them; they'll never do this with PVIs or meters, so capitalize on them.

    David

  • Reply to: How Can the Postal Service Reduce the Costs Associated with Postage Stamps?   5 years 6 months ago

    It seems obvious that we need more than two denominations. MOST stamps could be Forever stamps, issued in several denominations to be used for domestic postcards, domestic letters under one ounce, domestic letters up to two ounces, priority mail, and express mail. I think airmail stamps should continue to be issued in the current series and format, to showcase the beauty of our great country, but they might be made into Forever Airmail stamps, too.

    A few denominated stamps will always be necessary for overweight letters, registration and insurance, etc., but they need not be changed every year. A basic definitive set of 1-, 2-, 3-, 5-, and 10-cent stamps plus perhaps 1-, 2-, and 5-dollar stamps would suffice. They should again showcase American heroes or landmarks. There would be no need to destroy them ever.

    Commemorative stamps should be issued as Forever stamps, in formats that fit people's wallets. There will always be a need for stamps, because some people do not have access to computers or even post offices, so being able to purchase booklets of attractive stamps at a substation or grocery store is important.

  • Reply to: How Can the Postal Service Reduce the Costs Associated with Postage Stamps?   5 years 6 months ago

    Oh Boy ! Ben Franklin is rolling over in his grave.
    Stamps and the ease of the mail were and still are esential for the safety and security of a free nation.
    The idea of an inexpensive means of delivering the mail is necessary , and must include stamp production and choices.
    I don't have the answers because I don't have enough information why the costs have increased so much over the last 40 years. Perhaps full disclosure will alow the public to know where the waist is. I just don't think its in the stamps cost alone. I venture to say
    the problem goes a lot deeper., and may mean looking at labor costs and benefits and technical efficiency of operations. Can we look back at how it was done over the past 170 years. What support has the govenment played in the past, and what is necessary now. Once we stop printing stamps I think we are all licked !

    JB

  • Reply to: Guest Blog: A Last Mile Strategy   5 years 6 months ago

    Daily in my station each carrier gets at least 300-400 pieces of bulk rate "presorted" mail, that will not conform to DPS standards because of size or thickness. They are tossed in tubs by the plant and are at our cases in the morning (no longer in sequence) for us to case individualy. Where is the savings to the USPS?

  • Reply to: Guest Blog: A Last Mile Strategy   5 years 6 months ago

    The writer really should do his homework first before spouting off how much the mailers are doing the Postal Service and the American People a favor.
    According to Postal Service own figures as reported in:
    A New Business Model for the United States Postal Service
    November 20, 2009
    We can barcode mail for $6 a thousand why are we giving workshare discounts at 10 cents a piece which is $100 a thousand? According to the same report we can manually sort the same mail for $86 a thousand. It would be cheaper for the Postal Service to sort the mail by hand!
    If the Postal Service equipment can sort between 35 to 40 thousand pieces per hour that looks like a loss of $3200 dollars for every hours worth of mail that is processed through workshare discounts!

  • Reply to: Postal Service Network Streamlining   5 years 6 months ago

    If the U.S. Postal service would offer an 80% on letter carriers under civil service to retire with no peneltys, the post office could save about $79.000 per employee per year.
    The post office could keep the 6 day delivery, keep all emlpoyees that have been hired, and the 80% would be made up through the years with NO cash pay out. What I am saying is the 80% is the same as working 40 years. Most civil employees already have 30 to 42 years already. Get with the program PMG.

  • Reply to: Guest Blog: A Last Mile Strategy   5 years 6 months ago

    my town once had 32 collection boxes.then we now have 12. The ones that were removed ,were done so on orders from above. ONe common reason given to us is they were not generating enough letters. but of the 12, 5 sat in the alley behind the post office. this leaves 7 for the rest of town.now for the general public, where might you find a blue box in a strange town? other than at the front or rear of the post office(for obvious reasons), the next logical place to look is at the local court house if there is one.other than that, you probably would have to ask someone. ONE THING THAT HAS NEVER MADE SENSE TO ME IS THAT WE ARE TO PICK UP MAIL ATTHE IND HOUSES WHEN WE DELIVER THE MAIL DAILY, AND YET THIS TAKES TIME, BUT WE DON'T HAVE MORE BLUE BOXES BECAUSE THEY DON'T GENERATE ENOUGH VOLUME. IF THEY ARE GIVING ME THE TIME TO PICK UP LET'S SAY 400 INDIVIDUAL PIECES OF MAIL AT RESIDENCES, WHAT'S WRONG WITH ONE EXTRA MINUTE AT A BLUE BOX LOCATED ON MY ROUTE SOMEWHERE, THAT'S THERE FOR THE CONVENIENCE OF THE PUBLIC. BOTTOM LINE, YOU CAN'T SOAR WITH THE EAGLES WHEN YOU WORK WITH TURKEYS.

  • Reply to: How Can the Postal Service Reduce the Costs Associated with Postage Stamps?   5 years 6 months ago

    the forever stamp represents the reg 1oz postage stamp. make a stamp that is the standard post card stamp. just change how much it cost to buy it. same with the express mail stamp. you want a post card stamp 10 years from now, it will look like the same as todays- it will just cost you more unless you stocked up on them.how many times will postage change in 10 years? the bottom line is the basic stamps don't need to. YOU ONLY NEED A STANDARD FEW TO GET BY ON.I have seen clerks at the window waste 10 minutes on a customer who only wanted a book of stamps but the clerk had to show them everything available in the office available for purchase. they could have had a book of forevers and been gone in under a minute.

  • Reply to: Guest Blog: A Last Mile Strategy   5 years 6 months ago

    "but great news that the bloated bureaucratic management in both organizations, will have to all go out and find real jobs where they have to work for a living."
    I hope your words ring true. I've never seen an organization with so many managers bumping into each other while trying to find something to do.

  • Reply to: How Can the Postal Service Reduce the Costs Associated with Postage Stamps?   5 years 6 months ago

    1. Your question is incorrect. There are at least more than 2 postal rates: 1st class, post cards, 2nd oz; priority, express et al.
    2. Forever stamps are a partial solution to 1 above. I think it would certainly simplify U.S. Mail consumers. As a general issue I urge you to simplify the pricing structure. Postal regulations are becoming as complicated as your those of the IRS!
    3. I admit to bias toward this question. I have been a stamp collector for over 50 years. Yes, stamps should continue. I'd prefer to see thorough review of the commemorative issuing process. It is to complicated. Also if there are to many inventories, I suggest eliminating one or two levels of controls. While "trust but verify" is necessary, there should be an easier way to control the movement of stamps in your pipeline.

    Thanks for asking.

  • Reply to: Guest Blog: A Last Mile Strategy   5 years 6 months ago

    The Postal Service is in the buggy whip business. Like any paradigm, the owner of the paradigm doesn't see it until it's too late.

    The USPS, and the OIG that oversees it, all need to be privatized. It's all a bad joke. To mail I letter I have to drive miles to find a 'blue box'. Which genius had the brilliant idea of scrapping those?

    It's too bad that the hard working Postal carriers will have to be affected, but great news that the bloated bureaucratic management in both organizations, will have to all go out and find real jobs where they have to work for a living.

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