The Postal Service does not receive tax dollars to sustain its operations, but relies on accurate postage payments for support. While the vast majority of the Postal Service’s customers pay the full cost of mailing, revenue loss, otherwise known as revenue leakage, can occur when individual or business customers don’t pay the appropriate postage for their mailings.
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Postage may be paid in a number of ways. Customers can buy stamps at a customer service window and apply them to letters and packages as they need them, which can sometimes lead to underpayment of postage. Business customers can pay through meter or permit accounts. Business Mail Entry Units make sure that the correct postage has been affixed or claimed when discounts are claimed. Online sellers can use PC Postage and Click-N-Ship® postage with free carrier pick-up, eliminating the hassle of taking their goods to the Post Office to be weighed and shipped. Of course, this could lead to mistakes in mailings sent out under the wrong, and cheaper, mailing class for which the goods do not apply, such as mailing a set of skis as media mail.

Because of its dire financial situation, it’s now more important than ever for the Postal Service to protect the revenue it is due whether it comes in from the post office window, meters, online postage accounts, or from permit accounts.

Now is the time to share your thoughts and help the agency get back in the black.

What are the best ways to protect Postal Service revenue? Enter your comments below.

The Office of Audit Sales and Service team is hosting this topic.

Comments (56)

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  • anon

    Under the Seamless Acceptance plan, the strategic plan to automate the verification of commercial mailings, the potential for revenue loss is huge. What, if anything, is being done to stem the hemorrhaging? Revenue protection has taken a back seat to the elimination of BMEU jobs, OIG need to take a closer look at the unethical business decisions being made by postal management.

    Sep 02, 2014
  • anon

    Most Postal employees do not realize the negative impact that short paid mail has on the Postal Service. From the data collected last year it was estimated that the USPS lost 600 million in revenue due to short paid mail. The District I am in was held accountable for roughly 6 million of the 600 million. You would think with the declining revenue and mail volumes each District Manager would put some effort in collecting a portion of the lost revenue. I first started detecting postage due mail as a clerk. Each morning I would challenge another clerk to see who could come up with the most postage due mail and the lesser would pay for the coffee during the am break. It would be easy just to put everything you thought was postage due on a pile but we added if you guessed wrong on the weight you would lose two pieces so this made the game a little interesting. Later in my career I began to take it a bit more seriously and realized this was no longer a game. Since the shape based requirement many meter customers did not change the way the postage was applied partially because no one told them. From what I have learned is most of the short paid first class is collected by carriers, brought in to the back door for dispatch where the dispatch clerk has little or no retail knowledge or picked up on a dedicated collection route by either a PVS driver or carrier. The P&DC is a funnel and is a great place to start however most mail handlers and clerks in the plant have no rate knowledge. The P&DC will not utilize work hours to detect postage due mail and customer service clerks cannot work in the plant environment. I propose to create a EAS revenue protection specialist position. This individual would identify and document the postage due mail and then contact the Postmaster of the origin zip code. The Postmaster then would contact the mailer to educate the mailer. There are four areas for identification of postage due mail first the 010 or opening unit. This is where the incoming comingled mail is separated then sent to specific areas in the plant. Second would be the rough cull area. This is where fat letters, flats and small parcels are culled before going to the Advance Facer Canceller. The third place would be at near the loading station on the flat sorter. The fourth would be the dumping station for the SPBS and APPS. Marketing is dong a great job at getting additional customers but the customers we currently have should be paying the correct rate. Having a carrier take a postage due letter for 17 or 44 cents to a customer actually costs the USPS more in man hours than what is collected. The key is contacting the mailers and educating them, this is also a great way to then promote other services that we as a company have to offer. Many times you see a large brown envelope get mailed from a company with Priority postage applied and no Priority endorsement. The Company probably did not realize it was Priority or did not have the needed packaging priority supplies on hand. Studies show companies that have the packing on hand use them.

    Feb 24, 2011
  • anon

    We are still listening to all of you out there (even if we are unable to post you comments due to the sensitive nature), so please keep the dialogue happening!

    Jan 21, 2011
  • anon

    I agree with most of these posts {except for COMMONCENTS} I believe that the craft employees have great ideas for cost cutting since they are in touch with the customers as well as the mail. I also agree with MOPAR. You should be investigating wasteful spending as well as revenue protection. How about Potter? He should be held accountable for what he's done to our service, and to hard working, honest employees. Grievances and lawsuits are costing the PO millions and no one tries to correct these situations. MOPAR, the waste, fraud, and abuse is going on all over our country. The public needs to know about this.

    Jan 03, 2011
  • anon

    I was fascinated by your response to Lenny with respect to his observations about EXFC and the way it managed. I contacted the PRC with concerns about the manner in which EXFC was distorting behavior and was referred to the OIG. I had several exchanges with someone at OIG, he had me look at an audit done in the Dallas area with respect to a shadow Priority delivery network - nothing unique there. Ultimately though the answer was always that management's approach to EXFC was within the confines of their discretion. I am reminded of the old saw I learned as a steward many year's ago - management has the right to mismanage. It is no secret that every district has adopted some form of shadow network to chase EXFC perfection. A measurement that was designed to report on the efficiency of the network as it operated normally has become more a measure of our ability to identify extraordinary means and procedures in the quest for higher numbers. It is truly a shame that no one has been able to address what amounts to a fundamental element of our institutional culture with respect to systems measurement. As far as revenue protection goes, it would seem that there are many opportunities for improvement. Start with an obtuse rate system that is virtually impenetrable to the layman. Add to that the infatuation with programs like Click and Ship that appear to have no real controls - ironic that we treat employees as if they are all dishonest and apparently give little thought to the idea that customers with economic incentive will not abuse the system. Finally, mix in an institutional culture that worships numerical goals without a basic understanding of the elements from which many of the goals are determined. The Postal Service is an essential institution that does amazingly well in spite of itself. Unfortunately as the challenges of sustaining an unsustainable business model become more evident the resulting cognitive dissonance becomes ever more deafening.

    Jan 03, 2011
  • anon

    How about management receiving bonuses for cutting certain costs...or bonuses in general. Seems that bonuses are contrary to the USPS goal of getting out of debt and serving the public at an "affordable" price. ...or How about VMF management "saving" $4000 through cuts in overtime by contracting out work and towing services at a total cost in 2010 of just over $1 milliion? Of course, that money comes from a diferent budget...so that makes it okay! ONE more...Why does the USPS send upper management to etiquette schools to learn how to mingle with high position politicians, rich businessmen, and foreign dignitaries. These people are put up in 4-star like hotels as well. Just like our government - overspend, blame the people who do the work, raise prices, and spend more on the white collars!!! PROVE ME WRONG OR LOOK INTO WASTE, FRAUD, AND ABUSE at the Omaha, NE VMF

    Dec 24, 2010
  • anon

    I forgot to mention that I agree too many stamps are getting through not cancelled. Why can't the delivery person take notice and cancel them? Surely the operations manual instructs the delivery person in this regard. My old postman used to strike a pen through but since he retired I don't find the new people as efficient.

    Dec 23, 2010
  • anon

    I enjoy different thoughts shared in here!!:-)

    Sep 16, 2011
  • anon

    Promote the use of stamps to pay your bills. We get plenty of solicitations to use the internet and email instead of using stamps. Use these reasons: 1. Reduces e-mail clutter. 2. Saves online time. 3. Don't have to worry about lost passwords and user ID's. 4. Reduces chances of online identity theft and fraud. 5. Post Office employs inspectors for illegal mail or theft but Microsoft does not come to the rescue.

    Dec 23, 2010
  • anon

    Wow, it's really help and useful RSS Feed!

    Aug 20, 2011
  • anon

    We want to thank everyone for taking the time to post their comments and votes. Again, if your comment was not made public due to the sensitive nature of the content, it is still being taken into consideration by the team. Again, thank you all for your many and varied comments!

    Dec 20, 2010
  • anon

    Unfortunately, the people running the USPS merely echo what their bosses think, and really never attended a business school. If they want to increase revenue via first class mail for example, then a re-education process must occur within the school systems across the nation. In order to receive state, and federal aids, schools should get required to teach children to write letters. Postmasters should visit schools, and give the postal sales pitch to children. Newly graduating senior should be given a free book of stamps to write thank you cards. Yes, I said free. So many graduates don't even know how to address an envelope let alone write a letter. This bodes poorly for First Class Mail going forward. The sales pitch given by the post masters should include the benefits, and services the USPS offers. Get these young adults into the fold. I hold little confidence in the senior leadership of the USPS to correct the decreasing volume of First Class Mail. And, quite frankly, unless they develop new concepts to generate growth in this area, it will continue to shrink. Furthermore, walking from one house to the next house to deliver mail is akin to fighting a 21st century battle with a 17th century technique. Elimination of this would greatly reduce worker compensation claims, and genuinely improve working conditions for employees. Wages, hours, and conditions of employment remain the 3 negotiable issues in any collective bargaining settlement. Require all customers nationwide to place their mail boxes on the street.

    May 30, 2011
  • anon

    One other thing, We shouldn't be providing collection service to UPS stores. They are our competition and they do not push our products to their customers. When their customers do decide to use USPS via a UPS store clerk, the UPS store charges a huge mark up over and above the postal rates. This should be made illegal or we should refuse to pick up from their stores if they're going to insist on continuing this practice. I pick up from these stores regularily on a collection run, and most days I don't pick up enough in postage to pay for the time that I spend pulling into and out of the parking lot. It a loss of money to bother wasting our time servicing UPS stores and other similar outfits.

    Dec 19, 2010
  • anon

    yes i agree instead of laying off work force postmaster should eleminate manament jobs. every postoffice does not need station MANAGER.All the supervisior repot to Area manager. And one more thing all light duty (who are in managment because of thier friends) should go or return to their bids.i know one supervisor who is in managment for the last 10 yrs(204B) never been gainfully employee, always on light duty, filing grevinces for overtime, never carried whole rout,never helped managment,never push or pull empty equipment but since he became 204B he just harrases carrier clerks. How can i work for him when i know he was the worsr employee.

    Jan 17, 2011
  • anon

    You didn't ask about sequenced coverages that get a discount for being in walk sequence but yet they come in out of sequence and require the carriers to case them. We have no way of recovering this discount from the mailers that endorse their coverages as ERWSS but in reality are not in order. Once we have them we have lost revenue because of the discount granted and also lose with added labor expenses. In fact, if you just required all coverages to not have an address, you could save even more. Just one per address, and no address info on the mailpieces would be the best way to go. EAsier to work as a separate bundle as well.

    Dec 19, 2010
  • anon

    There is a reason why the postal services has been pulled down with a financial crisis. People are turning towards more efficient and cost effective alternatives. People will not wait for anyone, to render and improve their services. They are brutal and therefore will move on, leaving your organization injured without any business. This is the similar case in the postal services, the leak outs have been major and it might be difficult for the postal services to regain its balance. But it should be able to learn from its mistakes and not ignore it.

    May 31, 2010
  • anon

    I have a strong feeling that the post office could save a lot of lost revenue by not promising extreme pay to it's employees; clerks, carriers, factory workers, etc. etc. With over 700,000 employees strong all getting paid an extremely generous dollar, and very generous benefits, it goes without say that the Post Office has done more than it's capacity in taking care of it's own. Not to mention that holiday pay for those it's applicable for get double time if I'm not mistaken. Perhaps it's time that the employees themselves give back. If all employees were to give up one dollar an hour, the post office would save 1.45 billion a year. Frankly, I don't believe that a dollar per hour loss should be so detrimental to anybody that they are going to be bouncing checks at home. If that is the case, perhaps some individuals need to be better budgeters at home. Regardless, that is not a problem any company needs to worry about. A company is designed to make money, not provide benefits. For holiday pay, what is wrong with time and a half as opposed to double time? I also feel the employees should pay more into their own insurance as well as starting an employee contributed only 401k. I feel unionized employees get too confident in the protection a union brings but frankly with all due respect, I was raised not to bite the hand that feeds me. No union signs a paycheck, the company does. I think the employees need to understand that and if they wish to keep their job, keep overtime (I.E. -Saturday Delivery), perhaps they should take that into consideration. A 401k is better for an employee anyway because the employees have more control over how their retirement is shaped. I get tired of hearing about how management does nothing in my Post Office. Management does a lot, and they take a lot of heat from employees who all things considered, act like children at times. It's irritating. This is a serious business, and serious people are needed.

    Dec 17, 2010
  • anon

    Did I misread this weeks topic or was it Revenue Protection? Ranting about employees was the topic several weeks back. In response to your post, I will try to help clarify some misinformation. The Postal Service currently employs approximately 670,264 individuals. That number includes non bargaining and bargaining, full time and part time, career and temporary. The figure includes the Postal Regulatory Commission, HQ, field offices, OIG and the Inspection Service. There are too many to list them all but as you can see, the positions that make up the Postal Service go far beyond just clerks, carriers and mailhanders. It is a fact that the bargaining employees are represented by various unions. Thus their wages, benefits and working conditions are negotiated by their respective unions with the US Postal Service and their contracts are legally binding just like any other contract between two or more parties. Contrary to whatever you may feel, the Postal Service negotiated the terms of the contracts with the various unions, meaning they sat down and agreed. For non bargaining employees, they have their associations with representatives that advocate the wishes of their members but without a contract. The US Postal Service is a company in the looses sense of the word. They can just as easily be considered an association, a troop or a corps. What the US Postal Service constitutionally is, is government. The employees are government employees, public employees just like the ones that work down at your local City Hall or in your public schools with the one exception being that the US Postal Service can generate revenue. When postal employees receive their paychecks, they receive a government check, not a company check. It looks just like the check one receives from the IRS when getting a refund. It is debatable though, whether government should make a profit or just be a service to it's people. Postal employees do have a retirement program similar to the private sector 401K but being that the Postal Service is government, it's only available to government employees. It called the Thrift Savings Plan and all government employees who entered government service after 1984 are eligible to participate. It's the same retirement program that your Senators, your Congressman, and your Armed Services members participate in. Lastly, I don't know what the management at your Post Office is complaining to you about but this is America, the land of the free and if they don't like their job with the Postal Service, they can quit.

    Dec 20, 2010
  • anon

    Wow, thanks for the repulican talking points!!

    Dec 19, 2010
  • anon

    5-10-10 To Whom This May Concern, For the past twenty five years I have been employed by the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) as a letter carrier but since today is my day off and I’m “off the clock” I am, at this time, a postal customer. Here are a few suggestions that, I know, will contribute to the USPS getting out of the “red”: * Instead of laying off workforce employees, lay off managers and supervisors. I believe it was last year or the year before that United Parcel Service (UPS) layed off 1,800 supervisors and managers and showed a profit the following year. We do NOT need 3 to 4 managers/supervisors per postal installation as we do in some post offices. (Pebble Hills P.O., El Paso, Texas, for example, has 1 station manager and sometimes 3 supervisors. There have been times when there was only 1 member of management present and business was well taken care of ). *STOP paying out bonuses to ANY and ALL members of management. *Millions of dollars can and will be saved if grievances won by postal employees and monetary awards are made to said employees are paid to the employee(s) winning the grievance not by the USPS but by the supervisor(s) who violated the contract thus forcing a grievance. Think about it, if you violate the contract and , for example, a letter carrier is awarded $400.00, that $400.00 comes out of YOUR paycheck and NOT from the USPS. I’m sure that our contract will be followed to the letter and the USPS will save hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of dollars. *Get rid of the Central Forwarding System (CFS). If Party “A” mails something to Party “B” and the item is returned to Party “A” for whatever reason (No such number; insufficient address; etc,), then let Party “A” find where Party “B” has gone (or what their complete address is, etc) and then let Party “A” pay new postage to resend their item to Party ”B”. DON’T forward and/or return mail at no additional fee! *In the past when the price of a First Class letter was raised, the price of a post card was dropped. What kind of baloney is that? How about EVERYONE pay the same postage rate? I don’t care if it’s a “Non-Profit” organization, a church group, a disabled group, utility company - EVERYONE pay the SAME rate. Here are some examples of letters I personally have delivered and the RIDICULOUS amount of postage paid and keep in mind that when delivering these pieces of mail they were NOT delivered to every house on my route (that is, 100% coverage): George W. Bush Presidential Center P.O. Box 560887 Dallas, TX 75356 .05 postage Republican National Committee 310 First Street, S.E. Washington, DC 20003 .10 postage Newt Gingrich Former Speaker Renewing American Leadership P.O. Box 1224 Merrifield, VA 22116-1224 .05 postage John Boehner Republican Leader “State of the Union Survey” 320 First Street, S.E. Washington, DC 20003 .05 postage Please keep in mind also that many of these letters and large envelopes weighed over one ounce and required .17 additional postage. In the case of a letter weighing over one ounce where the postage should have been .61, the postage was .05 The USPS lost .56 on that one piece of mail. How many organizations NATIONWIDE mailed how many pieces of mail at a “discounted” rate? *And while I’m on the subject of postage......In 2008 Rank and File members of the House and Senate earned an average of $169,300.00.....and they pay ZERO postage for their political mailings! If anyone can afford to pay for their postage it these members of the House and Senate. Go back a few paragraphs and have EVERYONE pay the SAME amount of postage. Enough said? For now, yes. Thank you for this opportunity for this postal customer to express his ideas on how to save the USPS money. In His service, Arturo J. Ortiz Sr. El Paso, TX aortiz2@elp.rr.com

    May 10, 2010
  • anon

    I've preciously mentioned that contracting out vehicle maintenance is more costly than doing work in house. I want to elaborate on that just a bit. At my VMF, management has been increaingly sending out our vehicles -statewide- to car dealerships for routing maintenance, repairs, overhaulsms, and body work. These actions have been taking work away from VMF mechanics. Of course, there is the arguement that we are not keeping up with the demand, so there is no choice; there's always two sides to a story. We have been seeing many of these outsourced vehicles come into our shop due to breakdowns and various other failures...we have discovered various faulty and/or dangerous incidents with these vehicles. When brought to mgmt's attention, we are told not to worry about it and just fix it. We have also seen numerous receipts and work orders from contractors. Contractors overcharge for work, charge for for extra on items that normally include overlap work, and have even charged for work that was never performed. We have brought these contractor charges to mgnt's attention and again told "to drop it, money is no object because contract money comes from a different postal fund, not the VMF budget." That upsets me in many ways for many reasons...but I'm particularly bothered by the fact that mgmt has no concern about the cost of vending out work and they have absolutely no intention of following up on the amounts charged by contractors or if contractors even do the work they have charged us for. There is no Checks and Balance system in place to protect the Postal Services money. According to the OIG's website, the "Fix as Fails" Strategy has been fixed. I submit that in the Omaha VMF, we are failing due to intentional ruination. PLEASE check into the intention mismanagement of the USPS's money.

    Dec 16, 2010
  • anon

    Mopar9285, I will make sure to forward this to the appropriate team within the OIG. Thank you for your comments and concern.

    Dec 20, 2010
  • anon

    I simply had to add this comment on Revenue Protection compliments of the U.S. Census Bureau. See the third statement on the About the Census Form page.... 10 questions. 10 minutes. Discover how we collect the data that matters. Every question we ask is for a specific reason, to ensure response accuracy or to determine seats in Congress. NOTE: YOU CANNOT FILL OUT THE FORM ONLINE. Viola! Revenue!!!!!!!!!!!

    Jan 07, 2010
  • anon

    I don't know about other distribution centers but the people that handle manual mail at our installation is not allowed to mark-up mail for any reason except no address. This started about two years ago and prior to that time we always marked up the mail and now we are told that we don't have the training and that it will be caught at the delivery point. We used to markup thousands of dollars a day and now we mark up nothing and I know that it is not marked up at the delivery point because they don't have the time, the people, or the training to do so. Figure it for yourself. If our small plant does one thousand a day, how much do the large plants let go. We are not talking small change we are talking hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. Bring back the markup of mail by anyone who catches a mistake.

    Dec 15, 2010
  • anon

    Happy New Tax year, affecting a new USPS Fiscal Year, with a new comment on revenue. The Health Bill Overhaul** will begin with serious implications to USPS mailings. So, I just rx'd my HighMark BC/BS (mailed) newsletter, "Looking Healthward". A reminder of my other posts regarding "Lemonade", among other technologies giving change to mail volumes, and information exchange, ie. your business model called your j-o-b.... The article depicts a "gray hair" reading his mail, and the caption of the artilce explains how the subscriber will soon, not be getting these pictured letters in the mail, along with the newsletter, the policy paperwork, and the bills, and the EOB's, and I'm assuming all "utter" mail the Post Office currently handles foir the health care industry. (BTW) the gray hair is smiling! They go on to explaing that this is "all part of (our) health care overhaul "go-green" (initiative to reduce administration expense) blah-blah-blah. Additionally, the article describes this subject mail as "clutter"!!!! Just a note on e-delivery....... and Revenue. ** Health Care Subscriber Realignment Initative Program (HCS-RIP)

    Jan 04, 2010
  • anon

    I am sorry, I should have been more specific re: clerks. I am talking more about the distribution clerks being more knowledgeable so they can catch as they sort. I do know it is hard as they have deadlines to meet in the morning. Because of that reason, I am very adamant that it very much the responsibility of the originating office to ensure that they catch any incorrect postage on their end and send it forward as postage due. To expect the destination office to have to try to audit and collect the revenue before the deadline is a little unrealistic. I think it's very imporatant for the dispatch clerk to be able to recognize any shortpaid and to tag it as short paid before send to destination. They don't realize what an important job they have. It's not just put the boxes in the cage and send it on. The big problem is everyone thinks they are doing their job but they don't seem to realize that catching shortpaid mail is part of the job also. Management all the way to the top must be made to understand that too. Their thinking must change as all of our jobs are on the line at this point in time. As for the lack of training, yes I do believe that is part of the problem. We have distribution clerks with over 15 yrs with the USPS that were not formally trained with the shape based pricing when it first went into effect several yrs ago. The window clerks have the POS machine to detect incorrect weights so that isn't really a problem.

    Dec 15, 2010
  • anon

    Thanks for the clarification, Mamamonkeyclerk.

    Dec 15, 2010
  • anon

    try to keep the revenue you already have...in the office i work at the postmaster retired and was replaced by a OIC. This person had never been in charge of an office, has not been trained to operate on POS or IRT, constantly charges customers incorrectly, we have run out of stamps, we presently have very little ready post because it is all "out of stock" for the last several months. The only reason we have flat rate boxes is because the ssa's get them from usps.com and bring them to the office because our OIC doesn't know how to order those either. We can't generate more revenue if we can't keep customers, even the small ones.

    Dec 31, 2009
  • anon

    The clerks must be more knowledgeable regarding the different pricing structures that the USPS charges so they can catch underpaid postage. Clerks should be encouraged to use common sense if something seems heavier than stated. Scales should be placed nearby to doublecheck any suspect weights. Clerks must be able to understand how to figure out dim weight pricing manually without the POS machines. They are given a worksheet but most will never have to use it as they will just rely on the POS. Common underpaid postage is the Tyvek Priority Envelope being paid for as a Flat Rate Env rather than based on weight. Chunky bubble mailers underpaid as large envelopes rather than parcel rate. Another problem is labels are printed deliberately tiny and the older clerks can't see the postage paid. Postage labels should be made to be a standardized size so it can be read easily.

    Dec 15, 2010
  • anon

    I would say it is mostly being rushed at the window. If you're working at a level 18 and up office, you have very little time allowed to do anything more than your basic jobs-sorting mail, throwing po box, working window and dispatch.

    Dec 15, 2010
  • anon

    Thank you, Mamamonkeyclerk.Those were all good points. Do you think that it is related to a lack of training, being rushed at the window, or something else? I'd like to hear what you think the reasons are.

    Dec 15, 2010
  • anon

    There is a philosophy - keep it simple silly (kiss). We sell a simple service for 70 cents that gets more time devoted to it than any of the other services we offer. I am speaking of deliver confirmation. In my small office we scan all delivery confirmation and insured articles arrived to the office, arrived to the carriers, and then the carriers scan them attempted or delivered. All articles with delivery confirmation are eventually scanned delivered. For drop shipments we add an EVS arrived scan. All this means is that each article with insurance or delivery confirmation is handled no less than three times - not including the time spent numbering the parcels for the box customers and notifying customers that the parcel await pick-up. Most of these for the 70 cent delivery confirmation service. After all this scanning one does wonder how we actually have time to deliver the mail at all. One suggestion would be that drop shipment articles be scanned by those companies into a FIRM SHEET type program which, when scanned by the post office, arrive all of the parcels in that shipment.

    Dec 21, 2009
  • anon

    You fellas still hung up on these stamps? Sorry, can't define a technology that will process such a large variation of objects, without a leak...... However, citing from financial reports from recycling operations, might provide the answer. I would suggest talking to waste management companies about how they handle this revenue protection conundrum? How many secure bytes represent $00.44? I'm quite certain some folks at the US Department of State are pondering this very same thing right now.....

    Dec 15, 2010
  • anon

    the usps should issue stock

    Dec 11, 2009
  • anon

    In the Western Pa district, letter-size mail is often run with the automated flats instead of in the DPS. This results in carriers casing plenty of mail (fletters) that should never had been handled manually. Also, our clerks and carriers are often manually sorting and casing bulk mailing rejects that were given deep discounts for automation compatibility. If we have bulk mailings rejected by our equipment, then the mailers should be back-charged at a considerably higher rate. However, if the cause is from us not maintaining equipment properly then that issue should be addressed too. Like others have stated, frequently stamps are not canceled on flat mail in this district either. Click-N-Ship items should all be weighed before going through the system as I feel a fair number of individuals are being less than honest with stated weights. An item of cost concern would be the "free" supplies we provide upon customer request. Go to YouTube and search "graffiti slaps" and you will find video after video informing viewers how to receive our supplies to use for other purposes. Perhaps a charge card and $1 fee (like we do for change of addresses) would help deter this abuse. Discounts to catalog companies should entail these mailers using us to deliver a minimal percentage of orders. If they are only interested in UPS or Fedex for delivery, then no discounts should be given. To help contain costs, Advos, Pennysavers, and other such city carrier saturation mailings should not have street addresses, but rather be addressed only as "Patron/Customer, YourTown, USA", like rural routes. This eliminates the need for carriers to put each bundle in exact sequence and would help ease some of the chaos(wasted workhours) that occurs when routes are adjusted/JRAP'd/COR'd.

    Dec 14, 2010
  • anon

    Seenoevil, Thank you for your comments. It sounds like there might be some revenue leakage in your location that would be worth management's attention. The "Neighborhood Mail" idea sounds interesting; what do others think about this?

    Dec 15, 2010
  • anon

    Please see this video to find out what the real purpose of the USPS actually is. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jv1HyL6hfWY

    Dec 09, 2009
  • anon

    We want to thank everyone for your posts here. Due to the sensitivity of some of the information provided in some of your comments, we may not be able to publicly post all of them. However, all comments, whether posted or not, are being reviewed and taken into consideration by our audit team. Please keep posting!

    Dec 14, 2010
  • anon

    As a major mailer, there are two ways to look at this issue. The first is directed at mailers who are intentionally trying to defraud the USPS by claiming discounts or classifications of mail that are not warranted. In those cases, the USPS should use the Inspection Service to intervene and punish the guilty parties according to the letter of the law. There is no place in our industry for those people. The second (and probably most likely to happen) is the everyday mailer (regardless of size) who is just trying to do the right thing and makes a mistake. In our case, because of major investments in support systems and production technologies, we expect mistakes to be the exception to the rule. There is no place in these situations for the heavy-handed approach of the Inspection Service. Unfortunately, the USPS takes the approach that everyone is treated equally when dealing with revenue problems.....they're all part of the problem and considered guilty. For the majority of mailers who fall into the category of loyal customers trying to do the right thing in a very complex, DMM regulated environment, this only creates risk in doing business with the USPS because of the severe penalties for honest mistakes, and then fear that the long arm of the law (Inspection Service) will show up at your door with a badge and a gun to impose justice. If that's the way to keep customers and attract new business, we've been doing things wrong for my entire career. Stupid us....we work out problems with our customers through continuous and immediate feedback and develop business relationships that facilitate the TRUST needed to maintain those relationships.

    Dec 09, 2009
  • anon

    While under payment and re-useage of stamps is certainly fraud against the USPS, I wonder what the value of this fraud is? Certainly major misuse should be driven out of the system and people held acountable, but what is the value proposition of revenue protection versus the value proposition of making it easier to use the Postal System? I don't know the numbers and would be interested, but I hope that the correct value of revenue protection versus improved customer service is determined. Just this morning I went to ship two packages valued at $16 postage and wanted to buy 100 stamps. I used the APC for the parcels pretty quickly but left the Post Office as the line to buy holiday stamps was very long.

    Dec 14, 2010
  • anon

    It should become SOP that all Media is inspected at acceptance point. Actually, should be SOP that Media brought to the counter is brought unsealed, then we seal it and stamo it inspected. All need to enforce guidelines. More than once I have had customers mad at me because I wouldn't let them Mail newspapers at media rate, but pm knew and allowed them. Need tyotop feeling sorry for people, if it doesn't qualify, they pay PP. Is this service really even relevant anymore? Also, need to stop letting off PMRS and PMS who steal money orders by letting them resign. Even if they confess they should be prosecuted in public to show it won't be tolerated.

    Dec 08, 2009
  • anon

    As a former processing plant employee, it was amazing to me how much mail did not get cancelled or did not have enough postage (meter and stamp). This aspect of processing is not emphasized because it might slow down the sortation operations. In addition to training, employees need to be encouraged to locate this mail and cancel the postage or collect the deficiency. Operations would have a minimal impact once employees develop good habits in this area.

    Dec 14, 2010
  • anon

    Thank you, Opportunity. Do you have any recommendations for just how employees should locate the uncancelled/shortpaid mail as it is being processed and/or how to go about collecting the postage due? We are looking for some really good, feasible answers.

    Dec 14, 2010
  • anon

    As stated by Parlament, short paid, and reuse of stamps should become a facet in employees everyday work, sorting wail. A great way to bill these identified mailings, are to have scannable package labels of which they can bill the sender for shortage paid in postage.

    Mar 31, 2015
  • anon

    this is another joke of a question. Just today Dec 7, 2009 management told clerks to STOP renting PO boxes so that management can close the processing and distribution facility in san diego ca. this facility is a needed facility but the PAC area office does not see the need.

    Dec 07, 2009
  • anon

    1. Stop paying managers and supervisors bonuses. 2. Cut back on grievences by holding management accountable for intentionally not following the contracts with unions. Also hold them equally accountable for failures, mistakes, or accidents they may have. It seems that when they screw up, nobody is on their heels with written warnings and threats of termination. Make ALL equal and people will be less likely to create these grievable situations. 3. Stop contracting out so much work and saying it save money. I’ve been around a while, I’ve served in the military and ran my own business for several years…I know it’s possible to play with statistics and math to support contracting out, but I also know that it rarely save any money and often ends up costing more in the long run. Management often claims that funds for contracting come out of another pool of money…huh? Isn’t ALL money in the pool property of the USPS? this is the type of thinking we need to change.

    Dec 14, 2010
  • anon

    Find a way to eliminate Media Mail, or to strongly discourage it's use. It is a service that is too often abused, and we lose money on it anyway. Either that, or create a special mailer just for that service so that it is not abused. Maybe even a see through mailer. Even though it is the only class of mail that is not protected against inspection, I do not want to open a media mail package for fear of accusations of rifling.

    Dec 07, 2009
  • anon

    Eliminate Media Mail if it is possible. Even though it is the only class that is not protected from examination, most office do not have the time to check the inside of the package to see if it qualifies. We lose money on every media mail piece getting sent out, and there are way too many people out there that abuse this class, whether intentional or not. I also have to agree with Mail Girl with spending a dollar to save a dime. There is way too much emphasis being placed on running individual pieces around just in case there might be an EXFC test piece in there. In my district )Philly Metro), there are processes in place for the "Blue Box Flats" and the overnight 1st class parcels where we have to log how much goes out, and the fact that it is being processed manually. We also have to type in all the DelCon numbers and zips everyday. Are we making any money on these pieces if they are being processed this way? I doubt it. A lot of excess labor just so a few district managers can get a bonus.

    Dec 13, 2010
  • anon

    Thanks, Lenny. I understand your frustration. Anyone else out there experiencing the same thing? Please let us know!

    Dec 13, 2010
  • anon
    LC

    FSS does not always cancel stamped flats -- if carriers don't hand cancel these things, they can easily be reused with a new label placed over the old -- how many carriers do you think are taking the time to cancel stamped flats?

    Dec 07, 2009

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