• on Feb 13th, 2012 in Strategy & Public Policy | 12 comments

    According to the Postal Service, greater use of electronic communication continues to drive customers away from using First-Class Mail®. Instead of buying stamps, many customers pay bills online, send ‘e-invitations’ to friends and family, and simply press “Send” when they want to communicate. These shifting customer habits will continue to speed the migration away from traditional First-Class Mail. According to the Postal Service, First-Class Mail has dropped 25 percent and single-piece First-Class Mail – letters bearing postal stamps – has declined 36 percent in the past 5 years.

    Postal Service customers and others have complained that the planned consolidations and the elimination of overnight service standards will adversely affect them. On the other hand, the Postal Service claims that these consolidations are financially necessary and create a delivery network that more accurately reflects the current volume of mail.

    1. What are your thoughts on the consolidations? 2. How will the elimination of overnight service standards affect you? This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Planning, Innovation and Optimization Directorate. NOTE: An audit report, U.S. Postal Service Presents Network Optimization Initiative, shall be issued in tandem with this blog.
  • on Jan 30th, 2012 in Strategy & Public Policy | 2 comments
    As America was expanding in the 1780s, the founding fathers realized that open access to secure and private communication among its dispersed citizens was critical to forming political groups and holding free elections without fear of retribution. The U.S. Constitution empowered Congress “to establish post offices and post roads,” the most common form of telecommunication (communication over a distance) in 1789. The founding fathers provided the necessary infrastructure to “bind” the growing nation together through communication and commerce. Thereby, the Post Office Department (now the U. S. Postal Service) was born.

    In the late 1800s, the U.S. Supreme Court, in a case involving conflicting interest between two electric telegraph companies, stated a broad interpretation of Congress’ constitutional postal powers:

    “…The powers thus granted are not confined to the instrumentalities of commerce, or the postal service known or in use when the Constitution was adopted, but they keep pace with the progress of the country, and adapt themselves to the new developments of time and circumstances. They extend from the horse with its rider to the stage coach, from the sailing vessel to the steamboat, from the coach and the steamboat to the railroad, and from the railroad to the telegraph, as these new agencies are successively brought into use to meet the demands of increasing population and wealth.” (PENSACOLA TEL. CO. V. WESTERN UNION TEL. CO., 96 U. S. 1 (1877))

    The Postal Service has modernized many times over, moving well beyond manually sorting letters and delivery mail via horse-riders. Today, however, people, government, and businesses are transitioning to using the Internet to communicate, because of lower cost and nearly instant delivery. Yet, the Internet lacks privacy and security in digital communications and transactions. In addition, Internet access is too expensive or merely unavailable for many elderly or poor citizens. While free markets excel at many things, enforcing privacy and security or providing access to disadvantaged groups have not been among the core responsibilities of the market. In America, these have historically been the duties of its representative government.

    America’s requirements for a secure national communications system have evolved since the Constitution was drafted, but the fundamental need for such a system seems to remain. Does America need secure universal digital postal services as much today as it needed traditional mail in the past? What do you think?

    This blog is hosted by the OIG’s Risk Analysis Research Center.

  • on Jul 11th, 2011 in Strategy & Public Policy | 17 comments
    The American marketplace is experiencing constant changes in the ways that companies conduct business and communicate with customers. Like other businesses, the Postal Service must also innovate to stay relevant. The Office of Inspector General plans to examine innovation processes currently used by major U.S. corporations to learn about best practices/processes. The essence of innovation is to identify a problem and develop solutions. For example, Google and Facebook are successful because their websites meet needs of people to manage and organize vast amounts of information and social relationships available on the Internet. The Postal Service has enjoyed some success with innovative products. Its Priority Mail Flat Rate products have become popular, shipping 350 million boxes over the last 6 years, with revenue of $1.2 billion in fiscal year 2010. This product met the need to simplify the shipping process and was relevant to both consumers and business. What should the Postal Service do to identify business opportunities and customer needs in order to create solutions that lead to financial success and customer satisfaction? Also, what experience(s) have you had with Postal Service innovation? This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Planning and Strategic Studies Directorate.

Pages