Think stamps are only worth the paper they’re printed on? Philatelists will tell you to think again. The tiny One-Cent Magenta stamp, now on display at the National Postal Museum, recently sold for $9.5 million. 

Of course, that sole-surviving stamp of the British Guiana penny issues is the rarest stamp in the world. Other stamps deemed collectible by the philatelic community are also worth a pretty penny. 

Take the 1918 Inverted Jenny 24-cent airmail stamp. It is one of the world’s most collectible stamps because a sheet of 100 misprinted stamps showing an upside-down biplane was accidently sold to a customer. In today’s market, an Inverted Jenny stamp could fetch close to $1 million. 

Yes, collectors are passionate about their stamps. Indeed, stamp collecting even has a month – October – designated to recognize an activity that can range from a hobby to an obsession. Two years ago to celebrate National Stamp Collecting Month, the U.S. Postal Service reissued 2.2 million Inverted Jenny souvenir stamp sheets. The souvenir stamp sheets feature six $2 stamps and sells for $12. Collectors could buy the stamps at select postal retail counters and through USPS.com, eBay.com, and by ordering via a toll free phone number. The Postal Service’s goal was to sell all 2.2 million stamp sheets in the first 60 days for $26.4 million in revenue. As of March 31, total stamp sales were about $13 million.

To generate interest in stamp collecting and engage new generations of stamp collectors, the Postmaster General requested that the Postal Service create 100 additional stamp sheets that showed the biplane upright. Seventy of these Un-Inverted Jenny stamp sheets were distributed to be sold in the top 50 markets along with 1.2 million Inverted Jenny stamp sheets. The remaining 30 Un-Inverted Jenny stamp sheets were to be randomly distributed in the first 60 days of release.

While an innovative idea, this action had the unintended consequence of creating and improperly distributing a philatelic rarity, our recent management advisory noted. The Postal Service strongly and inappropriately influenced the secondary market by creating a rarity, the report said. In 2014, at least two Un-Inverted Jenny stamp sheets sold for more than $50,000 each. Our report recommended the Postal Service develop a formal process for philatelic promotions. 

What reaction did you have to the issuance of the upright Jenny stamp? What types of activities do you think would enhance support of the philatelic program? 

Comments (383)

  • anon

    Gordon, thank you for your comments. The OIG's intention with the blog is to engage the public and encourage conversation on important topics. As you have noted, some collectors are for a lottery and some, like you, are opposed to it. It's great to hear the voices from all levels.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    The limited edition 'Upright Jenny' pane was a wonderful idea. I am sure it led to lot of sales from people hoping to find one of the 100 panes that would not have otherwise spent $12.00 for six $2.00 stamps that they probably don't have a ready use for. When one knows that he/she has the chance to obtain something scarce and desirable, the thrill of the hunt is on. At our local stamp club show, we awarded one of the unopened panes every hour to a random show attendee. There was quite a bit of excitement over the drawings. Finally, you have to admit that this promotion has generated a lot of 'buzz' for the USPS and while some of it is negative, it does promote philately and the products from the USPS. I think the decision to print a limited number of 'Upright Jenny' panes is the kind of innovative thinking that will only help promote our great hobby. Congratulations.

    Sep 10, 2015
  • anon

    Frederick, thanks for your positive comments. It's wonderful to hear the pros and cons from those in the philatelic community.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    I want to commend the fine, detailed work by the USPS Inspector General in detailing its findings on the matter of the artificially manufactured rarity of the Upright Jenny. I'm nearly 48 years old and have been collecting stamps since early childhood, following in the footsteps of my father. The poor state of the domestic stamp collecting hobby is underscored by the facts and circumstances of the Upright Jenny fiasco. My immediate and continued reaction is that I am disgusted that the USPS wanted to get itself into the business of conducting a game-of-chance lottery as a means to "spark interest" in the hobby. As many other commenters have stated, rarities should happen organically through the stamp design, manufacturing, and distribution process. Artificially induced rarities are not rarities at all. They are intentionally-produced limited editions - nothing more that that and maybe something less. I agree with other commenters that if the USPS wished to invest in reinvigorating the hobby of stamp collecting it would first return to the manufacture of soakable stamps. Moreover, it would eliminate the recent folly of creating semi-postal stamps which had no prior postal heritage in this country, and it would embark on a strategic commemorative issuance approach that does not otherwise inundate the market with a plethora of new issues. Additionally, the USPS presence in public grade schools is all but non-existent. What better investment could the USPS make in its own future and in the future of the stamp collecting hobby than to work with local school boards or school principals on a national "USPS Stamp Collecting Day" where representatives of the local post office (who may even be parents of kids in the school system itself) could bring a very beginner, low cost, few-page, computer designed stamp album and a box of mixtures to introduce the hobby to a classroom of the most impressionable population among us? If such an idea were introduced, then perhaps the American Philatelic Society could partner with the USPS to create Junior APS-type affiliates within the grade schools where the American Philatelist magazine could arrive monthly and become part of the reading and social studies curriculum. There is much opportunity for the USPS and organizations like the American Philatelic Society to give new life to an old hobby that can teach us all about history, geography, culture, sports, and business. A USPS OIG "white paper" on this topic would be a most welcome development. Thank you for reviewing my reply and indulging my thoughts.

    Sep 10, 2015
  • anon

    Mark, thanks for taking the time to comment and share your opinions. So many have commented on the soakable stamps and your suggestion to promote in schools is interesting. This particular blog has sparked in interest in the community and we do consider the comments for future audits and reviews.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    Hey, grumblers and fault finders are everywhere. The fact of the matter is that stamp collectors have been griping for years (at least since self-adhesives became common), that the USPS doesn't do anything for or care about stamp collectors. Well the USPS finally did something fun and interesting and now the philatelic community whines about it being contrived. Chill, you stodgy old timers, the Upright Jenny golden ticket search was fun. Fun, you remember what that is right? Sheesh.

    Sep 10, 2015
  • anon

    Thanks for your comments, Doe. We continue to encourage (and be amazed) by the varied opinions of the collectors. The passion is quite evident through all these comments both for and against the Jenny stamp sheets.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    I think the USPS putting out an extremely limited issue of right-side-up Jenny stamps then pimping the collecting community by suggesting that if they buy enough of the regular Jenny-invert stamps they might find one of the 100 is nothing short of obscene.

    Sep 10, 2015
  • anon

    At first, I thought the issuance of 100 special panes was a good idea: I bought two panes and stopped. Others apparently bought many more, hoping to find a rarity. Then people found out that the distribution system was flawed, etc. Then, I thought about the old Postmaster Farley who printed special stamps for his stamp collecting friend FDR, himself and a select group of philatelic or otherwise friends--he intentionally created rarities. The proverbial manure hit the fan when his limited printing of stamps was revealed. The subsequent printing of millions of those stamps became known as Farley's Follies. Farley attempted to create intentionally manufactured rarities and that is exactly what happened with this Jenny sheet. The only honorable path is to reprint the error sheet in large quantities and offer over the counter and through the fulfillment center to collectors. The USPS will have to take the hit on printing costs, etc. A costly lesson but a necessary one. Someone should have asked Postmaster Farley's ghost. Do the right thing, USPS. Stamper

    Sep 10, 2015
  • anon

    Hi Stamper. Like you, many remember and have commented on Farley's Follies. And, like you, many support an additional printing of the Jenny stamp sheets. Thanks for taking the time to comment.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    Far from "an innovative idea", more like "an idiotic idea".

    Sep 10, 2015
  • anon

    I have nothing but contempt for the postal officials behind the upright Jenny scheme. This includes at the top of the list former Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe. The scheme was illegal from the start and now we find that fraud and personal dishonesty were also present. The solution should be crystal clear: punitive action for the individuals involved and the printing of new upright Jennies identical in all respects to the 100 sheets already printed. Quantities of the new upright Jenny printing should be similar to that of already issued inverted Jennies. Without serious consequences for the persons involved in this mess, collectors can expect more of the same dishonest business practices from the USPS.

    Sep 09, 2015
  • anon

    Intentionally creating rarities is a mistake and against regulations. Informing the public the 100 sheets were randomly distributed, when they actually weren't was a lie. Gifting sheets is against regulations. The remaining sheets should be inserted randomly in the retail system (correctly this time) and this kind of stunt should not be tried again. To enhance philatelic support: * Return to soakable stamp media (paper and adhesive). Not that we get many letters these days, but good luck to modern collectors that want to soak the stamps off their covers. * Return to meaningful subjects for stamps, that represent significant achievements and historical events in the US. * Focus on artistic quality and design of stamps. You have only to look at some of the beautiful designs from certain European countries to feel deep shame about US designs. * If someone is well meaning enough to actually use a stamp, USPS should at least have the decency to cancel the stamps properly. No more marker cancels and do the best to reduce the number of uncancelled covers. * Provide a means for collectors of all financial means to acquire each individual US stamp. Requiring that collectors purchase entire stamp coils, press sheets, or year sets is killing the incentive to collect modern stamps.

    Sep 08, 2015
  • anon

    Hi Lewis. We appreciate you taking the time to let us know what stamp collectors are looking for.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    the creation of artificial rarities is a bad thing. One would think that the history of the Pickett and Farley issues would have given ample warning of what might go wrong, with the former being an attempt to right a wrong and the latter a mere sop to monied supporters. i think USPS marches ever faster into philatelic irrelevance as they generate "special" things while abandoning those traditional forms that already had tons of supporters (PNCs, PBs, to name two). How many new collectors are likely to emerge from a ploy designed to frustrate them and make all of us losers. Hmmmm. I can't think of a worse experiment in classical conditioning. And, for the Postal Service to think it's making money: nope, those $2 uprights will find their way into the secondary market as discount postage diminishing sales of future higher priced stamps over postal counters. only well-healed dealers, speculators, and the very occasional lucky stiff will be happy. yes, once again, marketers at USPS have found ways to make most of their customers mad, or, worse, indifferent.

    Sep 08, 2015
  • anon

    Appalling group think; an open & transparent process would have averted this poor outcome. The USPS is busy exploiting collectors, and dare not listen to them. For example, collectors like 'completeness'. The stunning array of 'philatelic products' being produced by the USPS makes completeness impossible - no one is going to spend hundreds of dollars every year at the USPS - and the onesy-twosy buyers of movie star souvenir sheets (for example) do not a steady customer base make. Cheers,

    Sep 08, 2015
  • anon

    In my experience this program has not been well accepted by stamp collectors. I personally view it as a cheap gimmick which was not properly explained or fairly administered. The philatelic program would be enhanced by the issuance of stamps that stamp collectors truly appreciate. One aspect of the inverted Jenny stamps was intended to fulfill by being printed by means of an engraved metal plate. The reasons why people collect stamps are quite varied, but some consensus can be had on what most stamp collectors want. 1. Stamps made with high-quality printing processes. Gravure and in some instances lithography are considered to be higher-quality printing methods. This is the reason why the engraver Czeslaw Slania became a superstar among stamp collectors, and his stamps are widely collected and collectible. 2. Pressure sensitive stamps may be popular with some, but are not popular with stamp collectors. If the backing does not separate exactly the same way as the stamp, there can be edges which over time can pick up dirt and dust over time. This also makes it very challenging to remove stamps from envelopes to collect them. Perhaps a mix of pressure sensitive and gummed stamps might be the answer to appeal to stamp collectors and still offer convenience to those who send out Christmas cards and the like. 3. Most collectors tend to prefer "classic" stamps, those printed prior to 1940. This is due not only to the more appealing printing methods mentioned above, but because the designs for the stamps contained great detail and beauty. Features which are quite often lacking in contemporary stamps. 4. Availability of stamps has been an issue. The primary method which some stamp collectors use to get new US stamps is to visit their local post office. I have heard stamp collectors complain that they were not able to get new issues of stamps at their local post office because they were not ordered. 5. An aspect of collecting the stamps of your country of origin (in this case, the USA) is a certain pride and patriotism. This means that postage stamps are appealing because of how they represent our country. We want our US stamps to make us proud of our country. I hope this helps give a stamp collector's view of what would make the USPS Philatelic program more successful. Thanks, Antonio

    Sep 08, 2015
  • anon

    I concur that the USPS should NOT have intentionally generated a philatelic rarity. Not only because of USPS policy, but because I resent the USPS intentionally generating a product that I'll have no realistic chance to collect. I suggest this solution: 1) As with the Hammarskjold error, the USPS should generate sufficient quantities of right-side up Jennys for collectors; 2) the USPS should reimburse secondary purchasers of the original right-side up Jennys (with sufficient proof of purchase, of course).

    Sep 07, 2015
  • anon

    I stopped collecting new US issues when the PO created a 'rarity' by raffling off the Legends of the West error sheets! Deliberate creation of a rarity - against the policy of USPS. Now they have created - deliberately and with complete knowledge of what they were doing - another rarity. To top off the violation of their own policy USPS has lied (that is the true non-PC word, rather than the political "misspoke'). The initial news of the issue was that the 100 sheets were distributed at random throughout the issue. The distribution was NOT random, anyone not living in one of the 50 top market places was SOL for finding an uninverted sheet. And now we learn that a number of sheets were retained for distribution to customers of the Fulfillment Center! This has been a totally improper handling of the issue by USPS. In the business world, someone would have been fired for this deliberate creation of a rarity and the subsequent lies to the public and especially to the collecting public. The USPS has done more to hinder the hobby than to enhance it. The $2 Inverted / Uninverted Jenny program now appears to be a marketing scheme to make more revenue by tricking collectors to by the stamps in the hope of getting the uninvert! My personal feeling is that someone should be punished severely for trying to undo the hobby. Any serious collector would have been able to tell USPS that it was a bad program when it first went around the decision table! Anyone with a modicum of legal training would have realized that it borders on a criminal conspiracy. The phrase "bait and switch" comes to mind along with several others like criminal conspiracy and others! As you can tell, I am not happy with the program in the least. It has done much to hurt the hobby.

    Sep 07, 2015
  • anon

    They should have printed the same amount of both sheets.

    Sep 07, 2015
  • anon

    The concept was well intended and did generate a lot of collector interest and it probably should have not been done in the first place. But, the most upsetting aspect is the way the sheets were NOT randomly distributed! I have found out that large volume post offices were targeted initially, making my small town (12,000 population) office less likely to have ever had a "random" sheet! I do have a use for $2 postage and am willing to continue obtaining the sheets for a shot at getting one of the remaining sheets. But, where do I go to buy them to have any chance at all? My local post office (which has obtained additional replacements)? A larger area post office? The stamp fulfillment center? It is too bad that these sheets were not really randomly distributed!

    Sep 07, 2015
  • anon

    Hi Roger. Stay tuned for more information. The Postal Service is currently assessing how best to hand the unsold Un-Inverted Jenny stamp sheets. The OIG will be providing oversight. At the time of our audit, 57 stamp sheets remained in inventory at the Post Offices in the top 50 markets. Twenty-three stamp sheets remained at the Stamp Fulfillment Services.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    I purchased 25 sheets at my local post office, in Moncks Corner, SC. I opened about half of them. I knew my purchase of $300 at the time was a chance to find a rarity, and that there was a good chance that I would have $300 in postage for future use. I was ok with that. Now I find there was zero chance of me finding one of the error sheets, and that postal employees were aware of the deception. When I bought the group I looked carefully at each package before opening any of them. I noticed that many were not sealed well. I was also aware that there was a "note" inserted or included with the error stamps. I wondered if the note could be detected in the error packages, by weight or thickness. I wondered how they were distributed. Were they randomly included during the insertion process during the general run? Were they produced separately, including package insertion and sealing? Now I find that all of my concerns were valid and that I wasted my money. After the recent economic downturn, I feel lucky to find a labor job making a low wage rate. I have a degree and a 30 year career behind me of management with integrity. I am a life long collector of postal history, and a member of the American Philatelic Society since 1974. I have been a supporter of the postal service, and one who believes that the universal postal service is an important public trust, one that should be supported in a free society, not one that should be closed or diminished in lieu of private, for profit concerns. I feel duped by the USPS, and foolish for spending my hard earned money in pursuit of a dream that never had a chance of coming true. I hope the service will do something to make this right for the collectors like myself who feel deeply betrayed. The elimination of the beautifully engraved an printed perforated postage stamps in lieu of cheap Avery labels will insure that fewer and fewer potential collector will enter the hobby, making the potential that a costly life long will see any future appreciation bleak. Learning that the excitement of a chance to find an actual collecting rarity was a fraud has really rocked me. I would gladly return the products to post office for a refund, if that were possible. Shame on the USPS for not planning and executing a fair process. The lack of integrity has insured that I will never fall for another offering.

    Nov 26, 2015
  • anon

    The creation and improper distribution of a philatelic rarity was an *intended* consequence; indeed, it was the whole point. This sort of thing is unworthy of the USPS, and damages the prestige of the United States. It's the sort of thing done by third-rate stamp issuers that rarely deliver mail. This is nothing but a lottery from which USPS receives the proceeds without having to put up the prize. One wonders whether it's legal. One blushes at the thought that it might be.

    Sep 06, 2015
  • anon

    Thanks for your comments, Brad. The legalities of the issue are discussed in our full report (link provided in the blog).

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    As a longtime collector I was saddened by the USPS decision to not only create an intentional rarity to enhance sales, but also to decide which "high volume" offices would receive some of them, effectively negating the touted "randomness" of the distribution. It seems that in recent years the bottom line has been at the forefront of USPS decisions rather than honoring the great achievements and people of our country. While this strategy may enhance sales in the short term, collectors of fairly modest means will seek other avenues to satisfy their interests. In my particular case, I made the very difficult decision this year to stop collecting US new issues and to concentrate on building as complete as possible collection of the stamps of Vietnam.

    Sep 06, 2015
  • anon

    The error should have never been made in the first place but they were made. You should confiscate the remaining upright jennys and a lottery should be held similar to the Legends of the West in 1994. That way everyone would have an equal chance. One valid address and $12.00, one chance to win a sheet.

    Sep 06, 2015
  • anon

    Thank you for your suggestions, Kama. The Postal Service is currently addressing the unsold Jenny stamp sheets and the OIG will provide oversight of the decision.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    Very disappointed. Don’t ever do that again...ever. --Stop all sales of the Jenny souvenir sheet. --Inventory what’s left. --Recall and receive all inventory. --Re-shuffle the upright-Jenny panes into the remaining Jenny-upside-down panes. --Re-distribute all inventory as originally promised without any exceptions nor favoritisms. Lost USPS integrity far outweighs the money.

    Sep 05, 2015
  • anon

    The upright jenny pane was a bad idea and not good for the hobby. I have been collecting for almost 65 years and this added nothing to the hobby. The same goes for the circus stamp that can only be obtained if you buy the annual stamp set for $66.80. Not a great buy. But they did get my $66.80.

    Sep 05, 2015
  • anon

    I thought that the idea of the intended upright Jennys was not a bad one. However when three of the randomly mixed sets were sent to individuals, it raised questions about just how random the mix was. If someone could lay their hands on any of the stamps, the entire process comes into question. With that in mind, I would have to say that someone should take a very close look at how many of the upright Jennys were made available and if they are all accounted for.

    Sep 05, 2015
  • anon

    Thank you for your comments, Rick. Our full report (the blog provides a link) discusses the accountability of all the stamp sheets, at the time of our audit. As shown on page 2, the 30 Un-Inverted Jenny stamp sheets at the Stamp Fulfillment Services were separated and kept in a secure location.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    Although I thought it was a fantastic idea for generating interest into our hobby of collecting stamps, I don't believe it should have been done by intentionally creating a scarce item that can't be obtained by the average collector, especially when the USPS lied to us about how these rarities were randomly distributed into the general population of unadulterated Jenny panes. I tried to obtain one by purchasing hundreds of dollars’ worth of the Jenny’s, only to find out later that some had been held back, and that they had not been randomly seeded as reported. So, basically I threw my money away, but hopefully I’ll use the stamps eventually, even though they’re not ‘forever’. What a disappointment!

    Sep 05, 2015
  • anon

    It was a great idea if they did not lie about random distribution. Spent 1500.00 at different post offices to possibly get one to find out the distribution was not random but to high volume post offices. Credibility of the post office completely non existent.

    Sep 04, 2015
  • anon

    Hi Edward. On page 4 of our report, we do discuss the negative impact on the public's trust in the Postal Service. We sincerely hope our recommendations result in a stronger program that benefits collectors worldwide.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    Not a healthy decision for the hobby. Themes were supposed to have been randomly inserted but then we hear that at least one sheet was sent to a collector, clearly showing that all 100 were not randomly inserted. I think a full investigation of that whole program is in order.

    Sep 04, 2015
  • anon

    Hi John. This blog supports the OIG's Office of Audit's report on philatelic initiatives. The Office of Investigations handles employee misconduct. Thank you for taking the time to express your opinion.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    I was really disappointed when I learned that the USPS had intentionally create and distributed philatelic rarities. I believe the USPS should be seeking to create an even playing field rather than creating an imbalance. All in all it was a bad decision.

    Sep 04, 2015
  • anon

    I appreciate being able to comment. Unlike the naysayers, I believe the right-side-up Jenny "error" is good for the hobby, despite it being against regulations. I bought 10 of the sheets hoping to find the error, but alas, I did not. Still, I didn't mind spending the $120 although I called a halt after buying the last one. I shared the sheets with other collectors including one in South Africa, keeping only one for myself. I think of the right-side-up panes as new stimuli for the hobby. With stamp collectors' magazines to major daily newspapers publishing stories of the people who were fortunate to buy the error, the hobby benefited by its possible attraction to new collectors. I am 80, having collected since my early teens, and enjoying all of it. Bill Baab, Augusta, Georgia

    Sep 04, 2015
  • anon

    Hi Bill. We really appreciate your interest in stamp collecting and our blog. You are certainly not alone in your opinion. Several positive comments about the issue have been shared and are trending. It is great to hear from those who are most compassionate about stamp collecting.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    If it true that " Some [error] panes were inappropriately given to collectors by Stamp Fullfillment Services as gift, we have a very serious ethical problem! I would like to see more engraved stamps which required the exceptional talent of a trained engraver rather than more uninteresting labels. Thanks!

    Sep 03, 2015
  • anon

    I feel used and abused by this whole mess. I live in a small town in Northern Wisconsin. I assumed a level playing field in the program. I have purchased over 400 packets of the stamp. When we were told randomly distributed I took that to mean exactly what it said. Then I found the 70% of these went to "major" markets and some were held out and just given out to customers. That is sure not a level playing field I am now thinking back to what was done with the mess that Postmaster Farley with the imperforate stamps were created and later what was done when the Dag Hammarskjold error stamps came out. I think that the postal service should do another run of the stamps with the center upright, sell them over the counter at the Post Offices, and just call it a day. This program was certainly not fair to all customers. Shame on the USPS

    Sep 03, 2015
  • anon

    Hi William and thanks for taking the time to send in your thoughts. The OIG's report (on page 4) did discuss the unfair advantage some customers had over others. We sincerely hope our recommendations result in a stronger program and honor those collectors in the philatelic community.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    If only, the Jenny inverts would have been offered at the Forever price, I would have bought hundreds of them. Regardless if I ever found one of the "upright Jenny's" I could use those beautiful stamps on regular mail, but NO, I have no use for $2.00 stamps. Think about it!

    Sep 02, 2015
  • anon

    Hi Norm. Thanks for expressing your opinion on the stamp denomination. Several others share your viewpoint.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    An error on purpose? 100 panes sold randomly --except for those given to "special" people? Bull crap ! Forget the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Panama Canal, still one of the greatest engineering wonders of the world. Instead we get Janis Joplin and Jimmy Hendrix, soon-to-be-forgotten dope-head "musicians" (some say) clever enough to kill themselves with illegal drugs. Great roll models for our youth. Take your bright ideas for along walk on a short pier. I've given up collecting US stamps. PS Clean up your act getting the mail out on time.

    Sep 01, 2015
  • anon

    I am very UPSET to find out my dollars BUYING the JENNY from the Fulfillment Center was just a waste of time and money. I would not have bought any if I knew the 100 ERROR sheets were not mixed in and distributed evenly or justly. This is what was in the news releases and I even asked a question to the USPS through Ebay, BUT when I asked I received back a very LOUD yes, you could possibly receive one of the INVERTED INVERTS.. I made most of my purchases through Ebay and now find out my chances were ZERO! Now I find out I was played a fool of, because the sheets are sitting elsewhere not even distributed. So where can I return my sheets too! Steve

    Sep 01, 2015
  • anon

    This kind of nonsense should STOP! The ONLY way to fix this is to do what they did in 1934 while that moron Farley was at the helm!

    Sep 01, 2015
  • anon

    The upright Jenny was another attempt by the USPS to bilk collectors. I do use the new inverted jenny stamps on my packages and over-seas mail. Recipients love them. The best way to enhance support of the philatelic program is to return to water-soluble stamps. Soaking stamps is an excellent pastime and an easy way to introduce kids to stamp collecting.

    Sep 01, 2015
  • anon

    Great! Another shout out for soakable stamps. Thanks for your opinion, Ken.

    Sep 11, 2015

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