Think stamps are only worth the paper they’re printed on? Philatelists will tell you to think again. The tiny One-Cent Magenta stamp, now on display at the National Postal Museum, recently sold for $9.5 million. 

Of course, that sole-surviving stamp of the British Guiana penny issues is the rarest stamp in the world. Other stamps deemed collectible by the philatelic community are also worth a pretty penny. 

Take the 1918 Inverted Jenny 24-cent airmail stamp. It is one of the world’s most collectible stamps because a sheet of 100 misprinted stamps showing an upside-down biplane was accidently sold to a customer. In today’s market, an Inverted Jenny stamp could fetch close to $1 million. 

Yes, collectors are passionate about their stamps. Indeed, stamp collecting even has a month – October – designated to recognize an activity that can range from a hobby to an obsession. Two years ago to celebrate National Stamp Collecting Month, the U.S. Postal Service reissued 2.2 million Inverted Jenny souvenir stamp sheets. The souvenir stamp sheets feature six $2 stamps and sells for $12. Collectors could buy the stamps at select postal retail counters and through USPS.com, eBay.com, and by ordering via a toll free phone number. The Postal Service’s goal was to sell all 2.2 million stamp sheets in the first 60 days for $26.4 million in revenue. As of March 31, total stamp sales were about $13 million.

To generate interest in stamp collecting and engage new generations of stamp collectors, the Postmaster General requested that the Postal Service create 100 additional stamp sheets that showed the biplane upright. Seventy of these Un-Inverted Jenny stamp sheets were distributed to be sold in the top 50 markets along with 1.2 million Inverted Jenny stamp sheets. The remaining 30 Un-Inverted Jenny stamp sheets were to be randomly distributed in the first 60 days of release.

While an innovative idea, this action had the unintended consequence of creating and improperly distributing a philatelic rarity, our recent management advisory noted. The Postal Service strongly and inappropriately influenced the secondary market by creating a rarity, the report said. In 2014, at least two Un-Inverted Jenny stamp sheets sold for more than $50,000 each. Our report recommended the Postal Service develop a formal process for philatelic promotions. 

What reaction did you have to the issuance of the upright Jenny stamp? What types of activities do you think would enhance support of the philatelic program? 

Comments (381)

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  • anon

    I got a call from the US labor department. I had been calling them pushing the subject of why they had never filed criminal charges against Edwards... They stated the statute of limitations had run out.. Well--yes because when I brought it to their attention about 100 times they would not do anything about it.. But I guess they did do something about it----they did nothing on purpose... Beware people----the US Post office is giving postal contracts to companies that repeatedly don't pay their employees the correct wages. In my case I was only paid half the wages. SCAM------this would fit a "Whistle Blower" case, but the government does nothing. SCAM

    Nov 14, 2017
  • anon

    I have been a stamp collector for several years. Personally, I have no problem with the US Postal Service creating the occasional rare collectable. I think it helps keep interest in the hobby and generates some interesting news. Many of my fellow collectors may disagree with me, but that's how I feel.

    Aug 28, 2017
  • anon

    Good day. I have in my possession a one cent inverted jenny postage stamp that my grandmother gave to me more than forty years ago among some other American stamps and from other countries. I would like to sell my inverted jenny postage stamp.

    Aug 23, 2017
  • anon

    Beware America the United States Post Office (USA) is wasting your hard earned taxes. Edwards Postal Service in Lake Charles, LA has used up 2 out of there 3 appeals. This means you the tax payer are paying for court cost. This case has been dragging on in the courts about 8 years . This company previously was ordered to pay back wages for not paying their contract carriers the correct amount, but yet the United States Post Office continued to give them postal contracts. I did not know when I went to work for this company that this had previously happened. Then of course Edwards Postal Service in Lake Charles, La does the same thing again not just to me but LOTS of employees. So, here again tax payers are paying the price. The USA tax payers flip the bill to take this company to court again. So, it wasn't just the employees working for Edwards Postal Service that lost money it was all of America. Why would the United States Post Office keep doing this over and over again?

    Aug 21, 2017
  • anon

    The United States Post Office participates in mail fraud. I used to haul mail for Edwards Postal Service. The company is in Lake Charles, La... The United States Post Office keeps giving Edwards contracts knowing they have been guilty of not paying their employees the correct wages. The US Post Office was "mailing" checks to the Edwards that was supposed to go only to the employees/ drivers. Edwards Postal Service was cashing the checks and keeping the money for themselves. I brought this up to an employee of the Department of Labor. I stated this was a perfect example of Mail Fraud. He (Sal-- Dept of Labor employee) looked into it. He agreed. He read off a signed by the Edwards. The form gave the criminal code penalty for cashing the check and using it for anything else but what it was intended for. Sal/ the Dept of Labor Employee agreed -- it was mail fraud. But Sal stated he could not do anything about it...... So America, be aware of the US Post Office. They themselves will benefit from mail fraud. This case would probably qualify as a whistle blower case. Edwards Postal Service in Lake Charles, La keeps getting contracts because they put in the lowest bid. They can submit the lowest bid because they do not abide by the contract. The US Post Office keeps giving Edwards Postal Service contracts despite the fact that the drivers for Edwards are not being paid correctly. I was told by Sal (Dept of Labor Employee) I'm owed $30,000 by Edwards Postal Service. He was honest--- he said forget about it----- you will never see it. My daughter was born during this time. We need the money. Thanks United States Post Office for stealing from my family. Thanks for benefiting from Mail Fraud.

    Jul 17, 2017
  • anon

    Nice article

    May 28, 2017
  • anon

    Can you still buy inverted Jenny stamps. I stopped at a few post offices with no luck.

    May 26, 2017
  • anon

    The inverted Jenny souvenir sheet was intended to commemorate the issuance of an unplanned error in 1918. While the individual stamps in the sheet could be used for postage, stamp collectors purchased this for the novelty of owning an inverted jenny. The intentional issuance of 100 uninverted jenny souvenir sheet added to the novelty and resulted in people buying large quantities of sheets merely to obtain this rarity. Greed motivated those buyers, hoping to get a rare sheet they could profit from. The way the sheets were packaged prevented anyone from knowing exactly which package contained the 100 uninverted sheets. The statements that the special sheets were distributed only to metropolitan centers is false because nobody could know for certain which packages were unique. Any post office that had Jenny souvenir could have one or more of the 100 sheets. As a lifelong avid stamp collector I would not sell the uninverted sheet if I found one but rather would keep and enjoy it. Anyone who thinks the PO should not have created this rarity shouldn't buy the sheet. The math isn't on your side....100/2.2 million = 1/22,000 chance of getting one. Very long odds.

    Jan 28, 2017
  • anon

    Have all the upright Jenny stamp souvenir sheets been accounted for?

    Jan 21, 2017
  • anon

    No. There are over 60 left unaccounted for.

    Jan 28, 2017
  • anon

    I bought one set of stamps hoping to get the upright Jenny. I bought it today because i think its fun. We have not opened it yes as we are waiting for Christmas when I will give it to my uncle (he collects stamps) I think all of those complaining out there are curmudgeons and should try and enjoy life. My advice is not to spend more than you can afford on stamps or anything else. its just a fun thing to do, not unlike buying a single lottery ticket. Lighten up folks!

    Dec 19, 2016
  • anon

    How many upright Jenny stamp souvenir sheets have been reported?

    Dec 18, 2016
  • anon

    I think it is disgraceful that the US Post Office should create a deliberate rarity that most cannot collect. They should issue this stamp sheet on mass so anyone can buy it.

    Nov 26, 2016
  • anon

    How many of the un-inverted Jenny stamps have been reported to the us post master, and is there a list of post offices that now have the Jenny stamp. Thanking you in advance for your help.

    Oct 05, 2016
  • anon

    Thanking you all for your support

    Jan 04, 2017
  • anon

    I think the USPS has been unduly fettered by outmoded and restrictive regulations. To me, the sweepstakes initiated with the Jenny is a welcome breath of fresh air. I think that many initiatives ought to be done without "permission" and if there is an official outcry later, just say "I'm sorry". For complainers who say that winning sheets (tickets) were not evenly distributed I ask: How could 100 sheets be equally distributed? Compare this to a lottery in which the lottery authority makes no particular profit from its tickets. Who knows when your winning lottery number will turn up? The whole thing is supposed to be random. Randomness does not mean equality, but by chance. Besides, the Jenny is always good for postage, so this is even better than a lottery where you loose all investment. After all, do you hold on to your loosing lottery tickets? Use it and carry on.

    Jul 27, 2016
  • anon

    I have read most of the comments posted here about the un-inverted Jennys. Notwithstanding any of the questionable practices of the USPS in regard to the 100 panes of the un-inverted Jenny's, I have two questions: (1) at this point in time, approximately how many have been discovered, and (2) where are the undiscovered panes likely to be, that is, where would one go searching/buying to possibly acquire one at this point. Thanks to anyone who can give counsel.

    Jul 02, 2016
  • anon

    What was done by the P.O.--the uninverted Jenny-- is outrageous, not funny and borders on fraud, a forgery of sorts--just simple mercenary tactics of modern America. Incredible.

    Jun 14, 2016
  • anon

    I wish you would print Merle Haggard stamps. He passed away on his 79th birthday, April 7th, 2016. He is a true American success story, from being in prison to becoming a country music legend. Thank you.

    Jun 02, 2016
  • anon

    So here I am innocently buying Jennys here and there and a few on-line hoping to be a winner and people are saying that this is a scam. I am extremely disappointed as I have other things I could be spending my hard earned money on than a scam. I really thought this was a legitimate and fair distribution of the upright $2.00 Jennys. I am always too trusting. Very sad! Debbie

    May 21, 2016
  • anon

    Did the final distribution follow the plan you outlined in this statement? Are any uninverted Jenny's still available at the philatelic distribution center for mail ordering?

    Apr 26, 2016
  • anon

    I had the pleasure of being in attendance at the $2 Jenny First Day Ceremony at the National Postal Museum in Washington, D.C. on September 22, 2013. At the end of this great program, like other philatelists, I stood in line to have my program signed by all the speakers. When PMG Patrick Donahoe was signing my program, I gently teased him about the 24c 1918 Jenny inverts and wouldn't it be interesting if it happened again with the release of this Jenny. To my great embarrassment, the demeanor of PMG Donahoe immediately changed, and he become noticeably quiet and stoic. I had no intention of soliciting such a jaundiced response with my comment! Only later, with the public announcements of the 100 "seeded" un-inverted Jennies, could I understand his initial reaction. I have attended about 30 first day ceremonies - obviously, this one remains the most vivid for me. Musing the print run of 2.2 million Jennies and the somewhat un-equable distribution of 100 un-inverted Jennies, has not precluded my enthusiasm from purchasing 374 panes, to date. I have obtained them in nearly equal quantities from the KC Caves, my local P.O. (20817), and E-Bay. I buy 15 panes each month with the sole intent of perhaps getting lucky - which hasn't happened. No, I don't eventually expect to be in that joyful minority and actually obtain an un-inverted Jenny pane. No, I don't have a justifiable usage for my pile of $12 panes. Yes, my remarkable wife remains understanding. Yes, I've got some great stories regarding my "hunt" for this very elusive stamp and I couldn't be happier! I embrace philately, in all its dimensions. It's all about the journey, not the destination. I will continue purchasing 15 panes each month until the sales are either halted or exhausted. For those who maybe disenchanted with this $12 pane, and their bleak prospect of obtaining an un-inverted Jenny pane, I offer this suggestion: their purchase is completely voluntarily.

    Apr 24, 2016
  • anon

    I know of one person who is very happy with the upright Jenny: he got one, and he sold it for a great price. That's one. the rest of us.... speaking for myself, I HATE any program that is intended to create a rarity that intentionally leaves some, usually most, of us unfulfilled. I mean, why? The Jenny is designed to do just that. I bought several envelopes of the Jennys, for postage, and hoped for a great outcome. Similar problems are involved wit the circus sheet and the recent Botannical issue that i understand Mystic purchased even before the issue date. Why bother. these kinds of issuing and sales policies drive the casual collector out of the market. anyway, you asked....

    Feb 23, 2016
  • anon

    Any update on the disposition plan for the remaining Jenny $2 error sheets?

    Feb 19, 2016
  • anon

    how am i going to get a jenny when the post office gives them to big orders from st.louis, i have purchase over 75 from st.louis and im a old man on a fixed income. i would just like a fair chance to get one thank you bob haggerty

    Jan 05, 2016
  • anon

    I found this site by accident; I was just trying to find out many of the upright Jenny sheets had turned up. As I read the comments by various individuals, I was chagrined to learn that I had been deceived (to put it mildly) by the USPS. When I first read that USPS was issuing a sheet commemorating the inverted Jenny stamp, and that there would be 100 sheets of stamps with the Jenny upright presumably mixed in randomly with the rest, I was determined to order a few sheets. I first tried the local Post Office, which did not have any sheets. Of course at the time, I did not realize that even if the local Post Office did have any sheets, the liklihood that there would be an upright Jenny sheet among them was zero, since I live in a small town. So I picked up a copy of the USA Philatelic catalog that I found at the PO, and sure enough, it listed the Jenny sheet - moreover, there even was a blurb mentioning the 100 sheets with the Jenny upright, and a statement to the effect that "not all of them have been found." So I sent in a small order. I don't recall the date of the order; perhaps at that time I actually had a slight chance of finding a sheet of the upright Jennys (of course I did not). When the stamps came, there was a new issue of the catalog, which continued to offer the Jenny sheets - however, I did notice that there no longer was any mention of the existence of the 100 upright Jenny sheets. I did not take this to mean that there was no longer a chance of finding a sheet of the upright Jennys; trusting that the upright sheets were truly randomly distributed i assumed that as long as there were sheets left to sell, there was still a liklihood of finding one of the upright sheets. Over the next few months I sent in at least three more orders, all (luckily) small. Mind you, I have absolutely no use for $2 stamps; without the possibility of finding a rarity, I would perhaps have ordered one sheet at most. Having now learned that the 100 upright sheets were not randomly distributed, that small town Post Offices had zero chance of having any of the sheets, that most if not all of my catalog purchases also had a zero chance of finding a sheet, I am not pleased. The USPS needs to redress this situation. I see a divergence in view among other collectors, but I would lean toward a lottery of the remaining sheets, with those individuals who purchased sheets previously not knowing the true facts given preference in entering the lottery.

    Nov 06, 2015
  • anon

    I think it is yet another example of dishonesty by an agency that has been frequently dishonest with the public. The manufactured rarities were supposed to have been randomly distributed to post offices nationwide, yet a suspiciously high number of the upright Jenny invert sheets discovered have come from the fulfillment center in Kansas City. Then there was the giveaway. If they had been randomly distributed, how could there be any to give away? There is something in the woodpile...

    Nov 05, 2015
  • anon

    This was plain fraud by the USPS. They should be made to take the Upright Jenny Panes back and give the equal amount back in Forever stamps to the purchaser. Refunds should be given regardless of whether the package was opened or not.

    Oct 23, 2015
  • anon

    I agree with dave stein's reply in August. "reprint the stamps like the dag h stamp as this stamp will never be accepted as being legitimate and considered a scam stamp. the usps should make upright copies immediately or stamp collecting will be considered a joke." It is not the business of the USPS to intentionally create rarities. These fake stamps will be purchased by dealers and resold at exorbitant prices. This policy should stop immediately. Lynn Dievendorf

    Oct 04, 2015
  • anon

    I collect mostly foreign philatelic material, but I do collect new issue US stamps in sheet format, in coil format, postal cards and stationery, etc., all new issue items. When I heard about the jenny souvenir sheet I liked the idea, for what it was, not for what it was supposed to do - attract new collectors, etc. that is nonsense. Most people, almost all people outside the philatelic world have no idea about any items coming from the USPS, they couldn't tell you the price of a stamp if you paid them. That aside, I bought several, many sheets - two from each post office I found, specifically searching for the remote rural offices, many of these I had to travel to twice, they were only open 12 - 4, they could not open the safe to retrieve stamps, they could not figure out how to ring-up the sheets, they could not figure out the cost of the sheets, etc. I also bought several from Kansas City for a grand total of 102 sheets. I was not one of the lucky people to find a un-inverted sheet. The printing on the sheets was terrible at best, a very fast and sloppy job. The cost of $12 per sheet was also out of line, why not six .49 stamps - then more people would encounter them? Anyway, just another way to hit the collector. Then - the big kick in the pants - some sheets were given away to random buyers from the stamp cave, what, huh. Then we found out that the sheets were not REALLY mixed into the production, they were directed to LARGE volume areas, what, huh. How is this random? How is this fair? As it turns out, by my going to out-of-the-way offices I would have had a better chance running into Big Foot than finding one of the 100 sheets. In the end, another mess for the post office. What should they do? They should buy back EVERY sheet sold. I would be first in line to return my sheets. Has this turned me off to US stamp collecting? Well, as I have mentioned earlier I collect mostly foreign stamps, but this along with the declining service when trying to purchase stamps from Kansas City has helped make my decision easier. I end my new issue stamp collection with the finishing of the series; The Civil War, The War of 1812, and with the Viet Nam Medal of Honor winners. I will still purchase the stamps I need for shipping but that is all.

    Sep 30, 2015
  • anon

    I am a stamp collector, and have been on and off for 50 years. when I began to collect again in the early seventies I started a US collection with the intention of getting up to date and then staying up to date and working backwards with an aim of 1919, close to the birth year of both my parents. By the late 90's it became an impossible dream, not working backwards, just keeping up to date. I have been buying new US issues in an attempt to keep up, invariably I find there was some booklet variation or coil only issued in rolls of a thousand that I missed. I had just about given up altogether and along comes the upright jenny, that's the killer. My wife has a complete collection of Vatican right up to date. My main collection is Greece, while not complete it is 98% complete and up to date. The U.S. collection will probably go on Ebay, you can credit the jenny and the self stick stamps that have to be purchased in full sheets, the Harry Potter booklet, and all the other "stuff" issued to commemorate exactly what is anybody's guess, certainly not the achievements or history of the U.S. As for the upright jenny it should be printed in an unlimited quantity for anyone to buy, and of the 25 or so out there the owners should be reimbursed what they payed for it. You can take the money out of the pay or retirement accounts of those who dreamed up this violation of their own operating regulations.

    Sep 29, 2015
  • anon

    I have been collecting stamps for 63 years. I love collecting U.S. Airmails, especially the Jenny Stamps. When I first heard about the new Jenny $2 Souvenir Sheet I was thrilled. I was also thrilled to hear about the Un-Inverted Jenny. I spent more than $800 in the hunt for one. To learn that I spent the money searching for something that I would never find, because of the USPS deception, is unforgivable. Although I have lost my trust in USPS, I will continue to collect new issued stamps. I would like to see the USPS continue to print replica stamps using older style of design and printing, such as was used with the Jenny, only using Forever stamp prices and no intentionally made errors.

    Sep 28, 2015
  • anon

    Hi John. Thanks for taking the time to express your opinions. We've seen several trending comments on the face value of the stamps. We will consider trending comments for potential future audits in the philatelic area.

    Sep 29, 2015
  • anon

    Re: $2 Jenny I have collected stamps for over a half a century but have not had much interest in modern issues until the 2013 $2 Jenny. The commemoration of the original Inverted Jenny with the stamps and the Collectors Edition set made this a favorite of mine. I think the idea of 100 up-right panes randomly mixed in with the regular panes was a great idea which added much interest in the stamps. It was a shame the distribution was not carried out as advertised but when it comes to playing by the rules we all know the government is exempt. I know of persons, me included, who purchased thousands of the $2 Jenny stamps for one reason only - two try to get one of the un-verts. A good friend of mine paid well over $50,000 is the secondary market to acquire one of the right side up panes. It is unfortunate that the distribution was not entirely random but it would be a very bad idea to print more of the un-verts opening up another big can of worms. Hopefully lessons con be learned from this.

    Sep 19, 2015
  • anon

    The purpose of the Postal Service is to deliver mail. The fact that collectors created a market that creates a huge profit for the USPS based on the fact that the collectors will never use the stamps s incidental to the purposes o the USPS. For the USPS to create rarities for the sole purpose of driving up values and enriching certain collectors is not only against USPS rules, it is immoral. I would add to the comments of Mr. Wayne Chen, also. His idea of limited time offers is sound, but only if the stamps are available in sufficient quantities for every post office to be able to offer them. I have been disappointed on several occasions that my local post office did not even have regular issue stamps.

    Sep 19, 2015
  • anon

    The Postal Board of Directors have made a series of decisions which have had a strong adverse effect on the stamp collecting community. First, and by far , is the deliberate printing and sale of non-perferated stamps. By not offering these stamps in the same price and quantity through the Post Offices or Stamp Fulfillment Center, prices have increased to such a point that many collectors have given up collecting. The decision to print stamps as unsoakable is another blow to the stamp collecting community. Now we have two recent decisions which are almost unbelievable.... Rare printings of the Circus stamp and the non-inverted Jenny should be sold to the public just as the Dag Hammearskjold was in 1962

    Sep 17, 2015
  • anon

    I am so disgusted with USPS for creating the Jenny error on purpose. Sadly you have lost a stamp collector.

    Sep 14, 2015
  • anon

    It's a sad commentary when the Postal Service seems to feel that they must create a rarity to spur sales. I nearly boycotted the issue and would definitely have had I known that the Postal service blatantly lied on at least two occasions regarding this issue. The "rarities" were not randomly inserted into the general run nor were all 100 "randomly inserted into the general run" per admissions from Postal Service personnel. I am very aware that those who have obtained one of the rarities are holding their breath as to what should be done but I feel that with all the subterfuge by the Postal Service that even if it takes legislation there should be an equal amount of "unverted" airplane sheets printed. The action by the Postal Service was, from what I have read, against their own guidelines as well as illegal in the arbitrary dispensing some sheets to "regular patrons" of the mail order service. I also feel that those involved in both the creation of this rarity should be reprimanded at the very least, including our former PMG.

    Sep 13, 2015
  • anon

    Put me down in the column of people who disapprove of the "lucky raffle" contest for the right-side-up Jenny pane. As events have proven, there was too much room for corruption and favoritism at the discretion of postal employees as to who would receive the coveted prize and who wouldn't. One would have thought that the USPS had learned from the "Farley's Follies" scandal of the 1930's. The USPS makes enough mistakes just delivering the mail to the correct address without taking on the added burden of running a lottery. Do not repeat the mistakes of the past in future endeavors. Thank you!

    Sep 12, 2015
  • anon

    I am still pondering why the USPS did not educate the public about the availability of this $12.00 pane and that "errors" were seeded into the distribution when the Jenny panes were first issued? As far as I know, only the collecting community knew the story. The USPS is very professional and efficient in putting up new lobby signs, but nothing about this error among the regular issued panes in any lobby signage. The next step is to "correct" the stupid and unprofessional situations that are now public knowledge. I am referring to the information that has come out about how only major metropolitan areas were "seeded", how the folks in Kansas City have some errors set aside. How the folks at Kansas City gave away errors for no apparent reason. Do we really know if only 100 panes were produced? Finally, what will be an equitable and reasonable way to liquidate the remaining panes. Lottery? New "seeding" perhaps in Kansas City via mail sales for the panes? Hopefully the IG will be able to convince the USPS that they erred and something must be done to make everyone happy. Additionally, what are the consequences for those who were culpable in the decision to issue these "errors"? And what actions will be taken to make sure that the folks in Kansas City know that they were wrong in giving panes away.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    Hi Richard. The OIG made 3 recommendations to improve and strengthen philatelic initiatives. As an oversight agency, we will be monitoring the Postal Service's corrective actions. This blog is in response to the Office of Audit's report. The Office of Investigations handles appropriate disciplinary or legal actions that may be brought against individual employees.

    Sep 15, 2015
  • anon

    I think that is wrong to create a rare issue just to get people to buy the Jenny in hopes f obtaining the upright version. Then I find out from the stamp paper that they were not widely distributed throughout the post office. I also dislike the delay in the mail where it took 2 days to get a letter first class from Apple Valley to Hesperia which are next to each other from the San Bernardino P&DC. Sincerely, Harold S Watson Jr

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    The comments I'm making are unrelated to topic. I just found this blog. I used to haul US Mail for Edwards Postal Service/ Mesa Mail Service( they are located in Lake Charles, La..I worked in San Angelo, Tx). I have unpaid wages owed to me totaling $30,000. I'm mad at the United States Post office for giving this company contracts. The USPS was aware that this company had not paid employees correctly before I worked for them. 6 years my case has been going thru the Dept of Labor. It must be nice to work for the USPS. It must be nice to work for the Dept of Labor. It must be nice to be a government employee with the pay/ benefits. Wow. After getting ripped off by this company - I'm mad more at the Federal Government for allowing it to happen and for it to go on for 6 years !!!! I have a family to provide for just like federal employees do. The difference is I get ripped off twice. Once by the company then by the federal government. Something shady is going on with contract bidding or giving out contracts. Again I'm trying to provide just like government families. Thanks a lot USPS !!!!!

    Sep 13, 2015
  • anon

    Hi Michael, Please file an online complaint at our Hotline page, available at uspsoig.gov. Thanks.

    Sep 14, 2015
  • anon

    The US Post Office are benefiting from Mail Fraud. Edwards Postal Service in Lake Charles, La keeps getting contract with the US Post Office despite the fact that their have been numerous documented cases of Edwards not paying their employees and being forced to pay by The Dept of Labor but yet the Edwards were still given more contracts. Also, I have confirmed with a Dept of Labor employee --Sal (he was handling my case) that -- yes technically the Edwards comitted "mail fraud" because the edwards were cashing checks that were only for drivers . The Edwards signature was on a form giving the criminal penalty for using the money for any other purpose except for the employees/ drivers that it was intended for. So, each and every check the Edwards cashed would have been --- Mail Fraud. The US Post office was the ones printing and mailing the checks. The US Post Office was benfiting from this transaction ( work being done by drivers--- me) and knowing I was complaining about not getting paid and doing nothing. The US Post Office was directly benefiting from mail fraud !!!! How ironic is that ?

    Jul 17, 2017
  • anon

    i think the usps should make the upright jenny available to everyone. and print more of them. just like they did with the Farleys in the 1930's and the Dag Hammarskjold stamp in 1962. any dealer stupid enough to pay 25k plus for the few sheets. deserves to suffer the consequences knowing that the usps goofed. or if the usps wants to make tons of cash. auction the remaining sheets to the highest bidder with a staring bid of what ever the latest dealer buy price is. or a raffle ala the legends of the west. you taint going to make all the peoples happy anyways.

    Sep 10, 2015
  • anon

    Thank you for taking the time to respond, William, and for offering your suggestions. We've received many suggestions for an additional printing and some type of auction. It's nice to hear what's on collector's minds.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    Compliments to the OIG for doing the Blog! I stopped regular collecting of US issues with the 1994 Legends of the West lottery. Take that as one person's response. Those who want a lottery take note. I object less to the 100 non-invert sheets and more to the lack of follow through on "random distribution" of the 100 sheets. OIG doesn't get it. Focused distribution of 70 sheets to the 50 top markets is not "random distribution." 30 sheets in KC is not "random distribution." 3 sheets at KC as gifts is not "random distribution". Linn's has reported 25 uninverted Jenny sheets, plus 30 sheets are in KC, thus 45 are somewhere. Yet half of Jenny sheets have have been sold. My local post office (Melbourne, Florida), with knowledgeable, friendly clerks, tried to get additional Jennys without success. More could have been sold at Post Offices before the definition of "random distribution" became known. I was at a stamp show in late July in Reno,NV. The USPS booth had Jennys. They were not selling. The best solution now is to withdraw the issue when scheduled and burn all remainders. The Dag H. story is not a positive one. You still get the reprinted errors in discount postage. Mention is made of Farley. The PMG at the time was chief of the Democratic Party. FDR as a collector got the first sheets (he was POTUS after all), Farley's family got the second (you can see them at the National Postal Museum in DC). The other imperf sheets were distributed as political favors. They are signed by FDR, Farley and other government leaders. That at least had a government/political purpose. Understand that some of the stamps were actually designed by FDR (again to be seen at the National Postal Museum). I have Whistler's Mother, FDR's sheet, designed by FDR, signed by FDR and Farley and dated six months before the Farley reprints. There is no purpose in the current situation. Like many others, soakable stamps would be good for the hobby. Hopefully what is decided by December 31st doesn't make a fiasco even worse. XXX

    Sep 10, 2015
  • anon

    Gordon, thank you for your comments. The OIG's intention with the blog is to engage the public and encourage conversation on important topics. As you have noted, some collectors are for a lottery and some, like you, are opposed to it. It's great to hear the voices from all levels.

    Sep 11, 2015
  • anon

    The limited edition 'Upright Jenny' pane was a wonderful idea. I am sure it led to lot of sales from people hoping to find one of the 100 panes that would not have otherwise spent $12.00 for six $2.00 stamps that they probably don't have a ready use for. When one knows that he/she has the chance to obtain something scarce and desirable, the thrill of the hunt is on. At our local stamp club show, we awarded one of the unopened panes every hour to a random show attendee. There was quite a bit of excitement over the drawings. Finally, you have to admit that this promotion has generated a lot of 'buzz' for the USPS and while some of it is negative, it does promote philately and the products from the USPS. I think the decision to print a limited number of 'Upright Jenny' panes is the kind of innovative thinking that will only help promote our great hobby. Congratulations.

    Sep 10, 2015

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