The debate about the Postal Service’s future is heating up and Pushing the Envelope is interested in your views. Last week the Senate Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services, and International Security held a hearing on the Future of the Postal Service. The week before there was a hearing in the House on the Postal Service’s financial crisis and future viability, and on April 12, the Government Accountability Office issued a report laying out the strategies and options to maintain the Postal Service’s viability. Some of the strategies under discussion include: • Ending Saturday delivery. • Reducing the size of the workforce. • Making postal employees pay the same share of health and life insurance premiums that other federal employees pay. • Generating revenue through new products. • Allowing the Postal Service more pricing freedom. • Restructuring the Postal Service’s network of mail processing facilities. • Moving retail services from Post Offices to alternative access options. [poll id="94"] One item that is generating a great deal of discussion is whether the large payments the Postal Service must make for retiree health benefits should be restructured. One option is to give back some of the excess pension funding and allow the Postal Service to use these funds for other purposes. In January, the Office of Inspector General for the Postal Service issued a report that found the Postal Service had been overcharged $75 billion for its pension obligations from 1971 to 2009 because of an inequitable method of calculating the size of those obligations. Adding to this inequity is the fact that the Postal Service is currently required to fund 100 percent of its retiree health and pension obligations. Very few in private industry do this, and the rest of the federal government’s pension funding level is only 41 percent. In addition, the OIG believes that the forecast of the Postal Service’s future retiree health care costs is too high. Fixing these issues could save the Postal Service $7 billion a year. What do you think? Which strategies will be most useful to the Postal Service? Should the mix of strategies include cutting delivery service?

 

This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).

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  • anon

    There are alot of really great strategies posted on this forum. The point is the popular concensus is that change is mandatory in order for the postal service to have a future. Change is not always comfortable and usually takes time to accept, not only by employees, but also the customer. However, it must occur and quickly. I have worked for USPS for over 22 years, and have seen many changes. Some for the better,some for worse. I can honestly say that I have been proud to work for this company, and it has offered an opportunity for me and others to make an honest living, provide for our families,and feel secure that we will have a retirement. Thats what we signed up for. We signed up for dedicating our life to a career, not a job. We stayed for the golden egg at the end of the journey. Otherwise, we would have pursued other careers. So all the consideration of forcing existing loyal employees to pay higher health and life insurance premiums is like saying, "OOPS,Sorry... we lied". Our forefather, Ben Franklin, would be scolding the federasl government. Franklin believed if we worked and dedicated our life to a company, we should reap the golden egg at retirement. However, the federal government didn't really expect retirees to live so long. Now, with our increase in life expectancy, change has to occur. So,USPS should cut the cord, and offer a more reasonable VERA package. If they expect senior employees to make a deal with the devil, USPS should bite the bullet and sweeten the pot. Not withstanding, the fact of our current economic crisis in this country,it makes the fear of leaving a career for uncertainty a no brainer.It is an insult to these emnployees to think they can't do the math. Fact: USPS needs voluntary early retirements. Fact: The VERA package needs major concessions,and it should be offered to more employees. Unfortunately, USPS can not continue to extend these past benefits to more recent and future hirees , but thats what they signed up for. That is what happened. They accepted a JOB offer without the trimmings, so these new hirees can not expect the golden egg, or a CAREER for that matter. This is not to be sqabbled over as this change is already in motion. Will it affect customer service? YES. As the old adage goes, "You get what you pay for." How can USPS expect the customer to accept increases in prices with decreases in customer service? Passing the burden on to the customer is a mistake. They should lower the prices, even if slightly, and this in turn will make us more competitive and increase customer satisfaction. It will be an insult to our customers if USPS thinks the customer can not do the math as well.

    Jan 28, 2011
  • anon

    I guess we should focus on the human resources work plan to work this out

    Jul 16, 2010
  • anon

    Joe R. I am not sure what country you live in, but here in America $10 an hour, we would all be living in poverty!!! I know cashiers at Best Buy that makes more than your suggestion for a Federal employee!! Think realistic!!!

    May 23, 2010
  • anon

    Go into the offices and talk to the employees who are at the retirement age and ask them what they need in order to retire. Some are not eligible because of the 5 year rule for insurance. Some need an incentive to pay off some bills. Some need don't need anything but to have their head examined. Find out from the people themselves, a personal touch goes a long way.

    May 22, 2010
  • anon

    None of the proposals talk about being over managed. When you send two managers into a different office in the district every day looking for stickers in the carriers case, it is too ridiculous to mention. Why can't the supervisor do this? One day in our office we had 2 of those checkers standing and shooting the bull with the P.M. and the supervisor. This is nuts, that's about $250,000 in saleries a year standing around screwing off and expecting the workers to work harder. Cut management not just retitle them, and you will get people to feel like doing more.

    May 22, 2010
  • anon

    First people should do there research and get there facts correct before they comment. Incorrect and misleading comments reduce the validity of their argument. That being said, 1.First class letter mail volume is not going to rise significantly and electronic forms of communication will continue to rise. With this trend of the public moving to electronic media there should be an increasing amount of online commerce. No one has invented a way to email an physical object at this point, so the Postal Service must concentrate on dominating the parcel market. 2. The Postal Service by law is required to deliver to every address. They should use this delivery network as selling point. Instead of looking for ways to contract out work to outside companies, the Postal Service should go to FEDEX and UPS and deliver there packages for them in areas that are not profitable for them. The Postal Service is having to go to those places anyway due to the requirements of the law. It would not cost us any more per say and if there were extra cost incurred it would be more than off set by the new revenue that is generated. It would be a win win of everyone. 3. Its not rocket science boys, remember what all successful coaches know. Concentrate on the basics!! Mail on target on time. Customer service,"The costumer is always right"

    May 21, 2010
  • anon

    The quickest way to turn around the postal system is to CUT postal rates for businesses. If your priority mail flat rate box cost is decreased to 5.95 and the small priority box to 3.95 you will immediately take a huge amount of business directly away from Fedex and UPS.

    May 18, 2010
  • anon

    Forget about Saturday delivery. Here are some cost saving ideas that would put us in the black quick: 1) Congress should get rid of the corrupt unions that teach us to milk the system and act like parasites on a dying host animal. At the very least, the Postal Service should negotiate more realistic terms to the contracts. The whole labor process is full of corruption and for the craft to pretend like all the problems are with management (or vice versa) shows some real ignorance and stupidity. Collective bargaining is KILLING the USPS because it can't do things that make sense to save itself. These contracts won't help any of us if the whole Postal Service goes under. 2) Implement USPS-wide random drug testing with a zero tolerance policy - I'll bet accident rates and Worker's Comp claims would drop like a rock if we got some of the zombies out of here. Seriously, why should drug use be tolerated in a government job environment? If you want to smoke or sell crack in your off time, go do it. Just get a job at McDonalds and not here. 3) Quit hiring felons and sex offenders. Is that all we can get for our salary and benefit money? We make a great salary, so can't we get people who don't molest children, sell dope, or beat their wives to work here? 4) Send managers to real management schools to teach them how to handle employees like human beings and not oxen. Most of our managers don't have a college degree in business, and instead manage by oppression, which could be from a lack of training.

    May 17, 2010
  • anon

    The PO can save a ton of money by eliminating the District Offices or at least most of the people that work there. There is way to much unnecessary paperwork that these people do. There is alot of money that they waste coming to our processing facility telling us how to do our jobs. They have motels, food, and transportation paid for. How useless is that? There are alot of ways to cut money spending at the top and not from our service areas. They need to cut supervisory positions down dramatically, including the 204B. We need clerks to provice service, not more supervision or management positions.

    May 15, 2010
  • anon

    Forget about closing small, distant "inefficient" brick-and-mortar offices - Congressman will NEVER let that happen in their districts. !!CUT COSTS!! A recent "The Week" Newsmagazine article put USPS pay/benefits costs at about 80% of the budget - WAY higher than "the competition" (FedEx, UPS,..) and almost ANY private-sector company. A 25% cut in labor costs would reduce the portion of the budget due labor costs to 60% (still high, but "competitive"), and the overall USPS budget by about 20% - BINGO, instantly out of "the red", without cutting customer service.

    May 08, 2010
  • anon

    Best way is to fired Potter.His salary alone will save USP right away Eliminate management position who are not physically handling mail Some carrier's management need to step down to deliver mail.They are too many.Anyway they were carrier before so they had an experience to deliver mail.As you look at the record,until now there's a lot of overtime to carriers because of long route. We need more carriers not too many supervisors.

    May 07, 2010
  • anon

    I think that you could raise a great deal of money and provide a real service to start-up businesses by allowing the Postmaster General of each post office to also serve as a Registered Agent. The Post Office would receive two fees from every business 1) for the mailbox which they would be required to have in order to use the PO as their RA in their state and 2) the RA fee itself. I have to pay two RA fees, one in Delaware and one in Virginia and for a solo person start-up paying an extra $100+ annually is a real pain. I could have used that money for any number of things because as a small start-up every extra penny helps. Mainly, it is annoying because I have never used the service: in other words, I have never received any mail from my Delaware agent except for their agent bill. Even paying $35-$50 for RA fees, excluding the mailbox costs) to the local Postmaster General would be better than paying it to a firm I will likely never use or need.

    May 06, 2010
  • anon

    The office of Office of Inspector General is the investigative arm of the USPS. Their job is the protection and sanctity of the U.S.Mail and the integral and honest operations within the USPS. They represent law enforcement of justice for America. To fight against corruption for the sake of honesty upholding Americans. It is a shame that they cannot be disconnected from the USPS to be a separate entity so as not to have to be accountable to top USPS management. So what am I talking about? Rampant theft and abuse of postal employees time, money and humane civilized living. Management across the country are constantly changing clock rings of employees cheating them out of time and money after all are out of sight and have left the post office to go home. They, on a daily basis violate and break the contract between craft employees repetitively over and over again costing millions of dollars to the financially strapped USPS. They put employees through daily totally inhumane abusive harassment trying to either make them quit, say or do something that will get them fired or cause them to cut many corners, many unsafely, or do things off the clock all saving the USPS time and money, which also counts towards a managers bonus, of which is another matter of great concern. Why should managers receive bonus money for a job that they are already being very well paid to do anyway. This also would dramatically change the financial situation for the post office. Shouldn’t everyone in a just, free America expect to be paid for doing their jobs? The craft employees go above and beyond the call of duty, in a stealth, cloak and dagger mode to ensure that the American people are provided the real, time honored, traditional, integral service that the American people have always known to receive. Management could care less. They care only for bonus money, and power and live in a state of cowardice all fearing their next higher level manager above them never questioning inhumane orders received to inhumanely abuse employees, which truly, and very sadly dramatically affects the employees families as well, causing a daily life of misery for them all. It has been recorded that the “Customer Connect “ program, which is a program that Letter Carriers use to go out to businesses to drum up more revenue for the post office of which they have drawn in millions of more dollars for the USPS, but some of these Carriers have been reamed because to do this takes time on the clock to win over the businesses to win this money, but the money won does not go directly for the managers bonus money, thus, the time counts against the managers bonus, thus, the they discipline the Carrier for this. Weigh 30 minutes of a Carriers time in say winning a monthly extra few thousand dollars or annual extra of a few million dollars verses a hundred or two dollars toward a managers bonus. So where is the actual concern of the manager? Their own pockets or USPS financial stability? Shed cowardice, firmly speak out against inhumane abuse, injustice and corruption as we as Americans have worked, fought, and died for, for a free honest living people and society.

    May 05, 2010
  • anon

    One way to save money in the Postal Service is to Eliminate the Districts, give the Areas just a few more people and have the POOM's report directly to the Areas. The Districts are useless and provide no support now anyway. At the same time offer 3 years Service to all Civil Service employees who will then have 30 years . Tell them to either take the offer or be converted to FERS and have to work longer. This will get rid of CSRS people and open up the spot for a Second Tier retirement system which you want and need anyway ,where the onus is on the employees to save for retirement. It also gets rid of all the Highest paid employees as well as gets all their Annual Leave and Sick leave off the books. It will not cost anything upfront like a $25000 buyout offer and will save billions in the long run. If their are any costs take it out of the 75billion that OPM should have. At the same time you just eliminated 74 Districts which would save a ton and would never be missed. Make the Areas earn their money.

    May 02, 2010
  • anon

    If we suspend Saturday delivery, we will be training our mailers to get along without us. This will just be the beginning of the end for the post office. The only unique thing that we have to offer is 6-day delivery. Instead of concentrating on cutting, let's increase revenue! How about charging an annual fee for city and rural delivery? Street delivery has increased in cost dramatically over the past few years but we continue to be forced to deliver for free. We could install cameras and card wipers in lobbies and allow people to purchase credit card-like keys to access their mail at any time of the day or night. We could be allowed to fax paperwork for a fee for the general public. We could sell a money order at one post office and have it printed at another office accross the country which would allow a low-cost way of sending money to friends, relatives, or clients. There are probably countless other ideas which would build the bottom line and allow us to forgo cutting delivery. Please help put a halt to the ruin of the Postal Service!

    May 02, 2010
  • anon

    Deliver the mail at night instead of during the day so your postal workers don't get Melanoma.

    May 02, 2010
  • anon

    It is obivous what needs to be done. Just like any other business the Post Office should cut expenses. I haven't had a pay raise in years, my benefits have been cut, and I don't get a Christmas bonus anymore. The Post Office is supposed to work for the people, so how can they expect to keep their high wages, and all the holidays that they get, for jobs that aren't high skill. I hate to see people get their wages and benefits cut, but they can't be paid more than the market can support. You are losing money, you have to make cuts.

    May 01, 2010
  • anon

    Here are some suggestions from one who does the work: 1) Start charging (.25?) for change of address cards and hold cards--and the service. We should become like a currency exchange--except charge cheaper prices. 2) We should sell cards, stationery, pens, in all office lobbies, and also online, and, in fact, we should go online with all our products and services. 3) We should become like England and issue driver's licenses at all post offices (and/or state i.d.s). 4) Any furniture, filing cabinets, cars, that are being disposed of or phased out should be offered for sale, first to employees, then to the general public. 5) We are known as the most top heavy organization in the country, so stop hiring supervisors--since the financial "crisis" our office has hired three, count 'em, three new supervisors, while the people who do the hard work are being replaced by TEs, who get no benefits whatsoever. Hire TE supervisors, or better yet, let the clerks, carriers, mail handlers manage themselves. 6) Donate all the UBBM merchandise that we throw away every day to shelters--maybe it wouldn't make any money, but the pr would be great and we wouldn't have to pay anyone to throw it away--they could pick it up.

    May 01, 2010
  • anon

    i am a city letter carrier. i estimate that in my office alone, we could eliminate 5 routes by converting park and loop delivery service into curbside. it would be a savings of $250,000 in salary. add in pension/health benefits, annual and sick leave and it's about $300,000. do this for 40 offices in pennsylvania and it's a savings of $12 million. i realize it would also cost money to notify customers of the change and to produce the mailboxes and install them for those that dont do it for themselves givent he choice, but the money could be borrowed from the overfunded pension fund and installed by our maintenace staff in 1-3 months. if this is done in all 50 states, the savings is approx. $6 billion dollars minus @ $20million nationwide for the conversion. imagine if more than 10,000 routes could be eliminated nationwide...the savings could jump to $10 billion and that is without cancelling saturday delivery!

    Apr 30, 2010
  • anon

    The answer to the financial problem in the USPS is absolutely simple: cancel all union contracts and institute equitable pay and benefits, not the excessive union scale nor the grossly engorged governmental benefit package. Of course retirement shouldn't be 100% USPS funded. Cut Saturday delivery as well.

    Apr 30, 2010
  • anon

    I hate to say that I really don't see what the USPS can do at this point. The technologically savvy folks out there, especially those of my generation and the generation slightly younger than myself (the much lauded 18-49 year olds) are turning to electronic bill paying in droves. The more you raise the rates of postage, the more inclined people are to go to free bill pay online. As it stands currently I mail absolutely NOTHING via USPS except at Christmas when we send our obligatory dozen or so Christmas cards. During most of the year, I do not buy stamps and if I have to send out any parcels, I stick to UPS or FedEx as they offer far better options and better insurance. And I know I'm not alone. My elderly mother, who turns 70 this June, has stopped mailing everything but cards now that I've shown her how to set up automatic electronic bill paying through her credit union. The more technology becomes entrenched in society the less relevant the USPS becomes. 44 cents to send a "Hi, how are you" letter, or free e-mail, Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn. The mail I receive? All junk. Catalogs from companies my wife and I have ordered stuff from online. The usual Tuesday and Wednesday circulars. Only one bill actually shows up via mail every month and it doesn't even need to as I already have a payment book for it and pay it in person at our bank. Most of these catalogs, the ones I can't opt-out of, at least, I won't be ordering from and they end up trashed or recycled. People like me are the reason the USPS is losing money, and why do I not use the USPS? Because it's a dying breed with your unionized excessive pay and benefits (which were taxpayer funded) and constant rate hikes. Delivery is untrustworthy and the employees I have had dealings with over lost mail, packages or rude letter carriers have been snide, full of snark and completely unhelpful. I'm STILL waiting for an apology from the local post office for the actions of their former letter carrier who A) pepper sprayed my dog while it was on a leash and not exhibiting ANY form of hostility and who B) drove his truck up into my yard on several occasions to drop off parcels instead of getting out at the curb and walking up the drive. But no, local post office here at 23606 defended his behavior and treated ME like a criminal. So if you expect me to be sympathetic about the USPS, a place where they have treated customers like crap for years, a place that has general reliability concerns, a place people often aspire to work for because they can get outrageous civil servant pay and benefits they wouldn't get in the non-government world, don't hold your breath. If the USPS goes under due to internet mail, online bill paying and other private enterprises, so be it. God bless Capitalism.

    Apr 30, 2010
  • anon

    With all of the options available to everyone now for receiving bills and other mail, the post office should be run more like the cable or phone company or like a utility. The more you use it the more you pay with a monthly access fee. Those of us that would like to receive all of our bills via email would not have to use the service. This would also force all the junk mail companies to pay their fair share and allow people to opt out of receiving all that junk mail......saving trees in the process.

    Apr 30, 2010
  • anon

    Solving the Pension issue is key to moving forward. Other suggfestions: 1. Pay more attention to the Direct Mail and Catalog industry. The ACMA has some great suggestions for increasing mail quantities. 2. The Summer Sale plan should be expanded. 3. Dropping Saturday delivery is something we can all adjust to. 4. There should be incentive for Prospecting direct mail.

    Apr 30, 2010
  • anon

    I suggest that you encourage those that have there mail delivered to get a box at the post office. This eliminates problems with keeping rural mail boxes cleared out with snow in the winter, or damaged by snow removal equipment. People parking in front of them or hitting them. And a security issue that anyone can take out mail keep it or go through it and get personal information and put it back without anyone knowing what has happened. I like my packages sent to the post office so if I can't get in I know it's not going to get stolen or wet from being left outside. Then keep the post office open longer staffed with two shifts so it could be open longer including Saturdays. A lot of money could be saved by eliminating as many rural routes as possible. Where I live people that have a rural route mail box will park in front of the post office and walk down to the cafe and have coffee???????????????????

    Apr 29, 2010
  • anon

    i have a great idea! More to come...

    Apr 29, 2010
  • anon

    its pretty basic--keep the people who do the work and fire the ones who are counting the years--months and minutes until retirement--the policy of can't fire because the useless have ben there a long time is not business-- proform of get fired

    Apr 29, 2010
  • anon

    The fact the the PO sends people around to check up on post offices to see if box up time is scanned, if every little chart is checked off, no sleepers in case, etc. should show where waste of money is. These people drive around to be little spies to catch someone in a slip-up and get paid salary and mileage to boot. Where is trust for the people the postal service hired? We pay some outside agency to mail test letters, pay huge bonus's to management if they can cut carriers, clerks, etc., and now they are asking for suggestions on how to save the postal service. Oops that brings to mind another comment. What happened to the US Postal "SERVICE" that really cared about serving their customers? Come on management it's time you own up to what's going on....

    Apr 29, 2010
  • anon

    To Dave And all others who commented on being able to pick up there mail on Saturdays They are only going to stop delivery on saturdays the post office will still be open to pick up or send somthing out

    Apr 29, 2010
  • anon

    Maybe the best way to cut cost would be to sell advertisement space on post office trucks. Many people see post office trucks driving around, and taxi, buses, and other transportation services already have at least some advertisement on them, due to circulation and frequency of exposure available. Selling ad space on post office trucks could generate enough revenue to offset the cost that the USPS is currently going through.

    Apr 29, 2010
  • anon

    I think that if it saves money, i guess its okay.

    Apr 29, 2010
  • anon

    If you really want to turn things around downsize management as much as you have cut the work force. Management has always been the biggest waste in the PO and they only worry about themselves and their own jobs. It's time to get serious and cut the waste if you want to save the PO

    Apr 29, 2010
  • anon

    The most overlooked of the strategies under discussion ... • Generating revenue through new products. Cutting Saturday delivery may work, but we can't cut the service, in fact we should increase services maybe even develop a 24/7 product or two that could be emailed and express delivered within any hour. Have temps deliver Priority on Saturdays and extend Express Mail back to seven days a week. Keep the POBox service and KIosk or window available Saturdays and ramp up collections and mail flows seven days a week. Faxes office to office, one day delivery $10-15 per page folded and delivered. ESpecial Delivery a 24/7 quick message $15-20 per page to the door. Maybe with above services Wednesday deliveries could be stopped as well; The carriers of the future might just work 4-10s.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    Have to add something here after reading a lot of comments. Yes we get health insurance, and we pay dearly for it, my premium is $250.00 per month. There are NO fully paid benefits, none. By the way, I do not know of any employer that does that in this century. We DO NOT have a $25 starting wage. USPS gets its moneys worth and then some out of us. We have taken a pay cut every year for that last four years, carriers that is, it is time for USPS to cut somewhere else. We do not purchase new postal jeeps every year, I am driving a 1991 postal truck, that if I am lucky, starts up tomorrow morning, it has plenty of 'character' in the form of scratches, dings, leaks and creaks. We do not have flat screen monitors in our supervisors office, we recycle rubber bands until they break. The big fat post office does not exist, most people have no idea exactly how much work goes into getting a letter from point 'A' to point 'B'. The most sensible thing we can do to save money on a very large scale with minimal impact to the 'vast majority' of the population is to eliminate Saturday delivery.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    I am totally in support of eliminating Saturday delivery, it is a no-brainer. Most businesses that rely heavily on mail are closed on Saturday. Most residential customers fit one of three catagories on Satudrays; they do not check their mail, they block their mailbox, and they think we already stopped Saturday delivery. The fact that rural routes have been severely devalued has caused most of us to have to work six days a week, I personally have been working six days a week for three years. The amount if mail I carry on Saturday is insignifcant, but the problems with scheduing subs to cover these Saturdays is a huge problem. USPS could save an immense amount of money in fuel and wages, plus restore morale to hundreds of thousands of employees. Let's do it next week!!!

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    Dropping Saturday service is flat wrong. There are too many people who work that need to pick up their mail on Saturdays. If you want to eliminate a day take out another day (Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday). Even some of your own postal workers say that Saturday is a catch up day for them. For residents that are working (the majority of us) that can't get to the post office during the week we need to be able to get the mail on Saturday. If we all had to get our mail at lunch time during the week it would never work. There are too many people trying to get their mail at the same time and not enough mail clerks available. There are a lot of good suggestions here on this site. Use some of them. Eliminating Saturday delivery is not the answer. You will need to do way more than that to fix this situation. By the way - a few months back, maybe even last year when the idea of eliminating one day of mail service came up it was thrown out there and it was said that it wouldn't neccessarily be Saturday that was eliminated. Now that is the only day being discussed. Pick a different day and not Monday!!!! I am sure that there is a day during the week that averages the least amount of mail volume. If so let us know which day that is. That really is the day that should be eliminated and if it happens to be Saturday well then that day just doesn't work for far too many people.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    Saturday is the only time I can go to the Post Office because I work all week. Closing on Saturday sends the message that the government is a failure. If the government has to make cutbacks...........................what is the general public supposed to think? No confidence at all in the government right now!

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    Offer early outs with cash incentives to those employees near retirement age. Then start giving the remainder of employees an extra block or two to their routes. This would save the Postal Service billions of dollars. Besides a lot of these older postal workers have been with the postal service 20+ years and have had a lot of wear and tear on the bodies. I believe this was offered a year or two ago but without the cash incentive. Add the cash incentive and you would have some takers. This is what is being done at other institutions to scale back on employees in order to save money.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    has no one thought of doing away with door to door walking routes??? what a huge waste of time!!! I deliver almost 1200 mounted deliveries in the time it takes to deliver 4 or 500 walking ones! Also, if we didn't have the weekly "garbage" (Red Plum or whatever everyone else calls them) I could probably deliver more stops EVERY day. And maybe they could quit wasting money for automatic flat sorting machines, we don't get enough of them to matter anymore. Let carriers find the most time effective way to deliver, I've been doing this for 30 years--do you think I like fumbling around with my DPS on the business section of my route? I works fine on the residential... One more thing--everybody is whining about catalogs--they are easy to handle--charge more for POSTCARDS, they are the second worst thing to handle in the mail system (2nd to Red Plum!!)

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    I think it`s time to get rid of these contract companies doing EXFC and Mystery Shopper.This can be done in office saying millons.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    The postal services should offer a good incentive buy-out package to its older employees in order to get some of the less productive employees who are making the most money and doing the less work an attractive incentive to retire.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    A New Business Model will Save the Post Office Significant Money "Thinking Outside the Mailbox" The Post Office partners with businesses where people go regularly (Dunkin Donuts, Starbucks, McDonalds). People may sign up to pick up their mail at one of these locations (Of course, this service is optional; people can still opt for home delivery.) People then go through the drive-through to pick up their daily coffee and their mail on their way to work. The Post Office will simply have to deliver the mail in larger quantities to these various establishments instead of individually to these people's homes. A postal worker who no longer has a route will be assigned to each participating business to hand out the mail. The businesses will make money through business partnerships with the Post Office and will have more loyal customers. As an incentive for customers to sign up for the service, participating businesses will offer a slight savings for their products (e.g., coffee) to participating customers. The Post Office will save money by significantly decreasing the number of home deliveries. By estimates of cups of coffee bought each day at these establishments (in the range of 20-25 million) and number of households in the US (approximately 114 million), we could reduce the home deliveries by about 20% without significantly decreasing the regularity of people receiving their mail.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    Raise the rates for "junk" mail: double or triple the rate!

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    I think they should charge all the junk mail companies a LOT more. I get more junk mail every week that I just throw in the recycling bin than I do regular mail. It would be a win / win. Catalog companies would send out less junk because it will cost more AND it will save trees and help the environment. I mean really, you can find anything on the internet these days! You don't need any of the junk mail you get. They have catalogs on line, coupons on line, store weekly flyers on line. If the postal carriers weren't having to sort and haul around all this junk that would save time and money too!

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    You'll love this... I'm a casual employee. (not by choice) I work at MVS and just got sent home early so my boss could save the Post office $13.12, which is 45 clicks of my hourly wage. Mind you this is the beginning of vacation season. At this rate of annual fiscal savings, you folks only have to do this 586,890,243 more times to save the $7.7 Billion you're losing this year. You call this management. You're running this place like the Russians ran Chernobyl.

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    Maybe it is time to go head to head with Fedex and UPS. USPS is a better, faster, and less expensive option. There is an illusion that it is not reliable. Automate, track, and improve this. Then do more business. Or sell off to one of these companies. Also charge more for the trash that is sent through the mail. Really.. who wants it?

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    My route is so large now that I have to use Saturday as a catch-up day, where I manage to get everything that has been curtailed all week delivered with help of carriers whose routes have undertime on Saturday due to their closed businesses. What will I do with all the mail if we are closed on Saturday?!

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    The post office cannot compete with UPS or FedEx. Last time I had a box shipped through them they "lost" it for an entire week. They have no tracking system in place and if they actually follow the rules that were described to my when my box was lost they could have told me exactly where it went and what went wrong. I refuse to use them whenever possible because of all the problems they have caused. I have had my mail stolen by my mail carrier and even with proof they just brush it all under a rug.

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    City Carriers are not salaried we get paid an hourly wage. We Currently have rotating days off and sunday so eliminating saturday is still the number of days worked. There would be layoffs. Part Of the problem I see is management. WE average 1 supervisor for every 9 employees, ups has 1 for every 72!

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    For years we have been over managed, giving less service, and the main focus has been on stupid stuff instead of getting more buisness and more personal to the public. We need to act like we really want their buisness, instead of putting all of these stupid restrictions on them. Quit acting like the employees are stupid, let us do our job. Also I am sure you could get several to retire if you would make it so they can retire with their health insurance. Do away with the 5 year mandate. No one will reire without health insurance.

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    I have a response to one of the comments that were previously posted. They said to cut back on the wages of the employees because they would be being paid for Saturday but would have a day off? That is mostly incorrect, most of the employees that work on Saturday aren't being paid full time wages. Most Saturday employees are considered part time and are paid hourly wages, part time postal employees don't make nearly enough to save the postal service that much money but cutting Saturday delivery.

    Apr 27, 2010

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