[dropcap style="font-size: 60px; color: #9b9b9b;"]L[/dropcap]ast Thursday the Postal Regulatory Commission (PRC) issued its advisory opinion on the U. S. Postal Service’s proposal to switch to five-day delivery. Following a year-long analysis, the PRC voiced concerns with the request, questioning the potential savings, the impact on service, and the effect on communities, especially in rural areas. However, the Commission was unable to reach a consensus and did not issue an opinion to endorse or reject the proposal to cut Saturday delivery.

The Postal Service responded with a statement from the Postmaster General, reiterating that five-day delivery is a core element of the Postal Service’s strategy for the future. The statement also said the Postal Service will continue to press its case before Congress, which has the authority to change delivery requirements.

Do you think the Postal Service has a case for five-day delivery? Although 5-day delivery is a key element of the Postal Service's future plans, there are many other options under consideration at this point in time. In your mind, what do you think are the most important options? Give your comments below.

Note: The U.S. Governement Accountability office just released its own report on 5-day delivery.

This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).

   

Comments (57)

The most direct way to report fraud, waste, misconduct within the Postal Service is via our Hotline form

Leave a comment

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.
  • anon

    STOP SATURDAY MAIL. IT IS THE SURVIVAL OF THE UPSP

    Nov 10, 2013
  • anon

    Why don't they just go to one day a week If you need something faster call fedex or ups. That would save lots of money. I lived in the boonies in Alaska and we got mail only 1 day a week by plane. If the weather was bad, we just had to wait another week. We still lived. I think one day a week is more than enough.

    Aug 05, 2012
  • anon
    Viper

    Titus is correct. I'm done casing a Rural Route within an hour and done delivering in 3 hours on Saturday. Tuesdays following holidays I'm only adding maybe 30 minutes to a full day. It would be even lower on Mondays following no Saturday delivery because I wont be taking the Advos ( Red Plum, ads,Papers,or whatever you want to call them), out until Tuesday. I could see a reason to add Saturdays back in the mix during Christmas season or possibly during a general election. Most that are oppose to the 5 day seem to be more worried working a little harder one day a week. We are not doing medical surgery, arresting a felon, or carrying a ruck sack in the Mountains of Afghanistan. This job isn't that difficult... We are putting paper in a box.

    Mar 01, 2012
  • anon

    5-day delivery is so 1980s. If the Postmaster General is ONLY pushing for 5-day delivery, he should be fired. How about 3-day delivery - Mon/Wed/Fri. The physical post offices can be open for business 6 days per week, but physical mail delivery by carrier should be reduced to 3 days per week. What do the carriers do the balance of the week? Work in the physical post office of course. You'll likely save 50% of your fuel costs and a whole lot of personnel costs. Boo Hoo, no more 6-day delivery...get over it.

    Nov 15, 2011
  • anon

    All you really know is your station isn't it? 6 day delivery stopped making sence five years ago. The GPS movements in your vehicle the on board cameras on test vehicles and mail volume have proven beyond a doubt what a carriers day is like on a Saturday. Even after a holiday nationwide a supervisor is spending an average of only "1" additional hour of pay to catch up for the "8" hours of missed delivery the day before. We ate broke, don't get me wrong I am a proud NALC card carrying member, but also am realistic. Saturday mail delivery is an absolute waste of postal recourses. Polls have showed that most members of management, craft employees and most importantly postal customers stand behind removing a sixth day of delivery.

    Oct 12, 2011
  • anon

    One thing I don’t understand is how someone that has no idea how the postal service operates can even comment on what the postal service needs to do to fix its budget woes? Now with that said take it from someone who knows what they are talking about> why would you want to stop mail delivery for 1 day per week when this is what it will do for the postal service> All of the offices would continue to be open on the days that just the delivery personal will be off> This would mean that most if not all of the substitute carriers would loose their jobs which could add a profit to the budget, but then that means that since the delivery or mail carrier which gets paid by the amount of work he carriers(not an hourly wage base) with the offices remaining open and the mail trucks/plants and such still running , The mail delivery person would be delivering the mail that was supposed to be delivered on the day he or she was forced to be off on the next day along with the mail for that day also, which means he or she will be delivering two days or being forced to do two days of work in the next day he is allowed to work. And I am quite sure he or she will be expected to do this double day of work with the same pay as one. Now with that said if you pay that delivery person by the work he or she is doing (which is how they are suppose to be paid) You will have to pay them for the extra days worth of mail which will wouldn’t be much of a saving at all (maybe a little for equipment allowance would be all you would save). Also lets say that you stop a day of delivery and keep the offices open which is what the postal service is wanting to do and you force the delivery person to do this extra day of work for free> then that would mean the budget for each office would save quite a bit> then as you probably don’t know is that the supervisors/managements pay and bonuses are based on the profit margin for that office so then most of the saved money would go to extra pay for the supervisors/managers and such since the profit for that office would increase. So where is the savings? This proposal just want work unless you put a pay lock on the overhead at the same time you stop mail delivery and also you should close all operations on that day. Now with all that said why should just the delivery personal be the ones to take the majority of the cut in salary for the entire postal service and the rest of the employees pay continue as normal or even at an increase? And might I add that as the mail volume has decreased over the past years the mail delivery personal pay has already been cut with the decrease in mail volume (they get paid by the work they do not an hourly rate) and be rest assured as the mail has decreased so has their pay been adjusted already. And that is probably something else you don’t know the postal service has and is continuing to adjust the pay for their delivery personal as the mail volume changes. So now I ask you this question where or what is the postal service savings going to be by stopping mail/parcel delivery on any day of the week? Also what has the postal service done with the pay they have already taken from the mail delivery personal over the past years as the mail volume has decreased? I know the answer; let’s see if you can figure it out?

    Sep 26, 2011
  • anon

    If the USPS wants to keep any level of self sufficiency, then they are going to have to go to a 5 day schedule and work smarter and more efficiently.

    Aug 24, 2011
  • anon

    I agree with 5 day delivery but think the biggest savings would come from eliminating door to door delivery. Can you imagine how much the postal service would save on labor, dog bites, & injuries? There's nothing wrong with cluster boxes. I believe more mail would be secure with these locking boxes anyway. Should have been done long ago. Has there ever been a public vote on it?

    Aug 23, 2011
  • anon

    Come to Chicago and check out how the majority of these have already had a crowbar put to them to get at whats inside.

    Oct 12, 2011
  • anon

    I'm a city carrier and I must say that this one of the most mismanaged, excess spending organizations in America and the profits show. I work with some of the laziest, most overpaid bums in history. Most hide behind seniority and the post union and it's doing nothing but killing the organization. Meanwhile temporary employees that get much less and can be let go at a moments notice carry most of load. 5 day delivery is a smokescreen for a deeper issue.

    Aug 07, 2011
  • anon

    If we go to 5-day delivery, Wednesday & Sunday would make the most sense to not have delivery. There are 5 federal holidays that fall on a Monday, sometimes 6-7 when New Year's, Independence, Veteran's & Christmas also falls on a Monday. On Monday the mail load tends to be heavy because there's no delivery on Sunday. If you have Saturday & Sunday off, that means mail will be overburdened for 3 days (Saturday, Sunday & Monday), so Tuesday will be a mother load of mail & a lot of people who are lazy will call in sick on Tuesday cause they don't want to deliver a heavy load.

    Jun 20, 2011
  • anon

    Lets focus upon determining if delivery hubs for self-service pickup rather than delivery points is the future for “affordable” universal mail service.

    May 13, 2011
  • anon

    I support a 5-day delivery. Most other businesses work Monday through Friday, why not Postal Service? I can live without my mail until Monday.

    Apr 26, 2011
  • anon

    Yes, I agree that the postal service must go to 5-day delivery at this time. 5 years ago almost every customer on my route was receiving first class mail each and every day. Today it seems like 40% of my customers are not receiving first class mail on any given day. And there are lots of boxes that I drive by completely because they have no mail at all what so ever. In other words. The majority of my customers are ALREADY on 5-day delivery (if not 4 day or 3 day delivery) meaning they only receive mail 5 days out of the week because the volume is so low. Wshould the postal service pay fuel and labor to drive/walk to each and every address in the nation when most people are not receiving first class mail (the important stuff) every day? I think the reduction in fuel costs alone would be very significant. Why not have a special service for Saturday delivery of parcels? (for those that must have their package delivered on Saturday). Have one or two carriers come in for the day and deliver just the special Saturday delivery? instead of paying the 100 + carriers in some stations to drive who knows how many miles.

    Apr 24, 2011
  • anon

    UPS is closed Saturday! I am sure USPS picks up business on Saturday because of it!. Often Saturday is only day I have to mail stuff.!! Stick with 6 day work week please! Melissa <a href="http://www.sleeppeacefully.net" rel="nofollow">keetsa</a>

    Apr 12, 2011
  • anon

    The issue is not about 5-day vs. 6-day delivery, but about creating a smarter, more cost-efficient, delivery model that services a destination point only if it respects service commitments AND covers its costs (e.g., it accumulates enough mail to make each and every delivery profitable to the Postal Service). In other words, envision a day when mail delivery is organized, not by carrier routes, but by a grid of destination points shared by multiple letter carriers. Servicing the grid would only be performed if economically justifiable (and if service commitments require it). When this day comes, delivery would occur on an as-necessary basis and would no longer be tributary of days of delivery per week. This is becoming increasingly necessary and feasible because: - there is more Standard mail to deliver than there is First Class mail to deliver - thus, we must accumulate more mail before delivering it (because the margins/contributions of Std Mail are lower than those of FCM). The slack built into Std Mail's service standards could be used to that advantage. - the IMB brings the 'intelligence' required to modulate the flows of mail between Plants and Delivery. The plants must, however, learn to hold their mail, prioritize it, etc. Mail inventory should no longer be perceived as a plan failure, but a concerted decision to help manage the 'destination point economics' - mail sorting schemes can be dynamically adapted to sort mail to a grid of destination points using multiple DBCSs as a 'single sorting system', rather than statically assigning a sort scheme/DBCS to a zone. No doubt that this is a longer term view, but one warranting further study.

    Apr 11, 2011
  • anon

    Most business offices that actually handle mail are closed on Saturday, regardless of whether their retail or service operations are open. I am a carrier, and my customers, mostly residential, that have commented, declare they don't care if they get mail on Saturday. Most of my businesses are completely closed on Saturdays. Overnight (Express Mail) will still run on Saturdays. Mail will still continue to transport on Saturday and will be available for handling and delivery Monday. It is a sacred cow, but so was cheap gas, care-free flying, etc. Times change, and so should we. As was mentioned, no one will "take over". Fed Ex and UPS basically don't run on Saturday,either, and they surely don't want the low/no profit business we do have.

    Apr 05, 2011
  • anon

    Come on now you have been losing money for years and have talked about 5 day delivery the last few years, do it. Stop talking and do it. People are not mailing as much with email and online bill pay, why do you keep wasting money and raising rates. You need to do what the Feds need to do and stop spending and run it like a business and cut back expenses to go along with the decrease in work.

    Apr 03, 2011
  • anon

    Five day delivery is not the answer to the current problems. The Postal Service needs to get legislative changes that would allow it to operate effectively. Five day delivery may be a good idea, but don't do it in an attempt to save the Postal Service.

    Mar 31, 2011
  • anon

    5 day delivery ? is a win, win , win for the postal service.. 30,000 workers that the postal service can let go. The saving is big. The gas saving is big. My postal customers tell me that they can do without Saturday delivery. Who needs junk mail on Saturday ? That is what they tell me. Most businesses are close on Saturday anyway.. UPS is close on Saturday, why not the Postal service ? 30,000 will lose their jobs, but we have to do it to save the postal service. If it was my business ? i would do it.

    Mar 30, 2011
  • anon

    Can't wait till 5 day delivery so the carriers will have a chance to take an early out offer. Those that wish to stay will have Saturdays off which I'm sure they will appreciate.

    Jun 12, 2011
  • anon

    I love the fact that the PRC takes a year to study this and then can't come to a consensus. Great job!

    Mar 30, 2011
  • anon

    The Postal Service's push for 5 Day delivery in efforts to carry out its constitutional mandate, providing affordable universal mail service to the American public, is misplaced in my opinion. More radical change to its delivery business model is needed, such as changing it from "FREE" door-to-door delivery service to fees for service AND free po box service at mini postal hubs (existing post office locations). The focal point should be determining if delivery hubs for self-service pickup rather than delivery points is the future for "affordable" universal mail service.

    Mar 30, 2011
  • anon

    I see the 5 day delivery plan to be a bit short-sighted, in the same basic rationale expressed by The Facts; however, I do not believe that he/she is correct in asserting it will never happen. All the statistics showing money saved vs. lost parcels = less hemorrhage by the Postal Service is not seeing the big picture. I would say that ideally one of the other parcel services would like to absorb our business, either in the same way that is happening overseas and taking over the Postal Service, or by simply taking over our business until we become obsolete. If Saturday mail is removed, the businesses that rely on that availability, like the pharmaceutical companies, are not going to just wait until Monday to send out their items, they are going to turn to someone who can distribute. Those other distributers will likely want to seize on this opportunity and advertise their ability and compete for low prices to attract those businesses full time rather than just one-day a week. At that point, it no longer matters that "if it fits it ships," because after a couple years of this, people will no longer be shipping, and the delays in the mail will cause more and more people to become disgruntled over standard mail thus leaving the USPS with very little to work with. Saturday mail will help keep USPS afloat long enough to become relevant again (FedEx and UPS are still running despite not having any standard mail business), but who knows maybe we are just "slow dancing in a burning room."

    Mar 30, 2011
  • anon

    i am tired of hearing they will use someone else if we cut saturday delivery. please, who else will deliver a letter for 44 cents across country. no one. so shut up

    Mar 29, 2011
  • anon

    Every plan that is tried falls short when it comes to big savings.Andf so will 5 day. But usps has to cut so i say go for ir or there will be a reduction in force.The new contract does not prvent a R I F.so 5 day may prevent a R I F.

    Mar 29, 2011
  • anon

    they will go back to meeting again for another year when they will issue the same report. which will be---maybe yes---maybe no

    Mar 29, 2011
  • anon

    the losses a inflated, by pre payments , do not belive fiveday would do anything but make things worse

    Mar 29, 2011
  • anon

    the facts is right, alot of you people are not lookin at the big picture

    Mar 29, 2011
  • anon

    there will be no five day delivery,because if you think about it prc agrees in the long run you will lose more and more bussiness the people that want there mail to hit on saturdays without delays will find other deliverly source to do this will futher be a death spiral to the postal sevice, cutting management should have been done a long time ago and is being done as we speak , cut the people that don,t touch the mail, cutting mail service will kill the postal service

    Mar 29, 2011
  • anon

    Most people don't care if they receive mail on Saturday. Quite often they are out of town anyway. From a maintenance and gas usage viewpoint, five day delivery would save the USPS a huge amount of money. It would also raise moral amongst letter carriers, for then they could all have Sat/Sun off. The only problems that I can see is the larger mail volume to be delivered on Mondays and the scheduling of subs to cover vacation and sick leave.

    May 16, 2011
  • anon

    Right or wrong, I see a five day delivery as inevitable. If the PMG and the board want it they are going to push hard for it and continue to push until they get it. This is something that Congress will pretend to be against and find all kinds of reasons to tell the public what a bad idea it is, and then they will go ahead and pass it. The cost savings should come from made changing the rules for FEHBP and contributions to CSRS and FERS. The next step would be to consolidate all the one man offices. Try and imagine if USPS consolidated one office per county in every state. How about pushing out all the extra supervisors and managers. That would be a large savings also.

    Apr 07, 2011
  • anon

    we must close on saturdays..no question...we will get back volume on our routes and have much better service..we should also give city carriers the choice of evaluated routes and put all boxes on the street..get rid of these walking routes..they are the most expensive service we have and should have been stopped 30 years ago...these things will give us back the post office

    Mar 31, 2011
  • anon

    5 day delivery should be allowed. Most doctor's offices are closed on Saturday. Most banks are closed on Saturday. The electric co is closed on Saturdays so what makes the USPS so what makes the Postal Service closing on Saturday so bad. Gas is steadily going up and look at the amount paid in gas and salaries on Saturday that could saved.

    Mar 29, 2011
  • anon

    you people have no idea and some of you carriers that post your comments should be fired, the facts are the post office is forced to pay pre payments that are unjust and that is the reason for the losses , you people that say three day s a week is fine me you need to re think your thinking here why it not you that matters the moms and pops that use the mail system is only 8 to 10 percent of revanue , it is the big bussinesses like walmart amazon and a lot of other that pay the bill at the usps. they want there mail to be delerered in a timely matter which incudes saturdays alot of th big retailers want there mail to hit on saturdays ,most of you people have no idea about the big picture !!!!!!!

    Mar 29, 2011
  • anon

    "Pay for Performance has destroyed the USPS. Instead of rewarding customer service, PFP rewards the slashing of numbers. (Must beat "SPLY"-same period last year). It results in a business attitude by management that is the exact opposite of any real for-profit business. Supervisors are LITERALLY giddy on a light mail volume day.(They'll "make their numbers!"). Likewise, they are miserable when mail volume is heavy. (Need to pay OT, late leaving). Here's a good analogy. Notice how ridiculous this sounds. We'll use a restaurant, "Jonny's Pizza" for comparison. A) "Hey Jonny, how's business today?" "It's a DISASTER! The place is full! There's a line out the door! I'LL HAVE TO PAY OVERTIME TODAY!!!" B) "Hey Jonny, how's it going today?" "GREAT! Look! The place is empty! I CAN SEND EVERYONE HOME EARLY TODAY! No overime. UNDERTIME!!! I'll beat "Same Period Last Year" today for sure!" See how ridiculous the USPS "Business Model" is? So with pizza sales down should Jonny raise rates and close down on Saturday? Or should Jonny run a "Buy 2-get one free" sale and expand his store hours? People, this isn't that hard to figure out.

    Mar 29, 2011
  • anon

    Of course we will see 5 Day delivery. Manye not right away. But the mail volume isn't projected to increase, and if it keep dropping, there will be no excuse NOT to go to 5 Days. Its funny in a pathetic sort of way........all of the politicians screaming for "smaller government", and "The Post Office should be run like a business", but every time the PO wants to change something, or streamline service, the politicians have to put in their 2 cents, and the whole matter goes into gridlock.

    Mar 29, 2011
  • anon

    Elimination of Saturday delivery is inevitable. On average, I deliver 3 trays of letters and a little over 1 tray of flats on Saturdays. The mail volume will continue to decrease as the older generation dies off and the "new digital generation" takes over. Ask your teenager if they ever mailed a letter or if they ever plan too.....

    Mar 29, 2011
  • anon

    Eliminate all Saturday service, retail and delivery. Offer civil service employees a realistic early retirement option.Pay all new employees Walmart wages and give them very little benefits.good luck getting anything valuable thru the mail. You get what you pay for.

    Mar 29, 2011
  • anon

    Medications, Netflix, Blockbuster and any packages that are delivered depend on speed. That speed is reduced with any disruption in service. Even if by another day. Throw Holidays in there, especially when talking about all the Monday ones, and no deliveries on Saturday are a real problem for a lot of people. Everyone talks about the letter they and bill they can wait an extra day on but what about those others I have mentioned. Look at the big picture. Also, the Postal Service is becoming more dependent on those packages and the speed with which they are delivered. To cut Saturday deliveries will only force some of these companies to find alternate means to get their packages delivered quicker. Companies like Fedex Ground who deliver on Saturdays will benefit from any change in Post Office policies. And the Postal Service will loose every more revenue causing a downward spiral. Service is part of the name of this institution and while they may need to get leaner elsewhere it should not be at the expense of the service they provide their customers.

    Mar 28, 2011
  • anon

    I will attention here!<a href="http://www.eveiskstores.com/" rel="nofollow"></a>

    Mar 28, 2011
  • anon

    This is the United States postal SERVICE. Reducing service, in a SERVICE INDUSTRY is a suicidal "business model." If you want to call us a "BUSINESS", who's goal is to make a profit. then say so! But what does a business do to generate more business? Do they reduce service? Do they close up shop for another day? No, they don't. They do the opposite. They make themselves more user-friendly. They put their products on sale.

    Mar 28, 2011
  • anon

    The reason why unions do not want five day delivery is because they would have less people paying union dues

    Mar 28, 2011
  • anon

    I also think eliminating Saturday delivery is a smart move, not only saving us money, but conserving fuel in these times of high gas prices. I know how much fuel I use and when I think of all the other rural routes across the nation, that is an awful lot of fuel being used for usually minimal amount of mail.

    Mar 28, 2011
  • anon

    I am all for going to Monday to Friday delivery if it makes the USPS stronger financially. Let's face it, the USPS is losing money hand over fist and it may just take a move such as this to make the Postal Service solvent.

    Mar 28, 2011
  • anon

    We need to go to 5 day.

    Mar 28, 2011
  • anon

    If 5 day would be good then 3 day would be great. Mon-Wed-Fri. delivery would suffice. Who would know the difference?

    Mar 28, 2011
  • anon

    There is no need to deliver mail 6 days a week. The volume just isn't there. Most city businesses have already cut back to 4 days a week. Either leaving early on Fridays or not coming in at all, yet here we (USPS) sit. Waiting for Congress to make up their minds. Yes, we would lose a lot of carriers, but I can see tremendous savings. Something needs to be done and when I talk to people, they all seem to be for it.

    Mar 28, 2011
  • anon

    If the American people only knew the amount of people on the payroll of the USPS that don't touch the mail. Layers upon layers upon layers of managers and support jobs. It is beyond ridiculous. If they are not gonna cut the fat now then when?? I bet they could eliminate 50,000 positions without affecting service and save 8 to 10 billion. Congress should force USPS to cut the fat. Then and only then talk about eliminating service.

    Mar 28, 2011
  • anon

    As a rural customer I would rather see them not deliver my mail on Saturday then to shut down our post office. We'll all adjust, I'll just have to make sure I order my medicine sooner.

    Mar 28, 2011

Pages