Public policy debates about solving the Postal Service’s financial crisis have largely focused on reducing costs by cutting service such as Saturday delivery, transitioning from brick and mortar post offices to alternative retail sales channels, or limiting other functions performed by the Postal Service. There has been less talk about the costs of meeting delivery service standards, which were reviewed following the passage of the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act of 2006.

Can the Postal Service relax some of its requirements to save money in transportation or processing costs? Right now, its goals are to deliver First-Class Mail in 1 to 3 days and Standard Mail in 3 to 10 days. A slight adjustment of these standards in particular areas might make it possible to save a great deal of costs. Instead of developing the goal first and trying to reach those levels, no matter how costly it is, maybe the Postal Service should closely analyze its infrastructure and develop goals that allow for reaching the greatest efficiencies.

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For example, if the service standards for bulk mail from Chicago to Los Angeles were given an additional day the Postal Service could avoid the expense of trucks and instead utilize economical rail transportation. A First-Class Mail package that currently travels by air could be carried by truck if given another day.

By relaxing service standards, the Postal Service can move further towards a hub and spoke network, which could result in substantial savings. Currently, plants may have lots of half-empty, smaller trucks fanning out to a multiplicity of plants only once or twice a day. Under this new strategy, many trucks would go to a mail consolidation facility, which consolidates the mail and ships it on larger, fuller trucks to the destination facilities throughout the day. This design has the additional benefits of network stability and is capable of scaling up or down with changing mail volume.

The bottom line is that the Postal Service and its stakeholders need to decide what service standards are worth the cost. The Postal Service should have an honest and informed discussion about the cost savings that it can pass on to the public by relaxing some of the present delivery service standards.

Do you think the Postal Service should adjust its delivery standards to cut its costs?

This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).

Comments (152)

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  • anon

    It really makes me mad to come home and find the postal service truck has driven in my yard and muddied my sidewalk, he needs to park the truck and get his lazy behind out and walk up to the mailbox. This is in Bellevue Ne and it doesn't do any good to complain to the post master I've gone down that road before, the general response from him is well, we're all human and make mistakes. Well I have news for him, I don't get paid over 20 bucks an hour to drive through peoples yards, It's a matter of walking 2 to 3 feet.

    Nov 22, 2013
  • anon

    I can understand why the postal service is having a hard time…it’s because THEY are apathetic, do not accept responsibility, are not accountable to anyone and lazy. Out of the last 60 packages (correctly address, correctly packed, correctly zip coded+4, there have been 32 problems (ranging from the parcels just disappear, to items damaged so bad that refunds have to be made to customers…oh the postal service does not return the items they damage even when tracking has been bought, to items delivered to an address NOT listed as the address of the recipient, to first class mail sitting in a sort center for three weeks before it moves to the next post office or sort center, to packages left on a doorstep in the pouring rain, to not updating tracking information. Once leaving my LOCAL poet office and going to the next destination, this is where the problems occur (between the next destination and the recipient). How poor can service get? Looking at my tracking and business issues with the post office, I guess they can get worse than the 50% fail rate they currently have with my business. I get emails back (no one will call and speak to me personally), weeks after a compalint form is filed AND, I get back the robotic form letter that the post office is not responsible (WHAT???, not responsible for their own service or the services people pay for?). I think the postal service needs to be privatized, taken out of government hands as the government is not doing a good job policing one of their won departments. Let’s see if this gets posted…probably not as theur want to keep the public in the dark as to how bad it is. If you are mailing an occasional letter, bill or parcel; there is a chance that you do not mail enought to see this. If you are a big biz then your bad service is reduced by the huge amount you mail…for the samll business person, the post office is deadly. I would use FEDEX, but the cost is way to high for me to beable to make a living. Privatize the postal service and run it like a corportation that fires people who cannot do their jobs correctly.

    Jan 25, 2013
  • anon

    The U.S. Postal Service is like apple pie and Fourth of July parades---an American tradition that needs to be preserved. Perhaps better use of technology will not only save jobs but improve services. It is an affirmation that the US continues to work despite the White House's efforts to bring the US economy to its knees. We like "paper mail." We take comfort in the sight of postal trucks and postal employees in our neighborhoods. Cut Congressional salaries, their fat benefits and retirement. That should pay the USPS deficits.

    Dec 13, 2011
  • anon

    ITS A SHAME THE USPS IS A GREAT COMPANY BUT THE PEOPLE THAT ARE IN MANGMENT ARE NOT VERY SMART CUSTOMER SERVICE IS NULL AND EGO IS A BIG PROBLEM HOW HARD CAN IT BE I KONW I COULD RUN THIS COMPANY WITH HIGH PROFIT MARGINS BUT UNTIL YOU LOOK AT THE REAL PROBLEM IT CANT BE FIXED I HAVE ONE QUESTION THAT I CANT GET AN ANSWER FOR THAT IS WHAT IS THE JOB DISCREPTION OF A POSTMASTER WHAT DO THEY DO BESIDES TALK ON PHONE. WASTE OF REVENUE BIG CHANGES NEEDED

    Aug 11, 2011
  • anon

    yup a service needs to be re-examined again and again untill we got it perfect .. regards. : : ) )()

    Jul 22, 2011
  • anon

    How about actually delivering it?-Or better yet, DELIVERING IT WITHOUT IT BEING DESTROYED?-OR NOT LYING ABOUT ATTEMPTED DELIVERIES? Start mass firings of mail carriers, and supervisors for horrific job performance, and replacing them with people that actually want to work? NO BUSINESS CAN SURVIVE WITH THIS KIND OF SERVICE. THE USPS IS A JOKE,A PUNCHLINE. I now refuse to do business with companies that ship USPS. The problem is the "take it and like it" attitude, nothing more. I suggest burger flipping, as it fits the attitude and abilities much closer. I was actually told by a mail carrier that you didn't care at all about your customers, not to bother contacting you, that the only recourse I had was to contact my Senator.

    Mar 05, 2011
  • anon

    they got x-rays right... please don't bother opening our gifts... if they don't the right equipment but with all attitudes then i think it's time for you guys to hire Benjie. you have to consider, day, time, parties involved, place of origin, destination......etc.. it's a long way guys

    Dec 07, 2010
  • anon

    How about changing residential delivery to 3 days a week? You could cut your delivery fees in half. Have two routes; M-W-F and T-TH-SAT. Each residential address will have a delivery based on routing. Business and Priority mail will have different routes with daily service. This is the age of electronic mail. Most people do not even check their mail box everyday. This is an ideal that needs to be voted on, there will be opposition, but I think it is a sensible ideal.

    Jul 19, 2010
  • anon

    Don't cut Saturday. Saturday delivery, at no extra charge, is the USPS primary service advantage over the $15 surcharge Saturday delivery ($15 on top of already highly inflates prices!) of FedEx and UPS. Getting rid of Saturday will take away all of your Saturday delivery customers, thus reducing post office revenues even further. This loss will negate what savings can be had from cutting Saturday. Instead, cut Tuesday and/or Thursday, except for holidays in which Monday, Wednesday, or Friday are off, in which case special Tuesday and/or Thursday service will substitute for the Monday, Wednesday, or Friday that is off because of the holiday. Tuesday and/or Thursday will not be missed as long as Monday, Wednesday, and Friday are still in the picture.

    May 28, 2010
  • anon

    This is partly driven by the expectation-raising effects of e-mail and other instant messaging services. And while sending a simple message containing text only, or text and basic graphics or images is now almost instantaneous, the speed at which a parcel can be transported will always be restricted by the prevailing conditions affecting the particular mode of transport used. Air and road services are now the favourite choices of express delivery service providers, as they provide a good combination of speed between major logistics hubs and outlying cities, towns and villages on the routes which radiate from them.

    May 18, 2010
  • anon

    Below are some thoughts/suggestions for reducing costs and increasing revenue: 1. Substantually reduce (i.e. close) the number of extremely low mail volume rural post offices. 2. Reduce the number of days of home and business delivery from the current 6-days per week to 4-days per week (eliminate Saturday, and Wednesday home and busines delievery) while maintaining overnight and package delivery Monday through Saturday. Reduce staffing and vehicle operations accordingly to save on labor and operating costs. 3. Reduce the amount of time it takes to deliver a first class letter from the current six to 10 days down 1 to 3 days. 4. Increase the hours of operation and number of active service windows at high volume post offices to reduce the long wait times and increase sales volume. For example, keep them open till 7pm on weekdays. 5. Contract out more services where possible including postal counter services, mail sorting, transportation, and delivery. 6. Set minimum performance criteria/targets that are continuously monitored and adhered to. Close or restaff and re organize post offices, sorting centers, and delivery services that are cronic violators of performance criteria. 7. Increase postal rates, for example, raise the cost of a first class letter postage to $0.50 for 1 ounce or less. 8. Utilize more energy efficient and lower operating cost postal vehicles. Continuously upgrade the vehicle fleet to better, more (fuel) efficient vehicles and more durable vehicles, even if it means purchasing from foreign suppliers, use of alternative fuels and consider use of vehicle fuels and technologies such as hybrids and diesels and use of small cars instead of trucks, especially for home and business delievery. 9. Stop supplying free packaging materials. 10. Take advantage of the stamp collector market and target sales of individual and sets of stamps targeted toward the the collector. Develop special stamp issues to the collector market by understanding what the collectors desire. Include many high value collector issues/sets. 11. Stop issuing forever stamp(s)

    May 16, 2010
  • anon

    I think you should cut mail out completely Mon & Sat. My mail man won't even deliver the mail if he has to lean too far out of his truck to put the letter in the mailbox. I delivered mail in the 70s and carried a bag, the mailman now won't even get out of their trucks and they are rude! This is an old system that will fall by the wayside because you fail to recognize that customer service is very important in this day and age. You are not the only show in town anymore.

    May 13, 2010
  • anon

    No Saturday delivery means to lay off employees. There's a lot of solutions if you will read all the comments.

    May 07, 2010
  • anon

    I think it would set a terrible precident to eliminate saturday delivery. Millions of people and businesses depend on the sixth day of delivery. Not only that but it would just allow UPS and Fedex to take over all saturday parcel deliveries. And who will deliver Netflix?

    May 06, 2010
  • anon

    Saturday delivery needs to stay. Too many people and Companies rely on the USPS to keep their business afloat and to keep privatization out of the workplace. The walking routes need to be stopped. Request that NBU's be placed in all walking neighborhoods to eliminate extra hazards, dogs, falls plus it would save the USPS thousands of man hours that could be used else where. The USPS could also advertise on the vehicles, change it monthly. Cut out upper management..too many chiefs. Why keep relying on the carrier to make sacrifices.

    May 06, 2010
  • anon

    Saturday delivery needs to stop; all mail should be at the curb.

    May 02, 2010
  • anon

    SUGGESTIONS 4 POSTAL SAVINGS: 1) Junk mail/bulk mail...charge same rate as first class postage and same for R.T.S. of "resident" mail. -increased revenues -decreased "bulk mail" -decreased sorting, processing,delivery man-hours -decreased weight and stops air and ground fuel savings -decreased waste in landfills-sanitation fuel savings -decreased demand for deforestation -decreased tire purchases, maintenance,etc. 2) Establish secure U.S.P.S. Bulk Mail site 3) Establish U.S.P.S. "coupon site" by zip and/or radius for local merchant sale/discount notices assuming newspaper and other print ad. revenues 4) Establish U.S.P.S. "classified ads" site for private enterprise and used U.S.P.S. equipment 5) Establish "closed system" money transfers assuming "Western Union" revenues 6) Follow UPS example, scheduling "right turn" routes and deliveries where practicable and practical GOOD LUCK !!!!

    May 01, 2010
  • anon

    Yes, eliminate Saturday mail delivery to save money. In fact, a better idea would be to privatize the mail. Sell it in whole or in part to FedEx or UPS. With the advent of email, text, and on-line bill pay, I have no use for the mail. The USPS was designed for a time hundreds of years ago when sending a letter was the only way of communicating across distance. It makes no sense in 2010.

    Apr 30, 2010
  • anon

    Cut out Monday delivery, post offices are closed on lots of Mondays anyway. Having Monday off would give employees the opportunity to go to the doctor, dentist, courthouse etc. and not take time off. There is not a lot of business that can be conducted on Saturday for a Postal employee.

    Apr 30, 2010
  • anon

    SF DESIGNS HAS A CURRENT PLAN IN THE PROCESS CONTACTING HIGH DIGNITARIES ETC TO ELIMINATE THE P.O. CURRENT PROBLEM INCREASING THE FOW OF MAIL DRAMATICALLY. OTHER AREAS THAT COULD USE IMPROVEMENT ARE OLDER EMPLOYEES NEED TO BE OFFERED EARLY RETIREMENT PACKAGES,LOWER RAISE PERCENTAGES BY 10-15%,CONSOLIDATE #POST OFFICES AND INSTALL SOLARPOWER TO CUT DOWN ON ELECTRICAL COST,NATURAL GAS VEHICLES OR ELECTRICAL WOULD CUT COST ON FUEL.DONT KILL SAT DELIVERIES.CUT DEAD WEIGHT AT THE TOP DONT CUT MORE JOBS THE ECONOMY IS BAD ENOUGH THINK ABOUT THE SNOWBALL EFFECT.SF DESIGNS AND(S.G.N.E.I)SOLID GOLD NEST EGG INVESTMENTS HAVE PLANS IN MOTION TO ELIMINATE THIS DISASTER BEFORE IT GETS OUT OF CONTROL.

    Apr 30, 2010
  • anon

    To Old Clerk, Stopping mail delivery will not overload or delay mail dervice. We're talking about no truck or carrier service here. The post Office and mailroom can continue working. I'm talking saving millions of dollars in gas. Have you seen the prices jump over .50 cents since February . Or do you plan on not eating in the near future. I'm getting hungry. For two people here in my household we really cut corners to keep our food bill under 80 bucks a week. I need the rest to get gas for work. We need to find a way to cut gas consumption and cutting mail delivery on Saturday is a huge step. Or How come they don't drive hybrids???

    Apr 29, 2010
  • anon

    No more Saturdays and possible cut one more day. We only need our junk mail delivered 3 or 4 days a week. Most of our bills are paid on line with "paperless" billing the way of the future. Cut back the days and save a tree.

    Apr 29, 2010
  • anon

    i think they should stop saturday deliveries.

    Apr 29, 2010
  • anon

    go to every other day delivery and close down remote post offices

    Apr 29, 2010
  • anon

    I have been a letter carrier for 23 years. I have seen the good, bad & ugly of the Postal Service's track record of important decisions. There have been some great changes over the years but also, and unfortunately more, bad ones. The elimination of Saturday deliveries is one of those catastrophic changes than CAN NOT happen. If the Postal Service decides to operate on a 5-day work week, it will be the beginning of the end. I realize there need to be changes made and I will outline my ideas to all of you who are willing to listen. I hear the customers questions and concerns on a daily basis, and I listen. There are tech savvy people who utilize the computer for all of their bills and correspondence, there are some customers will never use the internet or buy a computer, that is why the Postal Service will always be needed. We need to not only be there for them but to offer quality, cost effective service to others who are on the fence and could go either way. If the Postal Service continues to cut service and customer relations, they are also pushing those customers over to electronic competition. We continue to operate with old mentality. The Postal Service likes to use "scare" tactics or "end of the world" phrasing to get everyones attention. Well this battle cry is getting ALL THE WRONG attention. Let's first start off with a simple word change. Closings….People do not like change, and they certainly do not feel good about having things taken away. Instead let's focus on a simple catch phrase. CONSOLIDATE~COLLABORATE~COMMUNICATE~CONNECT CONSOLIDATION- Yes we need to consolidate. Our competitors operate with mainly ONE operating facility in a rather large area. I think if we look at areas we could consolidate 3 surrounding towns Post offices into one main hub. Right off the bat we cut down on rent,electricity,heating, basically all operating costs for 2 locations. Also from those locations we could eliminate the salaries of 2 Postmasters as well as some management. If you multiply that across America, that is a lot of savings! Will this go over well with local customers losing "their" Post Office, no! That is where steps two and three kick in. COLLABORATE- We need to offer, or have the ability to offer customers incentives. Look at Coke, Pepsi. They have simple Reward Programs that recognize people for using there product. Very simple concept, but it gives the customer a sense of connection with the product. Whether you set up a rewards program based on stamp usage or package mailings or simply contests or promotions to have people write letters in for a chance to win a prize. People LOVE FREE stuff. If you can generate stamp sales as well it is a bonus that works both ways. Customers like to feel like part of a company. If you move that company away it will a tough lose. That is where step three plays a VITAL role. COMMUNICATION- We nee to let the public know, WE WILL BE THERE FOR THEM. Let City Carriers sell stamps, carry priority boxes on the truck, be a supply office on wheels. Have clear directions printed up where to locate the nearest office. Have classes at the Post Office on how to navigate USPS.com. Explain to people that they can print shipping labels at home and have carriers pick up there items without ever leaving the house ( I have SO MANY customers I have to let know about all of these things) We need to get the word out about all the services we offer and then have classes on how to do it efficiently. Again, this helps us connect with the pubic. With all of these steps we will re-CONNECT with what is most important to us, our customers. Well that is an outline, a very rough outline, but I believe it gets the message out that, we are still necessary! We just need to stop pointing the finger at the carriers to save money and really look at the operations itself.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    Absolutely the service standards should be re-examined and more importantly, those standards should not be a part of any manager's merit increase. I am a Postmaster in the Alabama district and we chase our tails daily, wasting hundreds of dollars "just in case" that one late arriving letter "might be" an EXFC piece that is going to effect the district's NPA scores. One 44 cent letter might end up costing $200-$300 to deliver by the end of the day, once transportation and overtime costs are added. This happens EVERY day. Stop the madness. We could fix ourselves if crazy managers weren't out for a $$$$ for themselves.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    reduce workforce by early retirement offer to postmasters. Keep Saturday delivery. Clerks,pmrs, and carriers can move into the Postmaster slots at a decreased salary and possibly fewer or more flexible hours. Anyone age 50 with 20 years should be offered retirement.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    In summary my suggestion is as follows: •Identify current routes as Business, Residential or Combination. •Reconfigure the Combination routes into either Business or Residential. •While doing the above, send out notices and/or use the news to notify that: Business will continue to have delivery Monday through Friday (no Saturday) Residential will be in one of two cycles: o Monday-Wednesday-Friday or oTuesday-Thursday-Saturday Once this change is made, you should be able to reduce the number of mail carriers. Not by half but at least 25% since the daily stops has been reduced. Additionally this format should allow for further reductions in the Residential routing to two (2) days a week from three and increase back to three for seasonal activity.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    As a past (3) year TE Employee/Carrier; and my husband being employed with the US Postal Service for over 22+ years - its heart breaking to see and hear all the problems within; the USPS has been great to us and we use the mail system for all our mailings both mail and parcels. The biggest down fall for the USPS is the internet. It amazes me that people would rather pay their bills online and publicly release all their confidential information than to buy (20) stamps monthly for $8.80 and pay their bills and send things through the mail. What's even harder to swallow is when you hear all the carriers and clerks complain that their jobs are at risk and the larger majority of them will tell you they pay their bills online. The Post Office has many great resources, but advertising needs to be greater. And they need to promote their business within. Imagine if all the postal employees were to use the mail system for their own personal needs they could alone turn this around; they need to support their company. We are true Postal People; the USPS has never let us down and we will continue to support it and its employees. Buy stamps, mail your parcels, support and keep the USPS alive.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    Delivery time standards & number of post offices must be key in any considerations; it's sad but cost cutting in the postal service is inevitable due to the increased competition and less regular mail being sent due to email.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    There's lots of "freebies" to be had at any Post Office, in the form of some types of shipping boxes. I'm curious as to how much the Postal Service spends providing those items. How about charging for them? Even at a few cents over cost, at least the Post Office would get it's money back and have a small profit to show for it. I've personally used the items and would be willing to pay for them.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    I don't care when most of my packages get there as long as they get there. The delivery standard could easily be relaxed. Most people only use USPS bc it is cheap. If they wanted overnight confirmation the would use someone else. Another thought: letter carriers near a PO do NOT need a car. Let them walk the neighboorhood by the PO. No sense in wasting the gas or capital expense.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    how about the mail men take a pay cut to like $10 a hr. or use trucks that run on propane instead of gas, how about not having 3 post offices in one town and have just one? or get a private company to deliver the mail instead of the gov.

    Apr 28, 2010
  • anon

    I feel if you pay for a service like Priority Mail it should be delivered that way. Why should a person have to wait several days all day long just to get their mail. I feel that the letter carriers of NALC need to start delivering mail sooner. On average right now they get started on their route at 10:00 am. My former landlord was a L - 5 letter carrier. He left the post office he worked in no later than 7:30. He would be done by 2:30. This was in 1992. Now the postal service has these machine that sorts the mail in the order the carrier delivers them. Then why if the volume of mail is way down does it take so long for the carrier to deliver their mail? I think that making $1638.85 for a NALC worker is way too much to start out. Then you wonder why the postal service is how many billions in the red?

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    How's about making sure every stamp is canceled so people don't reuse stamps? I hear a few brag about the 'bonus'. It can add up to a sizable amount if you consider how many mail rooms there are in the private sector throughout the US.

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    Close some of the small rural offices . in some places there is 2 offices within one half mile and 3 in a 5 mile radius. by closing just one of these office that offer no delivery about $40,000 or more would be saved per year. I am sure this instance is all over the United States. Also you might try listening to your postmasters. They know a lot about the problems facing them and the future.

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    The Post Office faces many issues... from an aging workforce to a struggling economy to personnel who are overly secure and protected within their jobs. The issue of relaxing the service standards such as increasing SLAs for delivery will not solve the problem. This will lower the expectations of the current workforce - which they are already non-compliant with today's standards. In my experience (and I've worked in this industry), there are a few ways to improve upon and help solve the major issues. (1) Standards must be set and employees must be held accountable (including management). Incentives could be offered as part of the equation which must include both quality and production at various levels of the management chain and for individual performance; (2) To address the aging workforce issue, a reasonable retirement package should be offered. The cost could be offset simply be eliminating most of these high salaried positions. There is a lot of extra "weight" in the amount of staff at the post office, especially those who have worked there for decades with ever increasing salaries. I realize this may be unpopular due to the current ecomony and the desire to create new jobs. But there really isn't that much of a need compared to the amount of staff. (3) With (1) & (2) in place, the Post Office should not need to relax their SLAs, in fact, they should be able to provide even better service. Thereby becoming increasingly competitive, eventually resulting in more revenue (and for the consumer, slowing down the rate of postage increases).

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    Hey, Raise 1st class mailing rates to balance budget to keep Saturdays deliveries. Most depend upon six days review; to compressed to 5 days, a time usage effort overload. For our/your USPO employees and my staff and business contacts. NOTICE AND WARNING Alternatively, we'll use email and PDFs, video chat, free internet live streaming conferencing to handle six days a week communications. Legal documents by surface mail mandatory for federal jurisdiction over documents sent/received. You decide to, in fact, to radically reduce demand for surface mail, and lose even more demand. We pay and pay and go along with you. We'll pay more, yet you reduce services. Think again and raise rates 1st class mail to $0.75 per 1 oz to 3 oz, $0.20 thereafter, post cards stand size $0.50, and others rates set by a knowable collection of cost facts. Of course, proportional set by demand, usage of capital equipmewnt variables, ROI for USPO equipment. reply by email plz.

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    I am for having Saturday delivery stopped! I would love to have Saturdays off after all of these years but that isn't why I think they should cut stop delivery. It is because the mail volume is down and keeps dropping because it costs 44 cents to mail a letter! Even congress wanted the info sent to them via the internet which = FREE! Gas at $3.00 a gallon. Management buying 1 billion dollar machines to sort our flats so they can cut carrier jobs but have to hire people to run the billion machines. Our lightest day of mail is saturday and most bussiness are closed. They are the ones who generate 90% of our mail, they vote saturday.

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    the idea of changing the delivery standards for mail is only a clever ruse.. think about.. no saturday delivery means delayed mail on mon. and if theres a monday holiday then mail will be delayed on tues..duh..so... change the delivery standard to meet your needs without saturday delivery.. anyone who knows anything knows that they cant get the first class, second class and dailys out on monday now without ot... they cut so much that pivoting is a daily routine.. then factor in vacations.. etc.. believe me..it will be a mess.. any savings by not having saturday delivery will be chewed up with ot on mondays and tues...in the meantime they erode serice, force businesses and patrons to find another source for receiving mail on saturday. the closing of offices for retail service will be the next step...

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    The workers don't get bonuses yet supervisors all the way up to the PMG are still getting bonuses. Why was America so upset about the banks getting bailed out and still giving out bonuses yet we hear no angry cries about the Postal Service going broke but still giving bonuses?! If the mail volume has fallen back to what we had in 2000 then why do we have so many mangement positions? There are fewer employees to oversee so there should be fewer managers at all levels but especially at the very top.If you don't move the mail then you should have to justify your job.

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    Please before considering cutting Saturday mail delivery think about our elderly and Senior citizens who can not get out. Some of them have to depend on others, whom may not always be available on Saturday, to take them out and about for whatever reason. I speak for myself when I say I do not drive or even own a car and greatly appreciate that my local post office agrees to deliver all my packages, that won't fit through the mail slot, on Saturday. Now that's customer service! I also believe if you must cut back a day make it Tuesday and/or Wednesday. Anyday but Saturday.

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    I have mailed packages to Visalia,CA and it has taken 14 days to get there even though I send it first class mail. I have even "overnight" mailed a package with house keys in them from Escondido, CA to Phoenix, AZ and it never arrived there at all. In fact, they sent it to my return address in Tucson and it took 2 weeks to come home. I think the service of many of the employees leave quite a lot to be desired. They just decide not to work a day so they don't. The most important thing that needs to be fixed is the employees that you don't have work for have to come to work and sit in a closet so they aren't side tracked from them doing absolutely nothing. My husbands employer has changed the benefits and "full employment" policy that he was hired on with many times and we don't still get the same contractual benefits. You need to fire the people that are useless and lay off those that you don't have work for. Entitlement policies have long been gone in the private sector; It is time the Government jobs quit the same entitlement policies.

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    I"m glad to see alot of people on the same page of stopping Saturday delivery. Stopping Saturday delivery will not be a problem for most. I read an article that alot of private courier services went out of business. In cities and towns where there's alot of business needs, this would put these small businesses that provide courier service and those who ride bikes to deliver paperwork back to work. Hmmm Sounds like a little step for the economy. ( Jobs ) Saving millions on gas.... Not only that when I go to the post office thier always hiring subs to delivery our mail 16$ an hour, never out of work maybe no benefits, but what the heck, someone got to cover all the carriers while on vacation 4 weeks of the year. Maybe cutting Sat. delivery we won't need those subs, Money saved on no subs and paying for vacations at the same time. Oh! by the way subs are not screened with background checks to delivery your mail. Wonder why your mail is mixed up, watch your mail delivery driver, most likely won't be the same person daily if not weekly.

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    Keep the Saturday Delivery. Pick Tuesday to not deliver. The other modifications may help.

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    I think they should be closed on Monday, that will give them sunday and monday. if they stay open on Saturdays the post offices will pick up business. And having sun/mon off gives them time for family ,church and business! God Bless Postal Workers!

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    On almost a weekly basis a Management Team of anywhere from 2 to 10 people will show up in our office just to stand and watch us. Now thats cost effective.

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    Doing away with Saturday mail will upset a lot of people and increasing rates will not help, that's why people are using the post office less and less as it is.

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    It's really simple. The government has absolutely no business whatsoever trying to compete in the business world. Staggering incompetence combined with obscene costs associated with federal employees unions have guaranteed that every attempt the government makes to enter into the business world will be a colossal failure as evidenced by the Postal Service. The American people understand clearly that government intrusion into the business world will always smother, stifle and choke the ability of business to provide a product or service. It is therefore painfully obvious to everyone except the government employee that government involvement in business is nothing more than a poorly disguised entitlement program. We need to privatize the Postal Service and then, finger by finger, peel away the government claws of regulation that grasp and choke private business. Privatize, gentlemen, privatize - and then get out of the way of the professionals.

    Apr 27, 2010
  • anon

    Cut one day a week delivery of mail, cut upper management pay, cut employee pay, all employees pay part of health insurance coverage, reduce workforce, in subdivisions use central located mailbox system instead of each house having a mailbox,stop advertising

    Apr 27, 2010

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