It’s 7:30 am and you’re a letter carrier . . . so take a moment and imagine the following as a typical workday. First, you walk into the office, clock in, and check in with the boss. Then, you load up the vehicle with the mail that is already prepared for your route. Finally, at 7:45 am, you jump into the vehicle, drive off and begin delivering the mail. At no point are you required to manually sort mail. Is that day far off in the future . . . or, is it just around the corner?

Currently, Delivery Point Sequence (DPS) letters are automated to the delivery point so that the carrier can take it directly to the street. DPS mail is picked up by the carrier on the way to the vehicle and does not need additional manual sorting. The purpose of the DPS program is to reduce the amount of time carriers spend in the office manually sorting letters, thereby reducing cost and improving accuracy and speed of delivery. Since 1993, when DPS was introduced, the share of city delivery routes receiving DPS letters has grown to more than 99 percent and the share of rural routes has grown to 86 percent. On average, these routes receive 88 percent of their letters in DPS order. The Postal Service’s goal is to raise the DPS percentage to 95 percent by 2010. The chart below depicts how the share of DPS letters and manually sorted (cased) letters on city delivery routes has changed over time.

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Delivery is the Postal Service’s largest cost center accounting for more than 40 percent of expenses, and having carriers manually sort mail takes time and money. Carrier routes are configured to take eight hours to complete, and those eight hours include time spent in the office . . . primarily manually sorting mail, as well as time spent on the street. According to the Postal Service, over the last 15 years, it has recognized over $5 billion in savings due to DPS.

Now, the Postal Service wants to replicate for flats — large envelopes, magazines, and catalogs — what is done for letters by implementing the Flat Sequencing System (FSS). The FSS will sort flats into delivery point sequence. In FY 2007, the Postal Service processed 52 billion flats and 80 percent needed to be sorted manually in the office by the carrier. The plan is for FSS to reduce the amount of time carriers spend in the office manually sorting flat mail. Although FSS is not quite ready for primetime, the Postal Service is currently piloting it at the Dulles Processing and Distribution Center in Virginia.

If the majority of the mail is sorted in delivery point sequence using automation, it will dramatically change how a carrier spends his or her workday. Remember, you are the carrier and now you have automated sorted bundles of DPS letters and FSS mail. There was no need to manually sort any of this mail in the office. You only had to pick up the mail and maybe a few parcels before you headed out on your route. What does this mean? Well, for starters, because carriers begin delivering mail earlier, carriers have a longer day out on the street. In addition, more time dedicated to delivering the mail will likely result in carriers being back in the office within their allotted 8-hour tour, thereby reducing overtime and late deliveries. Further, avoiding the evening rush hour traffic may result in decreased auto accidents. Finally, because the mail is delivered more quickly, customer service may be improved.

What do you think? Do you think that the days of manually sorting mail in the office are coming to an end? It took 15 years to realize the impact of DPS; will it take longer for FSS? Will increased delivery points and decreased mail volume have an impact? Can you think of some other challenges and benefits that may be presented because of DPS and FSS?

This blog is hosted by the OIG's Delivery directorate.

Comments (81)

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  • anon

    It is amazing how everyone is ignoring the skyrocketing amount of ware and tare injuries among letter carriers as their routes are ever increased. What is the Post Office thinking? What is with the 'close your eyes and it will go away' mentality that is so prevalent at PMG headquarters. Letter Carriers were barely making it to retirement with functional joints and backs as it was and now the PMG thinks that adding a third more pack mule work to the carriers body is going to result in profit? I can see the class action suits coming a mile away. I really hope every letter carrier educates themselves on workers comp and federal disability benefits for when the time comes and it WILL come. Half the carriers at my station complain about tennis elbow and muscle cramps from having to hold multiple bundles in one arm just to satisfy the PMG's pathetic DPS fetish. I vow to spend my retirement years on these forums instilling a need to educate and share workers comp, DOL, OWCP, and federal disability knowledge with my brothers and sisters in craft. I know your pain and aches, i remember the absolute indifference to the injuries and complications that come from carrying multiple bundles while you do the stair master in the elements for entire decades of your lives. Again, please look up federal disability benefits. As federal employees, you cannot directly sue the Post Office, but you do get the Cadillac of workers comp packages. Always work with a knowledgable attorney who will help you with paperwork from day one. They are a lot cheaper than you think and a lot more affordable than going months without pay because the USPS has mastered the art of financially ruining their injured employees in order to pressure them back on the job regardless of injury. Lawyer up!!!

    Sep 15, 2016
  • anon

    It's amazing reading these comments from so many years ago. I am at a Long Island office and we just received FSS a few weeks ago, we have had DPS for years. This new system along with the fact that they do not allow us to case anything, has made my job, after 23 years, something that I don't necessarily enjoy each day. Customer service seems to have become a distant afterthought these days. in our office they want us back by 6 o'clock and if we can't finish they tell us to just bring the mail back. I have a business route and this is not just three bundles it's DPS, it's FSS, its raw mail, its outgoing mail, it's accountable's, and it's the mistakes that the DPS and FSS inevitably have in them. By the time that I get the mail together in my truck or in the hallways, the time that I've saved leaving the office early has been swallowed up... to me it's like taking your clothes and an empty suitcase to the airport and packing there. we are now about to go through route reconfiguration as they have eliminated three routes, just in time for the shorter days. That in conjunction with this new system should make for a very interesting winter....stay tuned.

    Aug 16, 2016
  • anon

    It's January 2016 and FSS is far from sight. I remember this pep talk from 1999. "A new era for the Postal Service, sequenced Flats" the fear of combining routes and in turn carrier lay offs. Well, rest easy carriers. It's 2016 and I still haven't seen any new sorting machines in the PEDC plants. We still have our job security and casing is here to stay.

    Jan 28, 2016
  • anon

    I've never carried fss sorted mail but common sense tells me more time on the street means more potential injuries. Less time in the office working together means less contact with fellow workers means less of a team feeling, just a bunch of individuals on their own. The payback on these monstrosities will be decades, if ever.

    Oct 16, 2012
  • anon

    well,fss saves time in the office,but, the post office did not consider the adding time on the street, having a 3rd bundle every day, takes longer, it is more dangerous, and that if you dont have to collide the flats in the office to avoid the 4 bundle. i have 28 years as a carrier, i see no benefits for the amount of money spend on this machines, if one day everything will be run as one bundle,with no casing, maybe..right now the political flats came all mix up on fss, they cant even handle that...

    Oct 15, 2012
  • anon

    I think this FSS has made the carriers job harder and more dangerous. Sitting in a hot truck or freezing in the winter because the heat does not work for many more hours than need to be. Sitting at mailboxes fingering through letters, flats, parcels and circulars and wasting lots of gas.

    Jun 08, 2012
  • anon

    thanks for the OT!!!!!!!!!! With a smile!

    Jun 06, 2012
  • anon

    My friend is a mail carrier of 28 yrs in Burbank, CA. She is beside herself with the workload this stupid new system has put upon her and all her fellow co workers. She is out on the street for 12 hrs, not 8!! AND her supervisor yells at her when she calls in and says she needs help on the route!!! She starts at 7:30 am, and is not home until 8:30 pm.....past her normal bedtime! Customers on the route are so upset that first, they trust her, have developed a mutual trust in seeing her all these years and not only is that gone, but now they are getting their mail hours later then they used to. That last bit doesn't matter as much as her whole life is turned upside down, she is no longer a kid, and says the union is totally worthless..as I've heard this for years. GET REAL YOU IGNORANT SUPERVISORS!! You are not making anything better for anyone....no less your stupid selves!!! This is not SAVING MONEY, IT'S COSTING EVERYONE MORE MONEY!!!

    May 01, 2011
  • anon

    wait till you meet core the computer program that will adjust your route to 8 hr it is joke

    Apr 03, 2011
  • anon

    Now it is March 2011.....Fast forward and the city carrier overtime is growing.....Hmm...could it be the extra time on the street trying to juggle DPD, FSS, boxholders, raw mail, sprs, parcels and.....now a new barcode which you only know will need a signature when you scan it at the customer...Now you are fumbling for a pink slip, it is raining/snowing/ windblowing and you wonder again who thinks up these lame brain schemes without ever asking the people who carry it out their opinion of these schemes? Doesn't anyone try to forsee the unintended consequences of their actions???

    Mar 14, 2011
  • anon

    This FSS is out of control. trying to finger flats from the bag is a out of control. i have to stop walking so i can see what im grabing or when i get to the house i have to stand there and finsh fingering my flats in my bag also my dps. im a ptf so i have been working in other offices that dont have it yet but so far i have worked with the fss 5 times on a full route and have not made it back easlier then 45mins late from normal street time. good luck everybody its going to be a long christmas

    Nov 05, 2010
  • anon

    I’ve been an employee for 22 years and have some of the same physical problems from working on machines all that time. Did you file for workers comp for any of them and did you have any problems getting them accepted ? Thanks

    Aug 15, 2010
  • anon

    Let's follow the logic. Less office time = more street time. More street time = more fuel expense. More street time = more chances to be rear ended, run over, etc. Is anyone looking at the big picture? Automation up stream may be useful but how does it affect the last cog in the system? The last cog is the human being who actually places the mail at the customer's location. The last cog IS the SERVICE in the postal system. That cog is now going to be required to have to pull product from more locations within their vehicle to perform their duties. This means longer waits at each stop on the route. This is fraught with danger for the safety of the last cog. It appears that the design of the system in no way considers the impact upon the last cogs. I can't even grasp how a walking route is supposed to "benefit" from this.

    Jul 17, 2010
  • anon

    Very simple DPS never been perfect why buying FSS... what a waste of money

    Jul 16, 2010
  • anon

    I challenge those people who believe on this machine to try to deliver mail with 3 bundles.It's easy to say but it's hard to do it. Sad to say but I hate my job especially of this 3 bundle system. Management treated you like a robot and no respect. If you are a good and fast worker they abused you.What's the point of being a good carrier if in the end they'll give you extra work.

    May 17, 2010
  • anon

    Now carriers delivering 3 bundles of mail (DPS, Flats, House to house mail) You know what may be you will save office time but not on street time. How many bundles of mail we will hold since this machines can't read everything?

    May 17, 2010
  • anon

    DPS is not perfect then you will add FSS....waste of money...more injuries

    May 17, 2010
  • anon

    Retiree with age + seniority = 50, with Fortune 500 Co. 13 yrs. ago. Opted to defer 1/2 income with total confidence that opportunities would present themselves and they did. The incentive - "higher level thinkers", best and brightest, determined that my enticement should be to pay off my house, send my kids to college (both serving in the medical field; one at Vanderbilt and the other a paramedic) and 100% major medical insurance coverage. USPS was in need of data management specialists to ramp-up the DPS environment and recognition software. Seems there were not enough "career employees" that were computer literate, nor could qualify even at an entry level. Therefore, this mission was outsourced through Lockheed Martin; you know the folks that build the fighter jets and satelites? Having come on board with USPS; through all of this, I've remained of the opinion that YES, MUCH CAN BE IMPROVED UPON in technological advancement. I will not even chalk it off to archaic mentality; but the consequences of inactions based upon "internal audit" and monitoring procedures (very biased) with just a monetary objective, or an attitude of "whatever makes me look good"; the successful business models in my past employment and present admiration; simply do not even give ear to such opinions. Imagine, your dream; usually location, location, location, and the love of your life sharing your future. Nothing owed, paid in full; what would you do? Children made good, no issues of rampant public assistance prevail (pretty sheltered before becoming carrier), and no enabling allowed. Well, I'll tell you what I did. Was never afraid to train, transfer, or be too proudful to serve in any job capacity with USPS; that only proved to expand my knowledge of operations, technology, and personnel exposure. However, this system only seeks to penalize employees that choose to be exposed to an array of employment opportunities within; unlike Fortune 500 companies and business models that elect to applaud and compensate the individual's intestinal fortitude. Our station mgrs. and PMs are not paid enough (in Corporate America standards), and are not of a work ethic to do more for the amount they are paid (with the exception of my current "assigned PM, B.M.(not a joke, really his initials)" does whatever it takes. But because he's exceptional in his tasks, he's been detailed all over kingdom-come since the retirement of J.G. and we've had a dozen or so want-a-be's. This is my personal observation. Therefore, now as a carrier (which I do so love; fresh air, sunshine, exercise, and customers that I adore) I am absolutely elated in anticipation of the "load and carry" future of USPS letter carriers. Remember, I was there at the cutting edge of burning- in the FSM100's (Carrier Routed trays) for Quality Assurance Committee at Headquarters (we failed some, we passed some) no bias, just factual. I truely love this approach; with no reflection upon personal interest in the process; only QUALITY. And, if I didn't love my life, location, and what I'm doing now; I'd probably transfer again to participate in the FSS trials and implementation. I do so love technology as it improves our lives daily. I know, a bit too forward thinking for most; but I cut my teeth back in the 70's with AT&T in the communications and information technology industry, and what a blessing. I would never have gained so much from recognizing the difference as an employee with profit-sharing benefits vs. USPS. Final word, bring it on - so encouraged by the hope of increased level of excellence in customer service and shedding of deadbeats off payroll.

    Dec 30, 2009
  • anon

    I have been a letter carrier for nearly twenty years now. We just started carrying mail in an FSS environment a couple of weeks ago. Zero training, zero discussion of how to carry the mail. It is obvious that postal management has decided to put their heads in the sand and act like FSS will add no time to the street. It adds 3-5 minutes per division and if you have a park and loop with 15 divisions you have an added 30-45 minutes per day on the street. You cannot pike mail out of you bag in between houses. I tried to carry a third bundle for a week and finally gave up. Now I just collate the residual mail with the FSS at the back of the vehicle. Management has shown no respect for the craft in dumping a new work method on us without any recognition or consideration of its effects. Unfortunately their failure will ultimately mean failure for the Postal Service. I am extremely disappointed, though not surprised by the performance of postal management.

    Nov 11, 2009
  • anon

    "DPS mail is picked up by the carrier on the way to the vehicle and does not need additional manual sorting. The purpose of the DPS program is to reduce the amount of time carriers spend in the office manually sorting letters, thereby reducing cost and improving accuracy and speed of delivery.".......that must not be a universal idea, heck in our office management allows culling of DPS(before routes are pulled down). Some carriers will finger every piece, removing the bad(sometimes upwards of a half hour),this practice has gone on for years. Don't even question 3rd bundle ads which are cased in by some the morning they go out. My point is with most posts so eager to belittle management, who's at fault here? Management for allowing it or the carriers who do it on their own accord. There was a time I really liked my job, but not when both parties are guilty in my book for not trying to insure the longevity of the postal service. My username says it all.

    Sep 23, 2009
  • anon

    "pick up a few parcels"? What about the spr's? My average parcel count per mgt is three a day. I can count the times I have had less than ten in a day because i kept copies of the days I was inspected. Any other day, 15 spr's and 10 that won't fit in a bag. Marriage mail and all it's droppings will foul things up. Will there still be third bundle flats? Anything postcard and smaller has to be sorted before the street cuz they don't sort well in the DPS, how many such issues will the FSS have? Mgt keeps coming up with new acronyms for the workers to ridicule!

    Sep 06, 2009
  • anon

    Carriers still have to case mail because they have to wait for parcels, letters unsorted by machine, and signature required items so carriers case machined mail while they wait. Machines are being paid for by cutting carrier pay because supposedly casing is not required. It'll be the same thing with FSS.

    Aug 23, 2009
  • anon

    The Postal Service can't deliver home town newspapers in a timely manner. I get none for days, then 3 at a time. This has been the case for years. How is $876,000,000 for a machine going to fix this? Money to sort an ever DECREASING flow of flats. Shaft the periodical mailers for efficiency in mailing Victoria's Secret catalogs. Find out how carriers work most efficiently and make the machines work that way. One bundle, and pull the vacant homes, moves and holds. Let the carrier have input into the system to register vacant homes, moves and holds. Allow carriers to view and modify the change of address system. Why keep the new addresses secret from the carriers? Once the forwarding time expired, how will customers get the once every other year vehicle registration, Greeting cards from distant friends and relatives, and that tax refund check? Good carriers look up the new address after the forwarding period expires and send those important things on. As the percentage of mail that is standard rate business mail increases, and first class diminishes, more and more people will stop checking their mailboxes. I have several now. I have to hold their mail 10 days before disposing of it, and start all over again. The Postal Service needs to find the right way to prepare mail for delivery, and that is single bundle. Carriers would sort residual mail, and insert it into the single bundle, maintaining the integrity of the single bundle. Management must concentrate on increasing parcel services. Flat rate boxes and click and ship are good starts. The volume needs to increase to compensate for the loss of first class volume.

    Aug 02, 2009
  • anon

    Is there any definitive source that helps us estimate our overtime based on DPS? For example, if my route was evaluated with an average of 2000 pieces of DPS and DOIS shows that I have 3000 pieces today, how much OT should I put in for, based on the fact that I have 1000 more pieces of DPS?

    Jul 28, 2009
  • anon

    Make your best guess, and fill out a PS form 3996. Call back as soon as you realize you are going over your estimate, if necessary. DPS makes no change in your notifying management of overtime.

    Aug 02, 2009
  • anon

    Sir, I basically have one question. Who will be able to carry/walk 7 hours a day for 30 years carrying a satchel full of mail/weight ( 20 lbs avg ) and make it to retirement ?

    Jul 27, 2009
  • anon

    i think FSS will greatly improve the po financially. management just needs to exercise care in the way they set up routes. the routes should be a good mixture of walking, mounted and jumps. if they are short sighted and continue with cores to try to save every last penny now, it will cost them a lot later in comp and sick leave. unfortunately, history says they will be short sighted.

    Jul 16, 2009
  • anon

    Ha ha ha....this person has a future in comedy. DPS has been a failure since it's inception and will get worse when flats are added to the equation. It is really amazing when you talk to the "old timers" and they tell you how they would start at 6:00 sort all oof their mail at the case, get out to the street and be back before 3:30. now with all of the "time saving" automation, most carriers are starting later, leaving later, and getting back at night later.. When DPS flats are in place, will we all getting back by 8pm?

    Jun 29, 2009
  • anon

    Got DPS as a rural carrier in Jan., 09. Have an LLV and love it. 35+ years with USPS. My beef--why is San Francisco plant running almost all carrier rt sort bundles of flats/magazines through the UFSM 100 machines? Trying to drive up numbers to keep their jobs? This is costing the USPS much money. And instead of being able to quickly case flats for delivery, I have to fight through helter-skelter helicopter flats. This borders on criminal activity, in the costs to the USPS. The Inspection Service should look into this. It's very disturbing to have to hand sort random sort Via Magazines that should have come in walking sort sequence. Heads should roll.

    Jun 21, 2009
  • anon

    am a fsm 100 clerk in a major installation (once the leading flat processing section in the nation) and since the AI and ATHS upgrades we can't even get certified. processing is down by 40% a compeletly compentent machine has been destroyed. and believe me i know flat processing and the FSS will be an even bigger failure. follow the money graft has to involed somewhere

    Jun 18, 2009
  • anon

    I am a letter carrier of over 22 years and I have just finished filling out the application for FERS early retirement (VER). I am nervous about taking this step as I am 54 and need to bridge the gap until I begin to receive the SSI supplemental at 56. Reading all your comments has helped me feel more at ease about this decision, I truly am sad to be leaving my route of 18 years but I have witnessed and experienced all that has been mentioned regarding the downfall of our service life via Management's folly. The USPS business model is unsound and there seems little that Postal Workers can do to effect a change in strategy. Frustration abounds. Asking carriers to just work harder, longer, faster, could be my 7 year old's business model. Even when management is shown by their own numbers how carriers can be more efficient working in safe but "unapproved" methods, they refuse to allow it. This has caused me/us to have ZERO faith in management's ability to guide us through these lean and changing times. I'll miss working with so many of my good brothers and sisters in mail, but it's time for me to go. Best of luck to you all, you DESERVE IT!

    Jun 18, 2009
  • anon

    i may be wrong, but i think to receive the ssi supplement you have to be minimum retirement age and 30 years in the post office. you may want to double check on this before you retire.

    Sep 06, 2009
  • anon

    Just because we now have sliced bread, packaged balogna,packaged cheese, and bottled condiments doesn't mean we should eleminate the kitchen. It does make it faster to have things in order in the kitchen. Let the cook put it together and service is swift. Make the cook take it to the table and look at each individual preference, it takes more time and is sloppy, as the delivery person tries to go faster, soon you will have egg all over the place. Try serving a banquet of 500 people, making each order at the table, the people at the end will never come back.

    Jun 16, 2009
  • anon

    When we first got DPS at our office our Postmaster let us case it in or do whatever we needed to do to make it work, our office was no. 1 in the District and the only office showing an improvement with DPS. Well when our Postmaster went to a meeting to be congratulated on why our office was no. 1 and why DPS was working out so well he explained he let us case it up or do whatever to make it work, needless to say his superiors were upset and told him we were not allowed to touch the DPS and we went from the top to the bottom, one of the worst, thanks for the overtime.

    Jun 15, 2009
  • anon

    These machines cost about $876,000,000 each.They need to expand buildings or build new ones so they fit.At the bulk mail center in Jersey city,NJ. they had to move the military mail to the L&dc In karney.They hired clerks and other personal to work the mail. ( they had excess clerks in other places they could have used.)(Now the USPS is trying to cut.)Three or four years later they still don't have a FSS working there.From what i have read they don't work too well.If it wasn't for the waste,mismanagement and stealing the Post Office would not be in the mess it's in now.

    Jun 12, 2009
  • anon

    I love this quote from the article: "You only had to pick up the mail and maybe a few parcels before you headed out on your route" HAHA!! A few parcels?? What about November and December. Will there be "just a few parcels" to work? Hell, Im still averaging 50-60 parcels a day. Seems more than a few! Its obvious, this author has no clue what actually happens on a daily basis for a carrier.

    Jun 12, 2009
  • anon

    If this is true about DPS, why now in Northern NJ, currently in our office now, carriers are being sent out after returning from their own routes at 4 - 5 PM, to deliver 1st class mail from their DPS that was intended for a different route. Meaning letters missorts in town by the DPS. Why instead of all this waste of gas, travel time at peak traffic flow hours and carrier time, not allow the carriers to take 15 minutes in the AM, case the DPS and pull all the NOV, forwards, and letters for other routes, give them to the proper route and end the mistakes right there in the morn. It would eliminate the 3M case at night, and the time spent in the morn casing the DPS would be offset by the loss of sorting time in the PM for the 3M.

    Jun 11, 2009
  • anon

    My residential DPS is fine. My business DPS is a nightmare. Most of my 78 business addresses have suite letters or numbers. So all number 20 letters are together but suites A, B, C, are all mixed. Taking it to the street this way would be a nightmare, so I sort it all.(BEFORE HITTING THE STREET) You can't sort this mail in the truck. If the Flats come this way Oh baby. I also agree with the person saying, Why buy all these FSS machines when you have 20 flats? Is that cost effective? duh!

    Jun 11, 2009
  • anon

    What about the Rural Carriers that are using their own vehicles to deliver in? Imagine trying to work 4 bundles, plus advos and parcels from the front seat of your Subaru or Blazer? Stopping at each mail box will be a two minute ordeal, not to mention if you have to leave the vehicle for a door delivery! Its unsafe, physical suicide, and mental insanity!

    Jun 11, 2009
  • anon

    FSS will be the death of the carrier. Spending nearly 8 hours walking the streets in sub-zero or 100+ temperatures will not be sustainable for a 25yrs+ career. Not to mention the additonal hours of being forced to work OT because USPS can't manage to properly staff their offices. With 10+hours on the street, the body will start to fall apart. Injuries will increase 8-fold as well as increases in diseases such as arthritis. Those who do manage to retire as a career letter carrier will be too crippled to enjoy their remaining years. Also, automated mail provides a lower quality of service. Vacants, movers, & holds are often left in sequence and delivered by unknowing subs. PARS is doing a great job, but expired forwards as well as UBBM are often delivered by unknowing replacements. It makes the USPS look bad and incompetent. As a poster stated above, management is too focused on quantity and not quality, all for the sake of making the numbers to get that bigger PFP. We are suppose to be a "service" to the public, and instead the USPS has become nothing but a managerial game of numbers. FSS and DPS machines are obsolete when used in conjunction. It creates 4th bundle issues that result in costly manual sortation by carriers. If the USPS is to continue down the automation road, it must invest in equipment that handles flats and letters simultaneously - creating one bundle. So, stop throwing away billions on FSS equipment and buildings to house them. Mail volume will never return to its' previous peak. The world is "going green" and the younger technology-friendly generation may never purchase a stamp. Wait for a more feasible one-bundle system to be developed. Don't purchase machines that only do half the job and are not providing significant return on our investment. Stop the waste of billions of dollars. We are in no postiion to be squandering this money and with the current low volumes, we will not be able recuperate our costs for a long, long time.

    Jun 10, 2009
  • anon

    No, I never filed Workman's Comp because I got a great office job for the last 12 years and it would have been almost impossible to link the carrier wear and tear after 12 years.

    Jun 10, 2009
  • anon

    DPS is pretty good, but get this. On Long Island, management has decided that, in order to meet on-time goals, they send employees to neighboring offices with missent mail in the morning, then in the afternoon send employees out to deliver missequenced mail to mailboxes. However, they simply place these letters in the customer's mailboxes, even if the customer has taken their mail in for the day. The reason management is spending all this money? I think it's so they can get their bonuses for on-time delivery! Incidentally, this only applies to first class mail from Long Island to Long Island...if your paycheck comes from New Jersey and is delayed, it is not sent out in the afternoon. But a postcard from a real estate agent will get this special treatment!

    Jun 10, 2009
  • anon

    The PO could care less about the health of carriers performing another circus act handling more bundles of mail in sub-zero weather 7 hours a day plus overtime forced down their throats for 9 hrs of street time. I wonder if the theory people realize after they put their kool-aid down, that vehicles running longer due to increased street time means more fuel. They like to crunch numbers so crunch 5 dollars a gallon then 6 dollars etc. With the dollar going down due to printing money for Wall Street banks and Stimulus funding the price of fuel will go up more then 5 or 6 dollars a gallon. Crunch the numbers now not when it happens in the near future.

    Jun 10, 2009
  • anon

    FSS will be yet another automated nightmare Can you imagine a day after a holiday when every flat is worked.This will make curtailing mail at high volume times impossible. They can't manage the dps volumes through the week they work everything and pay overtime on mondays and have us stand around by Wednesday I can foresee them putting advos and pennysavers together the day after a holiday and telling you it won't take anymore time.

    Jun 10, 2009
  • anon
    6miles

    1. The system under FSS makes no provision for non-machinable circulars, ADVO, etc. I am reading tales posted by carriers where FSS has already come in of either having to case their circs, or work the non-machinable circs one at a time into their FSS flats, since carriers with walking routes can't take a 4th bundle. This, of course, takes a lot more time and certainly isn't covered in the DOIS. 2. I find it amusing that after all of this time with the different areas having FSS, that the PO still hasn't written an SOP for carries delivering a park-and-loop delivery route. Working flats out of my arm, AND my bag??? How in the hell will that "save" time?? Ours is supposed to come in about Jan 2010. Can't wait !!!

    Jun 09, 2009
  • anon

    Soon I'll not only be a letter carrier juggling 3 to 4 bundles of mail not to mention your accountables and parcles. I'll also be able to work for the circus as a professional juggler.

    Jun 09, 2009
  • anon

    "This blog is hosted by the OIG’s Delivery directorate." Dictator was misspelled!!!!

    Jun 09, 2009
  • anon

    They make it sound like DPS is such a wonderful thing. Sure wish these jokers would try juggling three or four bundles. Not to mention all the delayed mail due to dps errors. And the mess they call cfs now. Keep the blinders on. Tell everyone how wonderful those machines are and spend a fortune on some more!

    Jun 09, 2009
  • anon

    We didn't get DPS till after 1996! And the problems we had then are the same problems we have now. So much for the accuracy. As for the time, the DPS has nothing to do with how fast the mail gets delivered. The carrier does. I can't believe someone would print such an article. Then again, they put out the DPS machines. Oh well, so much for logic or common sense.

    Jun 09, 2009
  • anon

    The best point of all---the people making the rules have NEVER actually done the job. Injuries and accidents will most certainly increase due to the added physical stress and the attention needed to sort 2-3-or 4 bundles "on-the-go".

    Jun 09, 2009

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