• Project Title:
  • First‐Line Supervisor Resources
  • Start Date:
  • Wednesday, May 8, 2019
  • Estimated Report Release Date:
  • January 2020

Postal Service first-line supervisors oversee the day-to-day execution of operations that drive services and delivery of mail to the public. As such, they significantly contribute to ensuring customers receive quality service and receive mail and parcels on time and in good condition.

Factors that contribute to the success of first-line supervisors include having a strong organizational structure, a clear understanding of job responsibilities, the right qualifications, an optimal span of control, and adequate training opportunities.

For the purposes of our work, we define a first-line supervisor as the first layer of management directly above the craft employee, specifically customer service supervisors at retail facilities, and distribution, transportation, and maintenance operation supervisors at processing facilities. Our objective is to assess whether Postal Service first-line supervisors are adequately prepared and positioned to meet operational goals and objectives.

  • Are first-line supervisors provided with job descriptions (or a detailed list of job responsibilities) when they are promoted? Are the job descriptions adequate and do they align with actual duties performed?
  • Do first-line supervisors have the right qualifications to ensure execution of responsibilities?
  • Do first-line supervisors oversee an appropriate number of employees (i.e., span of control) to effectively execute their supervisory responsibilities? If not, how many employees should a supervisor oversee at a retail facility? A processing facility?
  • Are first-line supervisors (permanent and acting 204b) provided with adequate training? If not, what additional training would you recommend? Does the lack of training negatively impact their ability to execute supervisory tasks?

Comments (42)

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  • anon

    Simple answer is no. They do there best with what they know. The Manager or Postmaster is required to continue to train, mentor and subsidize the workload of these supervisors. However, we do not have the time allowed to do this either. Thanks to the Districts DLT and AVP's continuing to create more and more redundant reports, telecoms, meetings so they can keep there jobs. EAS at the AO's and stations are there to be held accountable for what goes wrong. That is it. The District leadership does not care if they are trained correctly or if they have time to do there jobs. EAS have brought this up time and time again with UMPAS & NAPS throughout the years. USPS Headquarters sends out information to the Districts to stop the redundancy, amount of telecoms and excessive reports, but this only last for about a month, then it goes back to the way it was before. 99% of the employees want to do the right thing the right way, but more times then not, we cannot get the work done correctly due to the time limitations given to us. Consolidating stations just makes it worst. The sad part with all of this, is that the customer suffers. Again, the leadership does not care, they will move on in a year or two and leave the systemic problems to the next person. On and on it goes. It was not always like this. There was a time when we could do are jobs timely and correctly. Those days are long gone. I find it very disappointing to see the USPS move in this direction.

    Jun 17, 2019
  • anon

    Obviously, the postmasters do not have the resources, training, or the ability to perform their duties. I have been complaining for years to my local PO manager, Brooklyn Postmaster General, and the PSOIG about serious delivery and courtesy issues stemming from the 11210 PO. No one knows or cares about how to handle these issues. The lack of resources is an obvious and ongoing issue in the USPS.

    Jun 16, 2019
  • anon

    No front line supervisors do not have the training they need. as a supervisor in a level 21 office promoted from a city carrier to a 204b then supervisor all the same office it is extremely hard, working 10 to 12 hour days being paid for 8. You don't have the correct number of employees to qualify for a second supervisor. Have a contract employees do not count in a ratio nor RCA's. you are not given the training of how to handle grievances brought by unions. Union stewards get more training than supervisors do and how to handle grievances. That's why most grievances are lost by management due to lack of knowledge and time to do the research. when you call for help from another station they themselves are understaffed in management and employees and are unable to help you with your issues. if you have a light truck arrived in the morning you were still required to get all of your reports done on time even if you don't have the data that is required due to the truck being late. otherwise you are bombarded with emails stating you have not completed this report continually and it sent to district-wide for everyone else to see that you yourself have not completed the report. Many times, I had to deliver Mel due to not having enough staff then come back and do all my reports. At times it feels that being the supervisor higher management wants you to be a machine and have no emotions have no family life have no compassion and care for your employees. Many times it feels like it's all about numbers not the people. and in my case if a Union steward takes a dislike to you for whatever reason they go out of their way to make it hard for you to harass you and as management you really have no recourse as you can't file any kind of action against them. You have to just take it. also if you want to move up it's all about who you know it isn't about your work experience the hours you put in the things you have done to promote the postal service and to follow its rules and regulations. as to the many reports that are do add a semi repetitive some you just put the numbers in why you don't know you just been told to do it and this is how you do it and this is what you do. there has been no training on how to take care of the customers how to help them with their package searches how to handle an irate customer how to keep your cool how to be compassionate how to follow the postal guidelines or their image there's no training for any of that that I have been involved in or seen as I would have taken it. as to the rules and regulations of into four different post offices via carrion clerking detail cetera and they all follow their own rules they choose which rules and regulations to follow which ones not to so it's hard ito do your job when you know it's the right thing to do. it's also hard to do your job when the higher up are gone early noon on Fridays gone for the whole weekend and yet you're still expected to get the work done that isn' right it isn't fair.

    Jun 14, 2019
  • anon

    I am currently a Postmaster in a level 18 office and the only training that I received was Postmaster's Essential Training (what a joke). This training was for a week of the training with someone reading to us from a book. Granted I did learn a few things that I did not know from my time as a PTPO Postmaster but like everyone else that has responded to this survey I was looking for training that was more on the report side and software (programs) side. There is no mentorship offered within the Postal Service, what a shame to lose all of that knowledge. I know in the coming years there will be a lot of upward mobility and no in-depth training. Personally if the Postal Service wants to compete in the business world the Service needs to have a better training system not this trainer reading to the trainee, 8 hours of this tends to put the trainee to sleep. The Postal Service spends a lot of money to send select few to Norman for in-depth training, how about sending newly appointed Postmasters to the same type of training. I have been a Postmaster now for 5 years and still couldn't tell you what any of the daily reports mean, let alone how to properly read them, but I do know how to get my staff to do what needs to get done and apparently my numbers show it. Nor can I properly execute some of the programs which is extremely frustrating, especially when dealing with the SCR program. It's great that the Postal Service wants to get the career employees engaged but what about the middle/lower management? Without the proper tools and knowledge to execute the vast data and programs that are required from us the system is bound to fail and I believe that is what is happening now and it will only get worse.

    Jun 03, 2019
  • anon

    Margaret I agree with you. All of management is basically raising your hand and say I want to work on the desk. Joke on having a y background or schooling in management. It's why I would never ask to be on the desk.

    Jun 09, 2019
  • anon

    “Our objective is to assess whether Postal Service first-line supervisors are adequately prepared and positioned to meet operational goals and objectives.” You’re joking, right? Define adequate? There are goals involved? Then if they fail, just move them somewhere else...again...and again... then move them up... again...and again. 30 year Postal veteran here, and I’ve never seen such ineptness. Do now there’s going to be a study? Good Lord.

    May 31, 2019
  • anon

    I would like to leave a comment that after numerous times of being the recipient of packages from overseas specifically Germany shipped through DHL and turned over to the US PS I would have to say that I’m only receiving 10% of what is sent. I can only imagine that the rest of the packages have been stolen by postal employees, airline carrier employees and that the US PS makes it extremely difficult if not impossible to talk to anyone about it to file a complaint or to do anything at all about not receiving your packages. After my discussions with Several people resulting in a dead end and in peoples attitude is that they owe me no explanation for the loss of my package or for the non-delivery of my packages. Incompetent employees and or thieves will take care of it for you With no explanation whatsoever.

    May 29, 2019
  • anon

    I believe one of the important resources we have at our fingertips are the computer programs that have been developed to help us manage our people. The NSP program was an eye opener, and I learned so much. My only complaint was, we spent 40 hours role playing and doing communication dynamics, the whole first week. Although I realize the importance of this type of communication, the class completely missed one of the biggest areas - programs. As a Supervisor, a huge part of our everyday work is done in the many, many programs we utilize to do our job effectively. Timekeeping, volume, leave, and a multitude of lesser programs that we depend on to give us the information we need, and allow us to give our superiors the information they need, During the entire 6 weeks of training, there was absolutely no training in the use of these programs. I learned piecemeal, scrambling to pick up what I could as I went, trial and error, Some of these programs are confusing, and training is required to be able to fully utilize the information calculated in them. I don't feel like I am effectively getting the most from the employees when I'm not adept at getting the data from the programs, or being able to analyze that data. The other hindrance we are all facing is staff cuts in all crafts, We spend an inordinate amount of time trying to fill the holes in our schedules, borrowing from other offices who are also short staffed, and ultimately, doing the craft work ourselves to get the mail out. This affects our customer service in every aspect of the postal service.

    May 29, 2019
  • anon

    One of the most important resources that upper management needs to provide front line supervisors is adequate personnel to accomplish the job. This fanatical focus on cutting positions based on either a computer program or by people who never set foot on the workroom floor, is ridiculous. And it's causing serious customer service issues as well as increased overtime and grievance payments. The worst part is that the people who mandate these cuts, and won't listen to any reasonable feedback or opposition to them, never go into the field and see with their own eyes the negative and drastic effects. Sadly, front line supervisors and managers have become too fearful to push back with any kind of fortitude. As a result, they often do not report deficiencies related to staffing, or falsify information on actions that are reported as being completed, but are actually not. Distribution complete scans as well as PO Box complete times are entered well before those tasks are actually accomplished. If you walk into many stations in Colorado Springs, you'll find box sections where records are not being updated, you'll find RFS packages that haven't been returned in a timely manner; Business reply mail that hasn't been processed; Parcels or certified letters that sit on the shelves for long periods before being returned; UBBM mail that is piling up, and a host of other customer service issues, all due to a lack of adequate staffing. There are only enough personnel to tackle these areas when they become so ignored that it only becomes an issue as a result of a complaint from a customer, or the sheer number of pieces grow so large, the problem can't be hid any longer. If a front line supervisor in this area did complain about not being able to accomplish these required tasks on a daily basis, they are threatened by upper management and accused of "not managing your people properly", so they keep quiet. Probably one of the worst outcomes of the ill advised staffing shortages, is that you have supervisors being forced to accomplish more and more craft work. You don't want to be in a position of paying supervisors to do the work of a craft employee and not have the time for the management work they are being paid a higher salary for. So currently, front line supervisors do not have the most critical resource they need to run their areas, and until some neutral party comes down their level and puts their eyes actually on the current situation and perform an honest assessment, the problem will not change.

    May 28, 2019
  • anon

    You explained our situation in such realistic terms! This is me and my coworker everyday! We are supervisors/clerks. When my manager and postmaster ask me why am I failing on whichever report they decide to deconstruct that day I question their sanity. Are they being delusional or what? I have lost hope in things getting better, upper management love to push to get the results that they want ignoring the fact that there aren’t enough quality workers to accomplish the results that they want to see. And one of the worst feeling is that they see the effort put forth and they are NOT appreciative. We don’t need medals or public recognition just a hey I see you and see what you’re trying to accomplish. These bosses are trying to cover up work not done or badly done for what? Anyway again thanks for your comment because you stated facts.

    Jun 02, 2019
  • anon

    While being technically proficient at the job is important, having the appropriate level of actual leadership development would do wonders for postal management. Just because someone can remember to complete a bunch of forms and checklists doesn't make them a good leader. Higher level management also needs to be held accountable for lower level managers lacking the proper training to complete their jobs.

    May 28, 2019
  • anon

    I can only comment on my personal experiences here at Wilmette, IL. We are a level 21 office offering passport services. We have been understaffed in SSA position for well over a year now. There are too many time when we rely on 1 SSA to handle customers therefore making it necessary to cancel or send our passport customers to other offices. I currently have to call 5 other offices when making a schedule, just to have 2 SSA's on duty each day. Even 2 SSA's per day leaves us with 1 SSA during the lunch breaks, resulting in a high probability for a WTIL failed mystery shop.

    May 28, 2019
  • anon

    We get trained on the job as we go. The classroom concentrates on little things, big things llike finance and personel not enough. When we give ojt the quantity of hours comes into question and should not

    May 28, 2019
  • anon

    Front line supervisors are provided with a job description at the beginning of the application process. The description is a base line of what the supervisor position entails. unfortunately, the 204B's that are applying may not have encountered all aspects of what a postmaster is looking for because each post office uses different applications and completes different reports. Which means, unless the 204B has the opportunity to go on details to different offices ( which seldom happens), they are at a disadvantage. I believe there should be a training class once an employee shows interest. This class should give the expectations and foundation for the local office as well as the plant. At the end of the class there should be a list of available 204Bs to the Pooms in the area to disperse when needed, giving the 204Bs the ability to practice and master the craft. I believe that one supervisor should only manage 12-15 people, especially carriers. It gives them the ability to become personable, encouraging and can keep track of their whereabouts effectively. This could minimize stress, workload, missed MSP scans ,stationary time and turnover rates. It could also give more freedom for street observations which could possibly minimize accidents.

    May 28, 2019
  • anon

    I have been employed for the USPS since 1992. During that period of time I started as a TE , PTF , then regular carrier. I was also, a Branch President, Vice President and Steward. I always felt that a front line Supervisor job was probably one of the easiest jobs out there. That's because I never did the job until 3 years ago, boy was I wrong. The front line Supervisor has to withstand comments like what I have read on this sight. They have listen to all the put downs that Carriers and clerks a like make about how them, and still have treat every employee with dignity and respect , which is not always and easy thing to do. I would like to ask the individuals that seem to feel front line Supervisor's don't know their jobs. Why don't YOU apply for the job ? If you have the knowledge over the people that are applying for the job , and feel that you can make the USPS a better place to work. Apply for the job, don't put down the individuals who would like to better their families by stepping forward to do the job. I have worked for the Postal service for over 25 years. I took the SCS job for 2 reasons, my knees were wearing out, and I wanted to try and help out some of the "new " employees . I surely didn't do it for the money because , the USPS pay scale for Carriers with the amount of time on the job pays better than my current positon as a SCS. If you are still reading this, think about things this way. A Customer service Supervisor is hired to do one thing. To up hold the rules and regulations the USPS and the Unions have spent over 100 years working for, and nothing more. If a craft employee breaks the rules, that is what the SCS is there for to enforce those rules. If Management breaks the contracts, that is what the Union is for. So , if your going to complain about the knowledge the front- line Supervisors have , maybe you should step forward , and keep the USPS strong for the next 200 years? I agree some Supervisors should not be Supervisors. However, the same could be said about some of the employees within the craft. The system is not perfect. Working together , and sharing the knowledge is the only way I feel the Postal service will survive.

    May 28, 2019
  • anon

    I myself worked in a craft position at the plant for 19 years-204b on and off for10yrs of those years. Took a third party test and I was the only one who passed the test at that time but could not get a supervisor position that I wrote for. I finally decided that I was leaving the plant since it was not what you know but.... to get a supervisor job there, and I landed a supervisor job in customer service/delivery. I love working with all my clerks and carriers, there is nothing but respect from me to them. I have always believed that I treat a person how I want them to treat me and I will NOT tolerate the he said /she said. Sure I have a few that don't mind me, but that's not my job to be there for someone to like or dislike, I have a responsibility to make sure the mail gets to our customers via my employees. But in hindsight I do believe that I could use more training. I had no previous experience in delivery/retail at the postal service and received 1 week training from a 204b at the time I was hired. I lacked in-depth training to be proficient in my daily duties. It took 4 month for my postmaster to even show me how to do 1412's. I have been there a year and a half and I am still not trained in AM delivery but there has been 4 people trained as 204b in the AM. I can read manuals, sure...but not all people learn by reading, some need hands on experience like I do since I was never a carrier. And what I really don't understand is why the heck is there 2 supervisor and a postmaster there by 8am but I am the only closing supervisor after 4pm? That is a lot of responsibility for one person to take care of customers at the window, answer phones, check all carrier back, check and close all the 50 LLV's, do all reports make sure all mail is on last truck, go around and look for all EOD missed scan packages, and hope that you don't have a carrier that breaks down or gets in an accident ect... and then wonder why - why can't we keep any supervisors on closing. HUM....

    May 28, 2019
  • anon

    No. How do we learn what we need to to move up? I have been a supervisor for 13+ years. Need training and guidance. We need some website that helps guide us when our immediate Postmaster does not provide any leadership skills or motivation to teach us what we need to learn. I see many employees move very quickly up the ladder, very frustrating to work for a company that doesn't promote, or train seasoned supervisors to get to the next level. ELD leadership program wasn't as beneficial as it promoted to be.

    May 28, 2019
  • anon

    Thank you for your response, Michelle. First off, let me also thank you for your service as a supervisor for 13+ years, as I know this position is not the easiest to maintain! By chance, do you happen to fall into what we consider a first-line supervisor (customer service supervisors at retail facilities, and distribution, transportation, and maintenance operation supervisors at processing facilities)? Did you participate in the ASP, NSP, or both? Have you taken an additional courses on HERO? We appreciate your response and thanks for leading the charge!

    May 29, 2019
  • anon

    The front line supervisor is expected to manage too many employees at one time. The pay is not commensurate with the duties the you are expected to complete. Many of the employees you manage make more than front line supervisors do. Job is highly over-rated.

    May 28, 2019
  • anon

    Frontline supervisors are creating a toxic environment for craft workers. They are hired and promoted with no knowledge of procedures and contracts. People are treated like slaves. There is no compassion or even consideration for employees. The "re-training" of supervisors to create better working conditions has failed miserably. When people are treated fairly and respected for the jobs they do, they work harder. When you are told what a loser you are, you give up.

    May 26, 2019
  • anon

    Thank you for your response, Carl. I'm sorry to hear about your unfortunate experiences, but would like to say that no one should feel as though they are a slave. If you have experienced a poor supervisor, I apologize, but hope that you know your work makes a difference and is appreciated. We appreciate your response and hope that our audit findings/recommendations will have an impact on those types of supervisors. Thank you!

    May 29, 2019
  • anon

    No! Too much nepotism! Most I've come in contact with are just plain mean and nasty. Treating carriers as if they are an enemy. Also, promoting people who haven't ever worked anywhere but the post office because they don't even have a high school diploma! If you can't even get thru high school or get a GED, how can you supervise people.

    May 26, 2019
  • anon

    Why is it that almost universally, 204b and supervisor promotions come from the ranks of CCAs, PSEs, RCAs, or janitors? Consistently make those with the least experience and postal knowledge the boss.

    May 25, 2019
  • anon

    The answer to this question is not cut and dry. The following factors should be considered: 1) What’re the priorities of the District/Area. They should all be the same, but they are not. 2) Who’s training the 204b’s? It should be a uniform process, but everyone trains them differently. A successful and efficient unit usually trains new leaders in a manner that promotes the same success. Units with horrible performance scores that are outliers on numerous reports should not be allowed to train 204b’s and new supervisors. 3) who checks on new supervisor and/or 204b progress? It’s their own manager. There should be an individual that’s independent from their own unit. If we want to train successful supervisor we need start with train of thought. The Simple answer is that our overall process will not be successful until we have a uniform process in place on the front line.

    May 24, 2019
  • anon

    Thank you for your response, Josh. Just as many people who have commented, you've made some great points. Regarding #2, yes everyone does train them (204bs) differently and from what we have learned it is at a local discretion up to the managers on what/how they learn. I also think you what you said about the performance scores was interesting. We appreciate your response and thanks for your time.

    May 29, 2019
  • anon

    My letters and package gift to a friend were not delivered this year. The local post mail clerk kept insisting a missing detail . My friend and I keep correspondence for decades, same address. The clerk hinted the rigid postal computer system demands something else. Meanwhile our letters and gifts keep returning back to sender. Please help 2/ the same clerk made an error to another case involving international package gift that was sending back to me last week. Cost me60$. That was Easter gift , no need to resend. Can I claim a refund?

    May 24, 2019
  • anon

    In my experience it is difficult to improve performance when current craft employee contracts are in favor of employees. I also see this position as over worked and under paid. They are supervising employees who make more money than them. The union has unlimited time to fight employee grievances and supervisors have minimal time to prepare contentions. In conclusion there is too much work to fit into an 8 hour day. And when another supervisor is out sick, day off or vacation there is no coverage which means you have to take on theat job that day also. USPS needs to be audited from top to bottom. Employees that are not productive and add nothing to the future of changes coming need to be placed in positions where they can be productive and or retire.

    May 24, 2019
  • anon

    Thank you for your response, Al. We plan to make a serious impact in our audit and hopefully provide adequate changes/solutions. We appreciate your response!

    May 29, 2019
  • anon

    Lack of training in regulation and procedures definitely has an impact on the quality of service provided. I believe all USPS employees should be trained on what is legal and illegal when handling mail and packages in any situation.

    May 24, 2019
  • anon

    Amusing topic, considering how frequently OIG audits find that management, in general, is inadequately trained, lacks understanding of their responsibilities, fails to follow established procedures and protocols and often are unaware of the same. But seriously, the problem lies not in in the amount or quality of training, lack of accurate job description or number of employees under one's supervision. These are all important factors but count for naught without a supervisor recruitment program that prioritizes aptitude. This most important resource falls under "having the right qualifications" for the job and cannot be provided by USPS. It's also where any path for success begins. Institutions of higher learning require entrance exams to sort out prospective students. This helps ensure all parties are spared the waste of time and resources where odds of outcome favor failure. The US military sorts enlisted inductees with the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. Opportunities for advanced programs are offered to those who demonstrate the highest likelihood of success. There are no such filters within the US Postal Service. With maddening frequency we see individuals step into supervisory roles who weren't particularly adept at their craft functions and who exhibit no discernable skill set beyond a pulse and desperation to be "somebody important." Tidy up training programs, job descriptions and personnel apportionments. These can all use some work. But first and foremost filter applicants through a targeted vocational aptitude battery. Pay a few bucks to have it written and administered by a third party with a proven track record. Seal off loopholes that fast-track family relations or crony loyalists into and through the ranks of management. These are essential first steps to transform endemic failure into a hope for success.

    May 24, 2019
  • anon

    Great response Mr. Davis. Especially about the loopholes that fast-track family relations or crony loyalist into and through the ranks of management. This is so prevalent it seems in every district throughout the country and its seems to get worst every year. The aptitude test is a great idea to implement. Currently the leadership in Los Angeles just wants "yes" men. If you are a free thinker you will be targeted and pushed out. I was a HYPO 1 year and blackballed the next so I speak from experience. Thank you for your insight.

    Jun 17, 2019
  • anon

    Thank you for your comment, Donn. I believe you made some very relevant points and backed them up with your logic. With our objective and sub-objectives of the audit we plan to fully investigate the roles of the first-line supervisor and everything that involves. As it seems to most, there clearly needs to be some changes but how these changes will come into affect is left to be written. We appreciate your response and the comments it has generated!! Thank you!

    May 29, 2019
  • anon

    Man that was the best reply I have seen yet. As a carrier for 23 years in 3 offices, an ex-204b delivery supervisor for almost 2 yrs in a level 21 PO, a NALC steward and outside a food service manager for over 3yrs and a veteran of the Army, I gotta say that this is what i see too. I've seen a lot of problems, but this is at the core and it only explodes into larger problems as time passes and promotions are made. Make leaders from those who are informal leaders already. The future is automated and the most obvious choice for the post office next personnel chop is management. The development of a program that implements a PC unit for the carrier to interface with and report to is the future. It only makes profit sense and it evens the playing field. You need only occasional audits to maintain accurate self-reporting of mail volumes. Use the human hands to move the mail and AI to generate and evaluate the numbers and report to a few, very educated, people that will be looking at numbers that aren't fabricated by people with a vested interest in them being good numbers.

    May 28, 2019
  • anon

    Agree entirely with this response. The Postal Service undervalues critical thinking. We have 5000 performance and compliance reports providing us with data for every 10 employees who can answer the question of what the report means, why it's important, who needs to get it, how we are going to improve with it, and when is it redundant. Without question data is a luxury, but without engagement and problem solving skills... it's pearls to swine. You can't really train or provide that to someone with no aptitude for it.

    May 25, 2019
  • anon

    Amen. No truer words have been written than those Mr. Davis has put forth here.

    May 24, 2019
  • anon

    You are not given a job description however if you visit ecareer you can find a list of specific jobs. They do align somewhat with the duties assigned. Some do, some don’t. The previous ASP training for Supervisors need to be reinstated. You are shown the basics and then sink or swim, try to find a mentor to take you through, trial and error. All offices with more than 15 carriers with a retail unit should have 2 Supervisors and a Postmaster. Level 18 offices with carriers and retail unit/s should at least have 1 Supervisor. Presently we are working 9-10 hour days without a lunch. We are not been forced to but if you do then you are seen as not being a team player and if you do take lunch then things don’t get done. Level 20 offices with 1 Supervisor if you are the opening Supervisor you are supervising carriers getting mail count and reports in, meeting with the union answering the phone handling customers request for management at the window completing 1838Cs all at the same time. Gone are the days when there would be a Postmaster in at 8:00 to assist with such. The Postmaster is now merely either an opening or closing Supervisor. There are Level 18 offices with 9 routes (9 regular carriers), 6 RCAs, 4 Clerks a retail unit with Mystery Shopping, an off-site rmpo with a Postmaster only yet is mandated to contribute 15 hours of Clerk work weekly! The amount of employees being supervised at a retail site is contingent upon whether there are letter carriers in that building. We no longer have supervisors assigned to retail. Most offices are operating short staffed (craft). The carriers know that we are understaffed and do take advantage of this situation. There is only so much 1 person can do.

    May 23, 2019
  • anon

    No, I do not believe that new supervisors have enough training or knowledge. It seems like employees just need to raise their hand, and "poof" you're a supervisor. I work in a level 20 office, and the largest part of my day I am the only employee, and I have a Postmaster and a Supervisor watching me. Seems to me this is a big waste of postal funds, considering the fact that we are "broke".

    May 23, 2019
  • anon

    Front-line supervisors have more technology resources to do their job, but the majority lack in-depth training to be proficient in their daily duties. Training is what's needing - mandatory and extensive training beyong ASP, USP, and NSP. HERO has many great training courses but most supervisors are so busy that they can't sit down and focus on training. Perhaps a mandatory 4 hours or more of ongoing training per week away from their office is necessary - along with testing to see if the subject material is being comprehended and understood - this way we can focus on mandatory development.

    May 23, 2019
  • anon

    Thank you for your comment, Tim. You have made some relevant arguments. We were aware of the ASP&NSP, but what is USP if you don't mind? We appreciate the response!

    May 29, 2019
  • anon

    no supervisors these day don't have the proper training or resources to do their job correctly. start with the human resources/ offices always short and no replacements or flexibility as to where to lend employees from. the administrative tasks are so many that they can not supervise correctly... always at a computer doing redundant reports. more admin hours and no credits in the supervisor work credits.

    May 23, 2019
  • anon

    Thank you for your response, Elizabeth. As mentioned, we do plan on looking at first-line supervisors from a training perspective to determine what they are required to do and what is available for them to take. We also understand that gaining SWC can be difficult. We appreciate your response!

    May 29, 2019
  • anon

    Our development of 90 homes in Santa Clarita has the worst post persons I’ve ever seen. Our mail is constantly put in the wrong mail box. Packages that fit in back will not come out in front. Our carriers are constantly changing. There are 3 streets here but they have the same house numbers. Carriers don't read whole addresses. Mail has been reported lost coming in and going out. Emails have been sent to two different supervisors but no response and no change. Wrong Mail has even been put in a box that the home is no longer occupied. What if something important is put in the wrong box and the owner of the box is on vacation? Please do something about this!

    May 22, 2019

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