• Reply to: Brainstorm Ideas to Help the Postal Service   2 years 4 months ago

    Why can't the post office perform other consumer services such as drivers license, car tags, the simpler tasks that require the customer to bring in all the completed forms. I realize this is a state function right now, but if post offices are under utilized, why not let them take on some of these other functions. I brought this up a public closure meeting in a rural community and the state representative there did not think this would work because it's two different agencies, federal and state. Aren't we all trying to save money??? I believe there's a movement at the top of USPS to privatize the whole thing, sad thing is, no one is going to take on universal service, every mailbox every day, six days a week.

  • Reply to: Offering eMailboxes to Consumers: An Opportunity for the Postal Service?   2 years 4 months ago

    Wow, what a discussion! I've been suggesting this sort of thing for several years to everyone I know, it just seems like the common sense thing to do. Email isn't something to be afraid of or shy away from, it's not going away. I would think that the USPS reputation, "neither rain nor..." could apply to electronic use as well, with the security and service that would have to come with this kind of idea. It seems to me that the crux of the problem is that the USPS is a government agency, which has so many rules and regulations concerning competing in the open market and stuff, however they already do that with Fed Ex, UPS and others with physical package delivery, so why not electronically with Google, Yahoo and the others? Think of the revenue it could generate. Perhaps they should hire some of the internet gurus to help them get started. As for postal employees who may lose their jobs, I am truly sorry, this very thing happened at my place of employment, and I don't know how to stop it with the way the world is going. Almost all of us will be faced with this problem going forward, as technology changes and makes us change with it.

  • Reply to: Offering eMailboxes to Consumers: An Opportunity for the Postal Service?   2 years 4 months ago

    Just like other bloggers, I specifically came to this website to submit the EXACT idea! The most significant problem (and the main reason many people don't use electronic media) is the insecurity of their information being stolen. U.S. lawmakers have not come up with successfully enforceable laws to secure info on the internet and its users. If the USPS could develop electronic services with enforceable laws to protect the information sent and retained, (simillarly to the way mail is protected), it would be an extremely successful way to show the government can still work and get the post office out of bankruptcy. The price of keeping and sending information would be offset by the security of knowing your information has laws protecting it.
    If electronic storage and transfer could be that secure and "snail-mail" was to become slower, I do believe ALL persons would use some sort of electronic media. It could be even more widely used if the USPS developed their own, "extremely secure" hardware that would send and store electronic mail in a simple format that anyone of any age could learn to use.
    It's time the government stopped their squabbling, put aside their greediness, and step into the twenty-first century with the rest of us! (I know it's a long-shot, but one can always hope!)
    Happy holidays and thanks for listening!

  • Reply to: Offering eMailboxes to Consumers: An Opportunity for the Postal Service?   2 years 4 months ago

    USPS could bring in a great deal of revenue by copying what municipalities do with their busses: sell advertising! No other entity visits every street in every city and town in this country, and the valuable space on the sides of the mail jeeps should appeal to advertisers both large and small. Go a step further and envision a postage stamp depicting the logo of General Electric or Ford.

    There's no need to tear your hair and say "we're broke!" Behave like a business --- and if you won't, kindly tell me why!

    Dan Robinson -Pacifica CA

  • Reply to: How Far Does Your 44 Cents Go?   2 years 4 months ago

    Some of the reason for the lost revenue is first the forever stamp. People buy them up and hoard them. They also became exremely popular because of the many 1 and 2 cent increases. Nobody likes playing with 1 cent stamps. Should have made 5 cent increases so you only need to add 1 extra stamp. Right now i say go for a 10 cent increase every year for a couple years. The other issue is the unfair distribution of mailboxes. I drive 4 miles to the nearest mailbox and see 3 more within a mile and the 4th one is in a post office lot. Consolidate mailbox pickups and delivery to one truck not two. We had a mailbox right outside our apartment complex and it was removed for supposed lack of use.

  • Reply to: Postal Service Revenue: What Should be Done?   2 years 4 months ago

    Start charging advertising first class postage. If it's cloggong my mailbox up 3-4 days a week, one can only imagine what it's doing to the USPS system. from pick up to delivery.

  • Reply to: Offering eMailboxes to Consumers: An Opportunity for the Postal Service?   2 years 4 months ago

    sandi, the service you want is called mail forwarding for international mail (costs the same whether domestic or foreign addresses). The service can cost as much as $1 a page plus an annual fee Except for the cost my oldest son considered it for while he does Post Doc work in Germany. The companies image paper mail to send to the customer, but I believe what the Postal Service is offering instead would require that both the sender and recipient have to pick up eMailbox addresses for it to work.

    USPS also tried offering the same service idea a number of years ago and it flopped and wound up costing USPS (or its predecessor) money down the drain. The only thing that has changed since then is that the e-services field is far more crowded and e-services involve intense competition, which I don't think USPS is capable of competing with unless if offers a legal advantage in proof of delivery and reading.

    I believe what USPS has in mind is mailers converting to eMailbox at your request to send you mail electronically, which is more like the inexpensive forwarding service your cell phone provides. If it does not work well on a technical level you would just be substituting SPAM for bulk mail.

  • Reply to: Offering eMailboxes to Consumers: An Opportunity for the Postal Service?   2 years 4 months ago

    USPS needs to break the law and simply stop 6 day a week delivery, and if necessary reduce delivery to once every twp days. Delaying first class mail by closing 250 mail processing centers works directly contrary to reducing delivery days because it could ultimately lead to a four day delay before receipt, which makes it even less competitive with Email and E-faxes. .providing less frequent service. Competition is intense in e-services, which provide same day delivery. Online backup services provide he capability for lockbox, as does Dropbox.

    The only service USPS might be able to offer and have a monopoly on is proof of delivery email with a return receipt file marker for the emails to show which sent ones have been received and then read. As a government creature it has an advantage in trust over any private company thanks in part to the Postmaster General's constant oversight.

  • Reply to: Can the Postal Service Afford Alaska Bypass?   2 years 4 months ago

    I agree with the Postal Inspector General's conclusion except that the logic should be extended. No state should receive a net subsidy for postal services, although the mailing location and the delivery location should in bookkeeping get equal credit for the postage paid, since obviously most mail order companies ship from larger cities, yet without the customer receiving the delivery the entire postage transaction would not take place. Delivery frequency must be reduced in each state as much as needed to keep the mail service from actually losing money in that state down to as little as one day a month if necessary in remote areas which always raise costs.

    Universal service does not have to mean with the same hours of operation or delivery schedule.

  • Reply to: Postal Service Revenue: What Should be Done?   2 years 4 months ago

    Recently had a package sent from Santa Clarita Ca to Ontario Ca approximately 78 miles Package was sent from Santa Clarita Ca. to Raleigh NC then to Ontario Ca for a mileage of 5044 miles I think there is a opportunity here to improve at least the fuel savings

  • Reply to: Can the Postal Service Afford Alaska Bypass?   2 years 4 months ago

    I think there may be valid arguments for the existence of the "Alaska Bypass" service. But I don't think that forcing Postal rate-payers to fund such a service makes any sense at all.

    Based on your white paper, the program was initiated to address an operational problem in post office facilities. If that problem is gone, the program should either go with it, or charge a sustainable rate.

    If Alaskans need a service subsidy, that sounds like a great thing for the State of Alaska to fund for them.

  • Reply to: Offering eMailboxes to Consumers: An Opportunity for the Postal Service?   2 years 4 months ago

    I would love to not have to go to my physical mail box across from my house or at the Post Office to get my US mail. I would love to stay in my nice warm house and get my mail from my computer, retrieved from my ePO Box. Sweet!

  • Reply to: Offering eMailboxes to Consumers: An Opportunity for the Postal Service?   2 years 4 months ago

    This is a fantastic idea! I agree. The USPS needs to join the 21st century. They are still doing business like they were in the 18th century, essentially, except the prices have gone up. Federally certified e-mail, personal e-mail accounts, accessibility at the post office to computer terminals (like PO Boxes) etc... the whole system should go electronic. This would eliminate the carrier position, reduce gas consumption and bring the USPS out of the red.

  • Reply to: Can the Postal Service Afford Alaska Bypass?   2 years 4 months ago

    I have read the report. It is excellent. Tina and Chris above are right on. I, too, live in Alaska. I support any of the options suggested except the "improve infrastructure" -- because it is impractical--building many roads in Alaska is impractical. I will FAX a letter to the Alaskan Congressional delegation and to Sens. Lieberman and Collins and to the IG supporting the IG position. I encourage you to do likewise.

  • Reply to: Neighborhood Mail and the Future of the Postal Service   2 years 4 months ago

    Direct mail is basically used to build business and it is well suitable for small business groups. It is an important way for businesses to reach their customers, but many local small businesses and others underuse or avoid advertising mail.

  • Reply to: Brainstorm Ideas to Help the Postal Service   2 years 4 months ago

    How about a service addressees could subscribe to in which the USPS would withold direct mail advertising?

    I'm sure this has been kicked around already; I didn't read the previous 495 comments.

    The subscription price could be set high enough that it offsets revenue losses from lost advertising. Even if the subscriber numbers were low, profits would be gained and transportation costs would be saved.

    Also a potentially more economically feasible alternative to total replacement of the old Grumman LLVs would be to retrofit them by replacing the worn-out old Chevy Iron Dukes with some kind of small biodiesel plant. If a refurbishment program were done cleanly you could cost-cut the price of total unit replacement while gaining fuel economy. Two types of savings there.

    Shoot, you could really get wild with it and have a big whooping PR dream-come-true by developing some kind of joint partnership with a fast food chain, wherein your empty mailtrucks could swing by restaurants on their return routes, picking up waste oil for biodiesel refinement.

  • Reply to: Will Postal Service bosses go undercover in the future?   2 years 4 months ago

    I think it would be an eye-opener for them.

  • Reply to: Can the Postal Service Afford Alaska Bypass?   2 years 4 months ago

    Time for Alaska residents to stand on their own (and yes, I AM one). I am tired of the government subsidizing individuals (or states) at the expense of the greater country. If it is too expensive where you live to get groceries by freight - move. No one is "forced" to live in the bush. And I shouldn't have to help pay for you to "maintain the history" of the Native Americans that live there. Didn't realize that beans and soda by air were part of their heritage.

  • Reply to: Betting on the Postal Service?   2 years 4 months ago

    I am not too sure if these prediction markets will work. It's interesting though... the comparison between quasi governmental organizations and fortune 100 companies. I hope things don't continue in this fashion.

    Matthew

  • Reply to: Can the Postal Service Afford Alaska Bypass?   2 years 4 months ago

    and here i thought everybody can wherever wishes

  • Reply to: Will Postal Service bosses go undercover in the future?   2 years 4 months ago

    Thanks, let’s show the USA we care.

  • Reply to: Brainstorm Ideas to Help the Postal Service   2 years 4 months ago

    I live in a rural area, about three miles from my local post office and a half-hour's drive (on a good day) from the nearest larger city.

    I would LOVE to see the USPS negotiate a UPS and FedEx shipping option to "leave at local post office".

    The money UPS and FedEx saves by not going all the way to my driveway (and by not having to wrap packages in nasty plastic) could go to the USPS. That's revenue! (It's also a further revenue-generating opportunity because it brings people into the post office, and that's an opportunity to sell stamps and other mailing services.)

    I would be a much happier customer, having been given this choice — my important packages that I can't convince shippers to send by USPS would stay safe and dry at the post office (and UPS would no longer shot-put my packages 10-20 feet over my locked gate ... yes, they do this!). And for "signature required" deliveries, I would no longer have to drive a half-hour minimum (after spending at least an hour working my way through UPS's phone system) to pick up my package at their local sorting facility one or two or three days later (because they have to "find" the package and get someone to get it off their truck ... amazingly, the USPS can get a letter across the country in the time it takes UPS to communicate with its own drivers).

  • Reply to: Can the Postal Service Afford Alaska Bypass?   2 years 4 months ago

    IDIOT !!! Natives can choose to live in the bush or in town. Why do you believe they cannot choose where to live?
    FYI - Some Alaska natives actually live in the lower 48 states

  • Reply to: Will Postal Service bosses go undercover in the future?   2 years 4 months ago

    Too many management position that should be eliminated because if crrier have undertime supervisor should have too.

  • Reply to: How is the Postal Service Managing Its Forklift Fleet?   2 years 4 months ago

    As I indicated in my Feb 24 2010 post...

    Dynamic - Moving & Productive

    Static - Lacking movement in action or change. Undesirable.

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