• Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    You make a good point Trust Me. Renegotiation should be done in a way that does not hurt the Postal Service's reputation.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    Thanks for your comments. Free supplies are a really great benefit, but it is important to make sure customers use them appropriately.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    I agree the Postal Service should use the best practices of private industry when negotiating.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    Thank you for your comment. It's interesting to hear a supplier's perspective.

  • Reply to: Preventing Workers’ Compensation Fraud   4 years 10 months ago

    The Postal Service is just another form of welfare.
    Continue to hire individuals based on affirmative action instead of best qualified and this is what you get. Employee's who want a salary, don't want to work for it and know how to work the system.

  • Reply to: Options for the Postal Service   4 years 10 months ago

    In my office, I say go after the boss who is not working 8 hours a day. Leaves early at least 4 days a week.
    This is not fair pay and does not look good to the clerk who is told " clerk hours are only 6.50 hours a day".
    Ya, I say to myself, why do you leave early all the time!

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    As a contractor, I am willing to renegotiate to a point. My business and my ability to efficiently manage it is almost completely controlled by the USPS.
    Per the contract, I am told what I must pay employees per hour, the number of hours I must pay them for, (even if it takes less time to complete the job) the amount and kind of benefits that I must provide to each employee and the kind of uniforms that I must purchase and exactly what suppliers (only 3) that I can choose from. Yet they want me to renegotiate my costs downward without removing the "chains" in the contracts that "bind" me to it!

    If management would allow me to operate my business based on market conditions and my own judgement, I most certainly could reduce costs and improve efficiency and in turn improve customer service to the USPS customers that I serve.

    I'm affraid that as long as the bureaucrats are involved with operating the USPS, this will NEVER change and we WILL in the near future see the complete breakdown and failure of the USPS.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    When the PS equalizes work-share discounts so that they are actually saving money instead of losing money, maybe it will be able to get out othe red. Until you grow a pair and stand up to the big mailers you will be nothing but their tools.

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    am a fsm 100 clerk in a major installation (once the leading flat processing section in the nation) and since the AI and ATHS upgrades we can't even get certified. processing is down by 40% a compeletly compentent machine has been destroyed. and believe me i know flat processing and the FSS will be an even bigger failure. follow the money graft has to involed somewhere

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    Cost saving negotiations are part of the reality of doing business in our current economic situation. Major customers of the USPS regularly meet with their suppliers and even demand a 3% or more documented cost reduction/savings or they threaten to take their business elsewhere. Now this can't be done in every situation, but it is the drum beat of a consistent message that Suppliers must work together to keep the customer viable or face facts, the contract will cease to exist if the customer can't pay the bills. From my experience, USPS has not even had a drum to beat in this arena. Private industry is far more aggressive in demanding these kind of documented contributions to the bottomline.

  • Reply to: Leveraging Postal Service Purchasing Power to Generate Revenue   4 years 10 months ago

    Whenever bundling occurs there is the opportunity for suppliers to add costs. Unbundling costs reduces pricing down to real costs and not inflated ones. Currently Suppliers of USPS products and services combine shipping and handling costs with the price of the item. My recommendation is that the shipping costs need to be unbundled and paid separately. If you asked UPS or FedEx suppliers how those two companies pay for their shipping costs for their own supplies you would see that they are paid separately and are not bundled. Our CAPS (Centralized Accounting Payment System) could be used to streamline payment for USPS shipping costs. From the Suppliers that I have worked with, they would be willing to use this option on their Supply Chain side, but their Sales Group is very reluctant because they will lose margins. Also, all USPS contracts need to limit the mark up allowed on products. A recent whistle blower from the DOD called out a midwest company for exceeding the limit of a 30% mark up, they indicated that the same was happpenning to USPS but we could not take action as no such limit exists in our contracts. Working together USPS Sales and Procurement can open doors and meet new contacts and leverage relationships to grow USPS revenue and reduce costs. Procurement should have a USPS Sales contact for every major contract that works directly with Procurement and the Supplier to maximize our revenue. Just that appearance of a partnership, sends the right message on the direction the Supplier relationship is going to take with USPS.

  • Reply to: Automation and the Life of the Letter Carrier   4 years 10 months ago

    I am a letter carrier of over 22 years and I have just finished filling out the application for FERS early retirement (VER). I am nervous about taking this step as I am 54 and need to bridge the gap until I begin to receive the SSI supplemental at 56. Reading all your comments has helped me feel more at ease about this decision, I truly am sad to be leaving my route of 18 years but I have witnessed and experienced all that has been mentioned regarding the downfall of our service life via Management's folly. The USPS business model is unsound and there seems little that Postal Workers can do to effect a change in strategy. Frustration abounds. Asking carriers to just work harder, longer, faster, could be my 7 year old's business model. Even when management is shown by their own numbers how carriers can be more efficient working in safe but "unapproved" methods, they refuse to allow it. This has caused me/us to have ZERO faith in management's ability to guide us through these lean and changing times. I'll miss working with so many of my good brothers and sisters in mail, but it's time for me to go. Best of luck to you all, you DESERVE IT!

  • Reply to: Leveraging Postal Service Purchasing Power to Generate Revenue   4 years 10 months ago

    Mail volume down, the postal service should initiate a mail tax to be collected from business accepting payments online. They should reduce hours, combine routes, force central neighborhood delivery areas using apartment complex type boxes. one stop per neighborhood and then out.
    No Saturday mail. No union.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    I couldn't have said it better myself. There are too many administrators making sure you are "IN COMPLIANCE" for stupid things like making sure a checklist is filled out, or your clerk recited the sale spiel word for word. Yet when you have a problem you get passed around like a hot potato.

    Successful companies are run from the bottom up, not from the top down. We all know where the PS falls.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    If an Ebayer is using Priority boxes, they are supposed to be charged the Priority rate, regardless of how they intend to send it. There have been plenty of inverted tyvek envelopes that I marked postage due because I know the shipper was trying to pull a fast one.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    pretty good analogy

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    I agree with most everyone, especially Greg. What a joke on the T shirts. A total wate of money. And why are we spending money on the mystery shops. It can be done in house. It is just nonsense. Who are the people that are making these stupid decisions? Are they purposely trying to run the Postal Service into the ground, so they can justify closing post offices and cater only to the big mailers and coporations? just a thought. What happened to the actual purpose of the Postal Service? To provide service to our customers. And by the way do you know how much revenue is lost from the APCs, I would guess millions.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    The USPS just spend over a million dollars on t-shirts for employees to wear to work on Wednesdays to help promote Priority Mail Flat rate shipping. What a waste of money. Who will see these shirts if employees only wear them to work?

  • Reply to: Use of Industry Best Practices in Processing Parcels   4 years 10 months ago

    If everyone stopped smoking at the post office, the
    company would save million$ of Greenbacks in health
    & welfare alone. Hundreds of thousands of work hours
    could be saved. And in my humble estimate, manager
    performance would be increased by 22%/per day.
    ie. they could help do some work instead of wasting
    time smoking. Sick leave could nearly be eliminated
    saving more ca$h. And my health would be better because
    I wouldn't have to work extra to make up the time
    they lose on smoke breaks, and my health would
    improve because I won't be breathing 2nd hand & 3rd hand smoke.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    Careful on that line of thinking......Walmart has products and services that are NECESSARY and priced sensibly.
    The USPS is finding out that it is becoming more and more UNnecessary. And suppliers will NOT negotiate what s shaping up to be an ever accelerating downward spiral.

  • Reply to: Business Reply Mail   4 years 10 months ago

    I agree that you have great cause for complaint. I have forwarded your concerns and comments (including the yelp link) to the appropriate officials. I do not wish to leave specific names and telephone numbers on this post. However, if you send me your email address, I will forward you the information regarding the name and number of the station manager.
    Thank you

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    In conjunction with this subject, we are paying to much for rent also, and FSO seems to be their consistnatly obvilious selfs. Case in Point, in the Northern Illinois District we have one small building where we have been for 45 years. We are paying $38 a square foot, for a totally awful building without a dock. This building is 1.1 miles from next PO, that we own. The building right next to the existing PO, is about the size we currently rent, but is available for $25 a square foot. Other real estate is available for rent in town. Move the carriers to the Postal Owned building 1.1 miles away and lease a small retail space, if we need a retail space at all. This building is 1.1 miles from the south PO, and no more than 2.0 miles from the PO on the north side. Get the landlord to lower rent, or get out.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    As long as you have management not accountable, for just about everything they do. They are allowed to mismanage, that cost the Post Office 100's of millions of dollars every year, they give their selves bonus's even when they lose almost 3 trillion dollars. Most of the supervisors couldn't manage a little league baseball team. Until the USPS starts listening to all employees, the only way the USPS is going is DOWN.

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    Smart suppliers will decrease margins if at all possible. Getting/having a contract with USPS is attractive due to their guaranteed, timely payment... Walmart leverages it's presence to squeeze suppliers knowing they will do almost anything to get their products placed...USPS should do the same

  • Reply to: To Cut or Not to Cut: That's the Negotiating Question   4 years 10 months ago

    Depends on what the incentive is to the business' involved. I don't think "just be good guys and sell to us for less" is much of a strategy. Perhaps long term contracts with the business' involved or buying other products also from the business' involved. Why doesn't the postal service go to their customers and say we know how hard it is we're reducing the cost of a stamp from .44 to .40 cents. This is what the postal service is asking the business' they buy from to do. Rollin' On

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