• Reply to: A Look at India Post   4 years 9 months ago

    I think there is a fine balancing act. I do believe that the post office should be avaiable to all people within reasonable constraints. I remember hearing a NPR radio report in 2008 that talked about how the US was cutting off service to so very remote place that had no roads and the only way to get there was by private airplane. They paid $42 cents for a stamp but it cost the US Post Office $4,200 to deliver that one piece of mail. I also think since they have the infrastructure they can capitalize on it with other services as others talked about. This is more difficult that one might think espically because the culture and reward systems of new ventures is very different from the mindset of subsidized government run organization.

  • Reply to: A Look at India Post   4 years 9 months ago

    I second Roger to some extent, with the exception that Post should first clearly define what is its core business. One thing they should look at abroad is what is working for both public and private postal services. Lessons can be learned from examining FedEx. The merger of FedEx and Kinkos has now allowed FedEx to make itself into a broad communication center. You can go there not only to have traditional mailing services, but you can also fax, use the web, do word processing and graphics.

    All these services are essential to communication and are most likely lacking in rural parts of India. So if India Post can realign its core mission to be an enabler of communication in all its modern forms, then they can concentrate at delivering essential services to their customers and leave things that are wildly outside of their domain such as banking to agencies that are better equipped to handle such matters.

  • Reply to: A Look at India Post   4 years 9 months ago

    I would not agree that posts should focus on postal operations alone and not provide non-postal services like retail and financial services. As demand for letter delivery is diminishing due to increasing electronic diversion, especially in the developed world, an extensive postal network can be exploited to generate additional income from such non-postal activities.

  • Reply to: A Look at India Post   4 years 9 months ago

    The issue I see is that the Post in India is involved in auxialliary enterprises and most likely at the expense of improving the postal service. This seems to me to be much like the railways and airlines in Pakistan where the transport system gets worse but these transport sectors perform okay financially but it all comes from the auxialliary enterprises. The Post like other government corporations need to focus on their core business and leave the others stuff to others- private or public.

  • Reply to: A Look at India Post   4 years 9 months ago

    Same thing would happen here if there would be privitization. The private industry would take the cream off the top and ignore the hard to get to, less revenue producing areas. Do rural folks get cable tv? Nope, only the urbanites.

  • Reply to: Hollywood’s Take on the Postal Service   4 years 9 months ago

    CHANGE OUTER PERCEPTION FROM WITHIN.

    Postal Workers - ESPECIALLY MAIL CARRIERS - are the most pressured workers I've ever seen. They are timed, watched and regulated by (mostly) overzealous, micro managing, bonus-happy, discipline threatening supervisors. Their hard work goes completely ignored, marginalized and even disputed by their bosses on a daily basis. Still, they try to enjoy their work.

    With the current economic climate, failed Postal leadership, manipulation of Postal Unions and the enforcement of Pivoting (unpaid overtime) on thousands of workers across the country -- HOW DO YOU CHANGE THAT?

    The Postal Service needs to appreciate the workers. Without them there is no Postal Service.

    Hollywood thrives on stereotypes. Stereotypes are always 50 percent truth. There is no way around that. I wish there was.

  • Reply to: Neighborhood Mail   4 years 9 months ago

    I think that unaddressed mail is a bad idea for the USPS. It will destroy the value of advertising mail and fuel the fires of Do Not Mail Legislation.

  • Reply to: Neighborhood Mail   4 years 9 months ago

    Bad idea. Trends are to target and personlize more, not less. This practice would create more unwanted junk mail and there would be no way to have yourself removed from the list.

  • Reply to: What’s the Right Level of Financial Reporting?   4 years 9 months ago

    One problem is that under the new law some information that was formerly publicly available is now restricted. The Postal Service no longer even reveals the total volume and revenue for Priority Mail. This type of information should be made public.

  • Reply to: Neighborhood Mail   4 years 9 months ago

    I am a small business owner, and rather than walk around putting door hangers onto people's doors, I would rather pay the USPS to pop them into a mailbox.

  • Reply to: What’s the Right Level of Financial Reporting?   4 years 9 months ago

    The problem with blogs is everyone thinks they're an expert. The external reporting that the USPS does conforms to U.S. Generally Accepted Accouting Principles and is independently audited by Ernst & Young LLP. As a quasi-governmental entity, the Postal Service is required to provide more information than its private industry counterparts. However, to go overboard in this area would be a competitive disadvantage and provide the competition with information they should not have. Today's level of reporting is just right.

  • Reply to: What’s the Right Level of Financial Reporting?   4 years 9 months ago

    Financial accountability will not be accurate until the positions which should be accountable are held by independent, highly educated, mature employees who understand the meaning of commitment, integrity, and selflessness. While the upper level positions (which hold the majority of employees accountable financially) are filled through nepotism and favoritism, family members, alumni, and friends; the unqualified attempt to give the appearance of maintaining fiscal responsibility throughout the organization. Additionally, some financial control experts within the USPS consider themselves above the law, abusing their position of authority, thereby being unaccountable for their own actions which tend to absorb additional profit from the organization for their own personal interests. Investigate the financial control officers on a daily basis over time... you may find that they too waste time and money for personal gain. The accountability officers should also be held accountable. Upper level management has the ability to find ways to make money for personal gain at the expense of the USPS while professing fiscal responsibility. Look for those activities.

  • Reply to: Who We Are and Why We Blog...   4 years 9 months ago

    I heard a rumor that due to the bailout (one of the many billion-dollar bailouts) the USPS (OIG and IS included) is getting sub-compact cars that no one in the general public wants. And they are all the same color. These are all left-overs from 2009. It won't be too hard to see the OIG or IS investigators coming or watching someone (imagine 4 cars-all the same make, model and color... following a suspect). But I'm sure some bureacrat in DC will pat himself on the back for making this deal. Where's the leadership on this? In the dealership?

  • Reply to: What’s the Right Level of Financial Reporting?   4 years 9 months ago

    I work in the BMEU, and we have to make sure that every block on the postage statement submitted by the mailer is filled out, otherwise, it will not be recorded as revenue(even though we have collected it). A requirement, but nick-picky when it doesn't change anything about the acceptance of the mail. This is just another way for management to hide true revenue to bolster their position for wanting changes (reduction in staff, facility closures, etc.) without dealing with the real issues that are hindering the USPS.

  • Reply to: Neighborhood Mail   4 years 9 months ago

    Neighborhood mail could work for small churches and businesses needing to reach the community. However, some rules would need to be in place to insure it was cost effective for the Postal Service. First it would cost the same as regular mail no discount. The advantage for the customer is they can hit each house on the street. The Postal Service would provide a list of street and a number of stops each carrier makes to the business or church. The business would place a first class stamp on each piece and then divide the number of pieces by carrier and street. Example: CR 6 gets 200 letters for Ridge Ave. CR 7 gets 50 letters for Ridge Ave. That way if several carriers worked the same street it would not be a problem. Second the business would have to separate by carrier and street. As I said earlier they would bring a tray or sack for each carrier in that neighborhood with the number for each street. The requirement would be they must take it to the BMEU and then after approval they deliver it DDU style to the unit. The carriers would basically take out their flyers for the street and deliver house by house similar to what they do already. It is a win win for the customer and the post office.

  • Reply to: What’s the Right Level of Financial Reporting?   4 years 9 months ago

    The first place to save would be to stop wasting money on OIG Blogs

  • Reply to: Neighborhood Mail   4 years 9 months ago

    I think that Neighborhood Mail is bad idea because of privacy and environmental issues.

  • Reply to: What’s the Right Level of Financial Reporting?   4 years 9 months ago

    All of these reports cost a significant amount of money to prepare. Typical government response to a problem. Require a business entity to spend more money to report why they're not making more money. Obviously financial reports are needed and necessary. And not being in finance I'm not sure which reports are truly necessary. However, more is not always better. Rollin' On

  • Reply to: Hollywood’s Take on the Postal Service   4 years 9 months ago

    I've been a city letter carrier for 11 years now. I really enjoy my job. I can't go anywhere without running into someone I have met due to my job and different routes I have had. Most people do not understand that our job entails a whole lot more than just walking down the street putting paper into boxes. In many ways we become family to so many of our customers. I am amazed at what people will share with me about things going on in their lives.
    I have often thought that a day in the life of a letter carrier would make a great reality TV show. But, we need to be portrayed as we really are: hard working people who can help make a difference in so many people's lives.

  • Reply to: What’s the Right Level of Financial Reporting?   4 years 9 months ago

    Sirs, the real question is why is not already being done and what is there to hide ? Democracy and open government demand transparency from it's employees and the USPS is employed by the taxpayers and as such should be accountable to them in regards to operations as to avoid nasty surprises. In the past the Service has been substantially less than honest in their communications with Congress resulting in the creation of the OIG to monitor their truthfulness. It's remarkable that instead of replacing the officials responsible so as to ensure responsbile reporting Congress woud choose to create an agency to watch them. The management irresponsibility in their accuracy is epidemic in the USPS.

  • Reply to: What’s the Right Level of Financial Reporting?   4 years 9 months ago

    at the bulk center in NJ they run a Tour 2 on Sunday. When Tour 3 comes in there is no mail to work.
    This week they are drafting craft for thursday,Friday and Saturdat July 4. If they closed the 4th they could save a lot of money they would be paying out.Mail volume will be light so they could cut back thursday,Friday and close Saturday. Sunday is a regular work day and they could process all the mail.

    This would save a lot of overtime pay.

  • Reply to: What’s the Right Level of Financial Reporting?   4 years 9 months ago

    With all due respect, the 77 % of respondents who feel that the United States Postal Service does not disclose the appropriate amount or type of financial reporting information to the public either have not read the reams of reports submitted to the PRC or the United States Congress. These good folks simply do not understand postal or for that matter, any kind of financial reporting. In my thirty years in finance, I have never witness an organization that requires the amount of financial transparency as the USPS. There is no hidden money here folks. All is revenue booked and all expenses are recorded. The Financial Operating Stating is audited by the GAO, the accounting firm of Ernst and Young and yes, by are own OIG. Yes there are employee awards. And yes, there is travel that may or may not be needed and yes, there have been employees hired for salaried which would make the average 30 year clerk, carrier, manager, drool with envy . However with annual expenses in excess of 70 billion dollars a year, hiring a new IT guy for instance for 89K a year or flying someone on an unneeded trip from Washington to LA , or giving a clerk a 500 dollars award because thy never call in sick is not even going to scratch the surface of this colossal Postal budget. No, the real problem with USPS finances is too many employees making 50K plus per year. One way to solve this would be to adopted 5 day delivery and drastically reduce PTF hours. Remember, PTFs if not schedule are only guaranteed 4 hours per pay period. There are currently approximately 30 thousand PTFs and there are a lot of real savings in this area.

    Yes you can complain about Headquarters, the Areas and the districts to your hearts content but if all of these employees magically disappeared tomorrow, the company would still be bleeding red ink. A bad law (PAEA that restricts revenue coupled with an incredible decrease in volume and too many employees making too much money equals disaster. That is the real postal financial story.

    Yours respectably,

    Old Man Sam

  • Reply to: What’s the Right Level of Financial Reporting?   4 years 9 months ago

    USPS is all corrupted......You see that they have manager and supervisor with no college degree. In a real company, to be a supervisor or management, one would require atleast a Bachelor Degree or an MBA. None of the supervisor i know held any college degree whatsoever. this include the postmaster, and beyond the corrupted USPS. where can you find a non college educated who makes 70-100k a year???????

  • Reply to: What’s the Right Level of Financial Reporting?   4 years 9 months ago

    We cannot accurately determine the solution for fixing the financial situation for USPS until we fully understand the problem. A lot of managerial positions could be eliminated, consolidated, and re-purporsed saving USPS loads of money. Instead, management is directing wfr efforts at the very people that drive the USPS and put the mail in the box.

  • Reply to: What’s the Right Level of Financial Reporting?   4 years 9 months ago

    START BY USING PENS, NOT PENCILS AND TELL THE TRUTH AND NOT POSTAL MATH LIES THAT THOSE WHO ARE SUPPOSEDLY IN CHARGE CHANGE TO MAKE THEMSELVES LOOK GOOD...

    SIMPLE COMMON SENSE....T E L L T H E T R U T H!!!

    JFA

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