on Nov 19th, 2012 in Ideas Worth Exploring | 5 comments
 
Twenty years ago, when professional sporting teams started selling naming rights to their stadiums and arenas, many purists called it a low point in the commercialization of sports. But today, the number of arenas and ballparks not named after a corporate sponsor is small. For revenue-seeking team owners, it is just too hard to pass up the money that comes with selling your stadiums’ name. Strategy, business development and marketing all play huge factors in naming-rights deals, with top prices for these deals reaching about half a billion dollars, according to Sports Business Journal. As a business-centered organization looking to boost revenues, does the U.S. Postal Service have opportunities to sell naming rights? The idea of selling the naming rights to an entire Post Office might not be palatable to Congress, as lawmakers like to name post offices after fallen soldiers or local heroes. But what about selling space in parts of the Post Office? For example: this retail counter brought to you by XYZ Co.? Sides of vehicles or automated postal centers in high-traffic areas of retail centers could also hold valuable advertising space. With its national reach, yet local presence, the Postal Service is visible in every community nearly every day. Companies and nonprofit organizations would likely find the opportunities to reach such a large audience appealing. Another option might be to appropriate advertising space to other government agencies. For example, a state health department or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention could use space on postal vehicles or in retail lobbies to announce a public health campaign. The Department of Energy or local governments could use retail space to tout energy conservation practices to citizens. This approach would also tie in with a larger vision of using post offices to connect citizens with other government services. Would such offerings tarnish the Postal Service’s image and degrade what is still considered a public institution held in the public trust? Or should the Postal Service think creatively about new ways to use its large physical network? Would naming rights be an easy way to generate revenue in tough economic times? Or should the Postal Service focus on its core business?

5 Comments

Instead of canvassing the PO with ads is not a great idea, what about leasing space for ATM machines or installing a proprietary network of ATMs with agreements with major and local banks. Or just enter the banking sector providing retail banking, like many postal networks part of UPU around the world. Over 31000 locations nationwide is more far reaching than most retail oriented organizations.

What about advertising on our uniform shirts like the pro golf tour does?

They should either advertise or sell adverting space on the thousands of leased and highway contract trailers currently crisscrossing the country.

In 2000-2001 as Manager, Standard Mail & Periodicals, I also managed the Postal Advertising Network (PAN) that used the Postal Service's assets to sell advertising space. Those assets made advailable for advertising included but was not limited to: retail lobbies; the sides of delivery vehicles; banners on the sides of building/facilities, etc. At that time we were looking to expand the assets available. The first ad sell was to America Online on 10,000 delivery vehicles nationwide. Another company was Replacements.com. Unfortunately, this program was not fully embraced within the Postal Service, was ahead of its time and was discontinued as we were making inroads to advertising budgets of companies. This program should be expanded and is an outstanding opportunity for the Postal Service to utilize it assets for revenue generation.

At a minimum, I would love to see advertisements of Postal Service products on all leased and highway contract trailers currently crisscrossing the country.

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