on Oct 11th, 2010 in Finances: Cost & Revenue | 7 comments
 
PostalOne!® is a web-based system designed to facilitate business mail processing and allows the Postal Service to electronically collaborate with business mail customers. It is also used to streamline the mail acceptance and postage payment process. Mailers can either submit a paper postage statement (a summary of items mailed showing postage) or use one of three electronic formats. •Mail.dat® •Mail.XML •Postal Statement Wizard (PSW). Mailers may qualify for Intelligent Mail Barcode (IMb) discounts when they submit postage statements electronically using Mail.dat or Mail.XML. The Mail.XML submission method supports near real time validation of mailing data as well as compatibility with current ecommerce technology. Mailers can also enter mailing information, such as type and quantity of items mailed into the PostalOne! system over the Internet using Postal Statement Wizard. Both Mail.dat and Mail.XML submissions have increased in recent years. In June 2010, over half of all postage statements were submitted electronically, and of those, 89% were submitted using Mail.dat. That’s a sharp contrast from the beginning of the fiscal year, when 78% of business mail postage statements were submitted in hardcopy format. While electronic postage statement processing is a promising tool for making the Postal Service more efficient, it still faces issues: Does the cost of mailer software development and upgrade offset IMb discounts? Are rejected electronic postage statement files processed timely? Does it help the Postal Service to collect all its revenue? What do you think of businesses submitting and postal employees accepting business mail postage statements electronically? Is electronic postage statement submission a boon or a bust? More information on this project can be found on our Audit Projects page. This topic is hosted by the OIG's Cost, Revenue & Rates audit team.

Comments

Mailers benefit because it's easier for them to rip the Postal Service off.

very good article

As many problems that PostalOne has with "outages", I do not think going paperless is a totally good idea. What about audits and Sox Compliance? One audit that SHOULD be persued: The IT dept that is in charge of "PostalOne." Why so many outages and problems all of the time? Could this be their way of creating "job security?" Hmmmmm!

As long as PostalOne! is working. I agree, PostalOne! has too many interruptions and some outages. Unfortunately, the USPS revenue completeness process relies very heavily on PostalOne!. IG conducted a review of Feb. 2010 PostalOne! Outage.

As long as clerks are thoroughly checking the completeness and accuracy of statements sent electronically. The same would hold true for those submitted manually--although BMA encourages electronically submitted statements.

N/A. I am an auditor.

The article says everything about this new technology of sending paperless mails however, one thing I am still curious to know is about the security aspects. How are these guys ensure that my data remains confidential and in integrity.

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