• on Apr 11th, 2011 in Ideas Worth Exploring | 31 comments
    [dropcap style="font-size: 60px; color: #9b9b9b;"]L[/dropcap]ast year Americans spent $155.2 billion in online shopping. This year they are projected to spend more than $190 billion. The delivery of these parcels and packages represent a large revenue opportunity for the U.S. Postal Service, especially if they can improve delivery times, package tracking and increase processing through automation and new technologies. One solution may be the use of radio frequency identification (RFID). Currently, the Postal Service uses barcode systems to manually track and scan packages. A RFID tracking system uses radio waves to transmit and track identifiable information about an object, which has a unique tag embedded with a microchip and an antenna. The chip could store product or shipment information, such as the sender’s and receiver’s addresses, package contents, or other relevant information.The technology would allow for greater automation of parcels/packages, reducing delivery time and allowing mailers to track and even recall/reroute packages with greater ease. Instead of relying on human scanning – as the current barcode system does – RFID would use electronic readers to capture data on tags and transmit it directly to a computer system. The RFID system would require significant outlay for a new infrastructure as well as the cost of the tags themselves. The investment ultimately could result in lower costs and improved mail delivery times, making the Postal Service the premier delivery service. This blog is hosted by the Office of Audit, Delivery Directorate.
  • on Apr 4th, 2011 in Labor | 13 comments
    Consumer needs for postal services are changing quickly resulting in the U. S. Postal Service developing a plan to right size the workforce. New Postmaster General and CEO Pat Donahoe announced on March 24 that the Postal Service plans to enact the Reduction in Force (RIF) and Voluntary Early Retirement (VER) processes with the goal of eliminating 7,500 administrative, supervisory, and postmaster positions. Additionally, the Postal Service will cut the number of vice president level officers by 16 percent and eliminate the senior vice president position. Since 2007, the Postal Service has sponsored a number of recruitment and retention initiatives. One initiative identified critical needs in finance, supply management and engineering. Other efforts included the revamping of the Corporate Succession Planning process and the formation of a Leadership Development and Talent Management group in Human Resources. As the Postal Service continues to right size, one question remains: How can it develop a strategy to retain needed talents and attract new ones for its future, especially in a time when it is focusing on cost cutting? What does the Postal Service need to do to retain, develop, and attract future workers? Let us know what you think!
  • on Mar 28th, 2011 in Delivery & Collection | 57 comments
    [dropcap style="font-size: 60px; color: #9b9b9b;"]L[/dropcap]ast Thursday the Postal Regulatory Commission (PRC) issued its advisory opinion on the U. S. Postal Service’s proposal to switch to five-day delivery. Following a year-long analysis, the PRC voiced concerns with the request, questioning the potential savings, the impact on service, and the effect on communities, especially in rural areas. However, the Commission was unable to reach a consensus and did not issue an opinion to endorse or reject the proposal to cut Saturday delivery. The Postal Service responded with a statement from the Postmaster General, reiterating that five-day delivery is a core element of the Postal Service’s strategy for the future. The statement also said the Postal Service will continue to press its case before Congress, which has the authority to change delivery requirements. Do you think the Postal Service has a case for five-day delivery? Although 5-day delivery is a key element of the Postal Service's future plans, there are many other options under consideration at this point in time. In your mind, what do you think are the most important options? Give your comments below. Note: The U.S. Governement Accountability office just released its own report on 5-day delivery. This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).

     

     

     

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