• on Nov 8th, 2010 in Products & Services | 19 comments
    The Post Office isn’t the only place to shop for mailing services. Postal Service customers can purchase products and services at postal stores and other facilities, and on-line at USPS.com. They can also call 1-800-ASK-USPS, to get answers to their questions and address their needs. Some of the more popular customer services options available are: •Finding a Zip Code™. •Shipping products and services. •Scheduling a pickup. •Locating a Post Office™. •Tracking and confirming shipments. •Changing addresses. •Getting information on delivery services. Are www.usps.com and 1-800-ASK-USPS useful, easy-to-use tools for customers? Could improvements make the tools more user-friendly? Let us know what you think of the customer service tools that are available. Are there additional products and/or services you would like to see added to www.usps.com or 1-800-ASK-USPS? This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Office of Audit Information Technology team.
  • on Nov 2nd, 2010 in Ideas Worth Exploring | 7 comments
    In a world where speed is everything, a new product is becoming popular that takes it s-l-o-w. It’s called Future Mail. In China, several companies are offering to deliver mail as slowly as you want, — even weeks, months, or years into the future. No time machine necessary! Some customers are using Future Mail to send letters to their future selves, others use it to be sure their anniversary, birthday, or holiday greetings will arrive exactly on time. Future Mail customers simply fill out, address their cards, letters, or packages, and specify the date they want them delivered. These new companies will make it happen. One can even purchase gifts and flowers to be sent in the future. When signing up for the service, customers are assessed a fee depending on how long the company has to hold on to the deliverables. Customers must also provide current contact information, in case their item is undeliverable in the future. Once the letter or package is handed over, the company tucks it away in a safe place until the date selected comes around. Though some customers have concerns about what happens to their packages if the companies fail, the service continues to catch on. This unique service may prove to be a new revenue stream for the U.S. Postal Service. Do you think there will be a market for Future Mail here? This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).
  • on Oct 25th, 2010 in Strategy & Public Policy | 8 comments
    A recent consumer study released by Epsilon Targeting shows direct mail is still important to us. As a method to advertise goods and services, direct mail plays a major role in many consumer decisions — especially among young adults. The market research firm conducted a survey of adults in more than 4,700 U.S. and Canadian households, looking at their preferences among the traditional and new media channels for obtaining information. The survey confirmed findings from 2008, which noted that consumers are using a larger number of media, with their choices influenced by factor, such as convenience, trust, depth of content, and the “green factor.” The survey indicated younger consumers not only found direct mail to be more trustworthy than other channels, including online, but also found that it was the preferred channel for obtaining information. In the 14 consumer categories covered in the survey, American respondents in the 18-34 year age bracket preferred mail as an information source by a wide margin in almost every category, except travel. Although there’s little doubt e-mail and social networking have found a way into the marketing mix, the findings of this study show that direct mail and other “offline” media still play a role with consumers across every age. Does direct mail still play a role in your shopping choices? Let us know! This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).

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