• on Dec 27th, 2010 in Post Offices & Retail Network | 7 comments
    It’s a couple days after Christmas and all through the house, still no creatures are stirring. Well, some of us are. After all, it’s back to work for most of us. Postal employees were especially busy this time of year. In the holiday season, the Postal Service delivered nearly 16 billion cards, letters and packages across the country and sent mail around the world. Post Office lobbies were also a busy place, with 97 million customers visiting. But more than 47 million customers skipped the trip to the Post Office this holiday season and took advantage of the Postal Service’s online shipping at www.usps.com. The Postal Service touches everyone regularly, but even more so during the holiday season. We would like to hear about your “Mail Moment” experience with the Postal Service over the past few weeks. What made it memorable? Was it a positive experience? If not, how can the Postal Service improve?
  • on Dec 20th, 2010 in Finances: Cost & Revenue | 1 comment
    The Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act (PAEA) requires the Postal Service to measure service performance and report to the Postal Regulatory Commission (PRC). The PAEA directs that external measurement systems be used for evaluating the Postal Service’s mail delivery performance unless alternate systems have been approved by the PRC. The PRC reviews this data to ensure that delivery performance does not deteriorate under the current rate setting process and to assess customer satisfaction. The Postal Service has approval to use a hybrid measurement system for bulk presorted First-Class and Standard Mail® relying on Intelligent Mail Barcode (IMb) scans to measure arrival at postal facilities (start the clock) and a network of external reporters who record delivery times. The PRC has expressed concern about the accuracy of start-the-clock recordings, noting that Postal Service’s start-the-clock event was based on the first read on mail processing equipment rather than on the documented arrival time. Given limited data availability, the PRC also expressed concern that the IMb service delivery performance measurement is not representative of all presort First-Class and Standard mail. They also recommended the Postal Service continue to work to correct service problems. The Postal Service implemented full-service IMb mailer certification procedures to ensure that mailings meet appropriate business rules. However, this certification process is not mandatory. Do you think that the mailer certification procedures will increase the availability and accuracy of start-the-clock data? Have you experienced problems with the certification procedures? Are there other steps the Postal Service can take to ensure the reliability of IMb-based service performance data? You are also invited to comment on this topic on our Audit Project Pages. The topic is hosted by the Office of Audit Cost, Revenue, and Rates team.
  • on Dec 13th, 2010 in Finances: Cost & Revenue | 35 comments
      The Postal Service does not receive tax dollars to sustain its operations, but relies on accurate postage payments for support. While the vast majority of the Postal Service’s customers pay the full cost of mailing, revenue loss, otherwise known as revenue leakage, can occur when individual or business customers don’t pay the appropriate postage for their mailings. Postage may be paid in a number of ways. Customers can buy stamps at a customer service window and apply them to letters and packages as they need them, which can sometimes lead to underpayment of postage. Business customers can pay through meter or permit accounts. Business Mail Entry Units make sure that the correct postage has been affixed or claimed when discounts are claimed. Online sellers can use PC Postage and Click-N-Ship® postage with free carrier pick-up, eliminating the hassle of taking their goods to the Post Office to be weighed and shipped. Of course, this could lead to mistakes in mailings sent out under the wrong, and cheaper, mailing class for which the goods do not apply, such as mailing a set of skis as media mail. Because of its dire financial situation, it’s now more important than ever for the Postal Service to protect the revenue it is due whether it comes in from the post office window, meters, online postage accounts, or from permit accounts. Now is the time to share your thoughts and help the agency get back in the black. What are the best ways to protect Postal Service revenue? Enter your comments below. The Office of Audit Sales and Service team is hosting this topic.

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