on Oct 18th, 2013 in Strategy & Public Policy | 1 comment
 

Last month, the U.S. Postal Service awarded the contract for a pilot program for a cloud-based identity management system called the Federal Cloud Credential Exchange (FCCX). Using a closed communications network, or "digital pipelines", the Postal Service will deliver digital packets ("envelopes") of secure identity data between government agencies and private or public identity providers. The idea is that a person could use an identity from one of many providers, such as a financial institution or utility, to access different government websites, as long as the identity met a required level of security. This should be far more convenient than logging in to separate services with multiple identities and passwords.

Government and identity provider participants in FCCX have not been finalized. But the Veterans Administration is on board, and other potential participants, such as the Internal Revenue Service, Department of Education, and Social Security Administration, have been working with the Postal Service on the requirements and standards for the pilot.

Once the digital pipelines have been established, they can be applied to a number of processes that require secure communications. For example, the Internet of Things, the networked interconnection of everyday objects, may include high-risk communications, such as between medical monitors and medication dispensers, mobile payment sites and financial institutions, or electric meters and power companies. The Postal Service recognizes the potential value of playing an enabling role and has made a move to secure a position in the digital world. Nextgov.com reports that the Postal Service has recently filed for a number of digitally oriented trademarks to cover services in data encryption, secure communications, and electronic document management.

What do you think? Can the Postal Service bring greater security and privacy to online communications and transactions?

1 Comments


How secure can online communications be anyway? Anytime you bring identifying information online it can and will be hacked at some point! No matter the amount of security one thinks exist, it will always be broken, there is always a backdoor. Nothing is secure!!! Even the Postal Service can't maintain the security and privacy of PII or PCI information confidently for a long time. The US government is hacked quite often, if not daily. Now US citizens PII or PCI data will be brought into the mix? Not a good idea!!!

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