on Nov 15th, 2010 in OIG | 14 comments
 
Pushing the Envelope was launched in the late Fall of 2008. Since then, we have posted 118 topics (including this one) and received more than 3,800 comments from our readers. Topics covering issues of interest to Postal Service employees generated the greatest response. Our top five, by views, include the following: 1)Silly Rules 2)OIG wants to know how you feel about sick leave 3)Nationwide Wage Uniformity 4)Brainstorm Ideas part 2 (allowed people to choose the best idea) 5)Brainstorm Ideas to Help the Postal Service However, all topics, even less popular ones, have helped to generate a great deal of discussion with the following topics generating the most debate and the most comments: 1)Brainstorm Ideas to Help the Postal Service 2)The Great Debate 3)Silly Rules 4)Does the Postal Service Need to Re-examine Its Delivery Service Standards? This feedback has generated strong debate on the blog and sometimes in the greater postal community. In fact, two recent audits from the OIG’s office, “Postal Service Area and District Office Field Structure” and “Stations and Branches Optimization and Consolidation Initiative,” incorporate reader comments from their related blogs. The Postal Service continues to evolve to meet its current challenges, and fiscal year 2011 could be a very significant year for postal issues. Pushing the Envelope will be there to ask questions, generate ideas, and keep on pushing that envelope. As we emerge from our terrible twos into our third year, the contributors and editors hope you will continue to respond. We’d like to hear your views on what you want from this blog. What do you like? What would you like us to change? What topics should we cover next? Let us know what you think and keep commenting! This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).
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Comments

is there anyone who sells discounted uniforms. $288 for a raincoat with the discount, $70 for pants? really? with my allotment this year, i was able to get shoes, raincoat and gloves. i desperately need pants but after the raincoat purchase, i couldn't afford them. my pants are clearly worn and have holes in them, the belt loops are torn off; how bout some reinforcement there since i hang my keys off them. keeping up appearances is important too. would you do business with someone who was dressed in clothes with holes. let's look at a new uniform designer.

Carriers continue having OVERTIME now a days...Why USPS have carrier TE's wherein part time clerks & mailhandlers working 4 hours only with full benefits paid by USPS. To make this benefits worth it, USPS should convert these PTF into carrier position and eliminate the TE's.

When you have stressful working environment, you will have unhappy employees....annual & sick leave will be use frequently

Maybe some of the management should wear uniforms too?
At very least they should wear a name tag identifying who they are, and what their function at the organization is.

According to the 10K Report published yesterday that
I started to read, something better change....

I had two ahem, bosses come walking past the dock where I was unloading mail a few months ago. Not a mail handler in sight. (shift change, I guess?) When I pushed the wire cage off to the dock, I exclaimed to them, "little help pal?"!

The one dude looked at me like I spoke Arabic....
And, kept walking away while both glared at me like I committed a mortal sin.

In the real world, like most business's,
everyone helps. It's not like I was asking them to
hook up a 440 electric line.

Congrats to the OIG on making it past the terrible 2's. Good luck and good hunting in year 3.

Just curious, has anything been done in the last 2 years as a result of this blog? Cost savings, service improvement either now or in the future? I have seen this blog cited in your annual reports,so I was just wondering.

The Postal Service clearly does not get anywhere near the appreciation that it deserves. Trillions of letters and parcels have been delivered and people simply take it all for granted. Human nature I guess.

Here's an idea worth exploring: consider EASE OF USE for your services. I'm a long time customer and really a fan of the USPS in most cases. Yourt run of the mill services are great. However, I'll tell you frankly that my main problem with the USPS has nothing to do with the fees charged, or the quality of service from the employees. The problems I see are all ones that originate at upper management levels or imposed by legislation.

My main beef is with ease of use, or rather LACK thereof of the USPS services. I'm a small time dealer in rare books. So I use the USPS frequently. The labyrinthine regulations and rate structures drive me batty. After all these years I still can't tell for certain before walking in to my post office which customs forms to use for which parcels. Nor can I tell for certain how much it will cost -- your on-line calculator is next to useless for anything complex. I can tell you how many times I've walked into my post office and been given a price much higher or lower than what I calculated on-line. I don't care that much about the money, but rather about the predictability.

Now let's consider the priority mail problem. I can recall back when I used to be able to buy a single stamp that was good for a small USPS box domestically. I could buy these stamps and know that one would be good for a box less than two pounds shipped anywhere in the US. Can I do that now? No way.

Then there is the whole come to the post office to mail any damned little parcel issue. I know what it says on the mail boxes, but the rule makers missed the boat on that one totally. Wake up. They caught the Unabomber. Why should we all still have to suffer? It's the USPS version of airport body cavity searches.

EASE OF USE, people. That is the name of the game. You don't have it. You used to, but it's long gone.

Oh, and the USPS Postal Inspectors? They are a joke. They have the time and resources hassle PMB services. Yet they can't catch the people who stole one of my rare books from inside a USPS facility in California a few years back. Lay them off. They are useless drains on your resources.

Oh, and the rate hikes everyone gripes about: just give us one big one instead of half a dozen little ones every year or so. Make them in 5 or 10 cent intervals or whatever so they are easy to calculate and easy to use stamps with.

Remember, this is from someone who LIKES the USPS. That's all I can think of today, but there is a lot more.

Have a nice day.

You are certainly right about those rate hikes. They are always 1 or 2 cents and the stamp prices never end in a 0 or a 5. I believe that the Postal Rates Commission has something to do with this.

I realy like the USPS I would like to be a partner

The exchange rate is changing all the time and, in order for many

people to make use of certain services, they need to be aware of

these changes. If you work in an industry where foreign currency,

such as the dollar, affects your income then you will want to pay

careful attention to the exchange rate.

-----------------
pauldavis

Dollars to Pounds

Here is an idea. It is rumored that the USPS is close to signing a contract with Diebold Security to take over the changing of customer locks. For this service Diebold is going to charge the USPS $38 per lock with additional mileage charges. We currently charge customers $30 to change a lock. At this price we are losing money, we should get out of the lock changing business. But instead of turning to Diebold,(are they going to charge us and then we charge the customer?) shouldn't we get out of owning CBUs. Why aren't our postmasters allowed to tell customers that the USPS will no longer supporting CBUs and that the customers housing associations should either take over the existing CBUs or provide individual mailboxes?

Why are so many of the USPS buildings leased? The amount of rent that the USPS pays each month is amazing. Is it because powerful forces in Washington believe that private business should always get a cut of government income? Or is it because if the USPS owns the property, then the Federal Government pays no property tax to the local government. But if the USPS leases the property, then the property owner has to pay property tax?

I went to our window services this morning to send a Birthday card. I looked around and didn't see any Gift Card selection. There were only American Express cards and they have a $3.95 charge in addition to the amount placed into them. (By the way.....25 yrs ago I put in a suggestion to Hdqtrs to put Cards in our lobby's. I was thrilled to see someone catch on 25 yrs later. Really excited. I wondered if I was always just a bit "outlandish" with my ideas. Apparently, not!)

How about getting some Restaurants (Chili's, Red Lobster, etc.. ) stores (Walmarts, Costco, Target...) coffee and/or donut shop Gift Cards in our lobbies??? I would have bought one in a "heartbeat" today. When I go to grocery stores and they offer a huge variety of Gift Cards it's convenient. We have to change so we can draw business to us in a very convienent way.

I would like to also see.......Wrapping being done in some of the larger major Plant Window Services. Men and Women alike would pay $5.00 on up........for this to be performed based on the size of the parcel. I use to shop at the stores when I had the chance to have them wrap and I was in a hurry.

The USPS has to think outside that BOX.

I'm a woman who works and can't always get those things, above, accomplished during peak periods. I'm not alone with this situation. Think a customer and we can bring those needed services to our USPS customers and win them back. We can also become profitable.

Thanks for this "forum".

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