• on Feb 22nd, 2010 in Mail Processing & Transportation | 18 comments
    The Postal Service uses forklifts to move mail in its mail processing facilities. To improve efficiency and cut the costs associated with using this equipment, the U.S. Postal Service purchased a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-based tracking system called the Powered Industrial Vehicle Management System (PIVMS). Features of the system that help productivity include weight sensing, real-time location of vehicles, two-way messaging, driver authentication and maintenance scheduling. Features that increase safety include impact accountability, facilitating Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) compliance as well as speed and impact sensing. The Postal Service has deployed the PIVMS in 114 facilities at a cost of more than $35 million to • Reduce work hours used to transport mail and equipment throughout the plant. • Reduce work hours needed to maintain the fleet of Powered Industrial Vehicles (PIVs). • Eliminate unauthorized use of PIVs. • Reduce injuries from unsafe operation of PIVs. • Reduce damage to mail and equipment from unsafe operation of PIVs. • Reduce the number of pieces of equipment needed to perform this work. Pushing the Envelope is interested in hearing from those experienced in using the PIVMS. Has the PIVMS lived up to its expectations? How do its benefits compare to its costs? What do you think about PIVMS?
     
    This topic is hosted by the OIG's Network Processing directorate.
  • on Feb 8th, 2010 in Strategy & Public Policy | 23 comments
    Courtesy of Apple

    Last August, Pushing the Envelope ran a topic on e-readers — devices designed for portable book reading. Two weeks ago, Apple unveiled the iPad. The iPad offers multiple functionality including the ability to read books, surf the Internet, and use computer applications. Unlike most e-readers, the iPad does not have virtual ink technology, which is intended to mimic paper and make reading more pleasant, but it has one key difference from other widely-used e readers — a color display.

    Newspapers and magazines have particularly expressed interest in a portable device that would electronically display their content in color. They hope to sell electronic versions of their traditional product — stories and advertisements that are easy to read anywhere. Is the iPad the answer? Will magazines and newspapers migrate to color devices like the iPad? What about catalogs? If people can easily read, view, and order items from a computer tablet on their couch, will retailers start sending digital catalogs? Or is the immediacy of receiving a physical paper catalog irreplaceable? What do you think? This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).

  • on Aug 3rd, 2009 in Strategy & Public Policy | 18 comments
    It wasn’t too long ago that digital audio players such as iPods and MP3s revolutionized the music industry. Now, almost a decade later, the same sort of revolution is occurring in the publishing industry with the introduction of electronic reading devices such as the Amazon Kindle and Sony Reader. Electronic reading devices allow users to download digital versions of books, newspapers, and magazines. The devices are mobile, and some offer wireless capabilities. Now, newspaper and magazine publishers have another option besides the Postal Service to reach customers. Will electronic reader technology become a more effective method to deliver newspapers and magazines? Will this technology be the answer for the survival of newspaper and magazine publishers or the demise of the mail house and printing industry? A recent study stated the number of business to business publications offering digital editions and total subscriptions have increased over 300 percent from 2006 to 2007. In addition, consumer publications offering digital editions and total subscriptions have increased over 200 percent from 2005 to 2007. However, Periodicals mail volume has steadily declined since 2000, and for the past few years, the Postal Service’s Periodicals class revenue has failed to cover its costs. The electronic reader option offers newspaper and magazine publishers a less expensive way to reach readers. In addition to the thousands of digital books available for download, today electronic reader users can buy monthly subscriptions to The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and other major newspapers all for around $10 a month. These publications can be downloaded automatically to the electronic reader overnight, so at breakfast, it's available to read. Some electronic readers require synching and downloading using a personal computer, while others offer wireless downloads. Electronic reader technology also provides the ability to cut, paste, and email articles, and to clarify words through built-in dictionaries, which makes the electronic reader more compelling as a news delivery mechanism. The technology is still being developed but in the future could possibly include color and touch screen interaction. The technology also saves paper, although it consumes electricity. Right now, the only drawback is the price; electronic readers sell for about $299 to $500. So what do you think?
    1. Do you think the Postal Service’s Periodicals mail volume will be further reduced by electronic reader technology? What about other types of publications such as catalogs?
    2. At the current prices, would you purchase one of the electronic readers?
    3. If you own an electronic reader, do you subscribe to a newspaper or magazine?
    4. Would you subscribe to a newspaper or magazine if you owned an electronic reader?
    5. Is there a way the Postal Service can use electronic reader devices to its benefit to increase revenue?

    This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).

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