• on Sep 26th, 2011 in Ideas Worth Exploring | 9 comments
    The Postal Service has “coupled” its retail and delivery operations, both managerially and physically, since delivery services were first established almost 150 years ago. Historical patterns, or the needs for delivery service efficiencies, primarily determined the location of physical facilities, which typically house both delivery and retail operations. Demands for postal retail services are changing both geographically and demographically as consumers age and population centers shift. Our Risk Analysis Research Center studied the strategic concept of “decoupling” the Postal Service’s delivery and retail operations, examining both the physical and managerial functions. The results appear in the recently released whitepaper titled Retail and Delivery: Decoupling Could Improve Service and Lower Costs. The white paper draws upon the insights of key stakeholders, private sector delivery companies within the United States, foreign postal operators, and expert business consultants. The study found that selective decoupling of retail and delivery operations, mostly outside of rural areas, could result in lower costs, increased revenue, and better service that is more responsive to changing market conditions and diverse customer needs. The paper’s key findings include:
    • A decoupling strategy affords the Postal Service more flexibility to respond to changing customer needs for retail service.
    • The Postal Service too often ignores retail functions, which receive secondary managerial attention when competing with delivery for resources and clerk time.
    • Decoupling could help transform both retail and delivery into separate best-practices driven, strategic business units.
    • Major private-sector delivery companies in the United States as well as foreign posts previously separated their retail and delivery functions with each having its own distinct skills, training, and performance measures.
    Tell us your thoughts in the comment section below. This blog is hosted by the OIG’s Risk Analysis Research Center.