• on Oct 25th, 2013 in OIG | 0 comments

    On July 26, 1775, all you needed to deliver the mail was a strong back and a fast horse. In 2013, the tools required to move 40 percent of the world’s mail sound more at home in science fiction. Robots, supercomputers, 23 petabytes of digital storage (that’s 24,117,248 Gigabytes), and one of the world’s largest computer networks help deliver letters and parcels across the globe. Like any organization of its size and profile, the Postal Service regularly sees malicious activity directed at its network. The Office of Inspector General's Computer Crimes Unit (CCU) works closely with the Postal Service's Corporate Information Security Office to investigate and prosecute threats to Postal Service networks and information resources.




    Information security is a shared responsibility and we need your help to keep the Postal Service network secure. So as we close out National Cyber Security Awareness Month, we share some simple steps that go a long way toward improving security:

    • Keep a clean computer – keep your anti-virus, operating system, and software programs updated. Many attacks exploit vulnerabilities in unpatched systems that could be prevented simply by keeping current with updates.
    • Be wary of emails and websites soliciting personal information or login credentials, even if they look real. Also be suspicious of unexpected emails, especially those with attachments.
    • Use strong passwords – good passwords use a mix of upper and lowercase letters, and numbers and symbols. Use different passwords for each of your accounts
    • For our customers, beware of bogus package delivery notification messages and Change of Address websites. Find out about these schemes and how to avoid becoming a victim on the Postal Inspection Service's (https://postalinspectors.uspis.gov/pressroom/schemealerts.aspx) page.
    • For Postal employees and contractors, please stay vigilant and report suspected security incidents or suspicious activity immediately to the Computer Incident Response Team at USPSCIRT[at]usps[dot]gov or call 866-USPS-CIRT (866-877-7247).

    For more information on how to stay safe online, visit http://www.staysafeonline.org/.

    We’re here to support our Postal Service customers around the clock and can be reached via the OIG main number at 703-248-2100. You can also report security incidents to us online via the OIG Hotline or at 888-USPS-OIG (888-877-7644).

    We welcome your input on information security. If you are a business, how do you educate your employees and customers about the importance of information security? Consumers and employees, are there ways the Postal Service could strengthen their systems? 

  • on Oct 15th, 2012 in Finances: Cost & Revenue | 1 comment
    The U.S. Postal Service spent $12.3 billion on supplies and services in FY 2011, which made up about 17 percent of its total operating expenses. Suppliers to the Postal Service range from large integrators, such as FedEx and UPS, to individuals responsible for cleaning offices and transporting mail between postal locations. With thousands of suppliers, the Postal Service needs a procurement process that is agile, yet transparent and secure. When the Postal Reorganization Act created a self-supporting Postal Service, it exempted it from many federal purchasing laws, including the Federal Acquisition Regulation, which most other federal agencies must follow. Since then, the Postal Service’s purchasing policies have gone through many changes and iterations in an effort to follow the procurement developments of the private sector, streamline its acquisition process, and reduce purchasing costs. In 2005, the Postal Service implemented the Supplying Principles and Practices, which are not legally binding and allow it to make purchasing decisions based on best value rather than rigid factors. Postal contracting officials have much greater discretion than their counterparts at other federal agencies. The streamlined process was designed to create a more efficient businesslike approach, but it has also opened the door for potential problems, especially in the area of non-competitive contract awards. A 2010 audit by the Office of Inspector General on the Postal Service’s noncompetitive contracts said the Postal Service needed to put in additional controls to make sure its interests are protected. Among the suggestions were to strengthen oversight of noncompetitive contracting, maximize competition, and avoid any potential conflicts of interest. The streamlining of purchasing procedures also created a new process for resolving supplier disagreements. Previously, suppliers filed disagreements with the Postal Service’s general counsel and decisions could be appealed to a federal court. Under the new process, suppliers file disagreements with a Postal Service manager, designated as the supplier disagreement resolution official, whose decisions are final and cannot be appealed by the supplier. Do you think streamlining of the purchasing procedures has positively or negatively affected the Postal Service? What is working particularly well in the current procurement process? What could be improved? Should the Postal Service follow procurement developments of the private sector, or should it be required to follow more federal procurement rules? Share your thoughts below.
  • on May 30th, 2011 in OIG | 8 comments
    au-dit (noun) - a methodical examination and review What is the U.S. Postal Service Office of Inspector General Office of Audit? We’re a team of auditors and evaluators helping to maintain the integrity and accountability of America’s Postal Service, its revenue and assets, and its workforce. We do this by conducting independent audits and reviews of the Postal Service. Each year we develop an audit plan with projects focusing on the perceived risks facing the Postal Service. We also include projects that address stakeholders’ concerns. The overarching goal of our audits is to provide Postal Service management with information on how to best address the challenges they are facing. Why do we blog? To put it simply – we blog to get your ideas on how to make the Postal Service better! We look at our blog as a “virtual think tank” where Postal Service employees, customers, and stakeholders can present their thoughts and solutions for a more efficient and effective Postal Service. We’ve received a wealth of information that has helped us with our audits and has given us ideas for future work. How can you help? Let us know what you think! •What are some critical challenges facing the Postal Service that you would like to see us explore through our audits? •What could the Postal Service do to improve its service to you? •What could the Postal Service do to increase its revenues or reduce its costs? •What other ideas do you have? Would you like to learn more about us? Please visit Reading Room section our website where you can review our published reports to Postal Service management as well as our semiannual reports to Congress or just learn more about us. We also welcome your comments on our upcoming audits and reviews, which we feature on our Audit Projects page. If you have an audit idea and do not see anything related there, please submit your idea to auditprojects[at]uspsoig[dot]gov The Office of Audit’s Audit Operations team is hosting this topic.

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