• on Sep 24th, 2012 in Delivery & Collection | 3 comments
    The U.S. Postal Service recently reported that its third quarter delivery service performance results marked “all-time record service performance” across all mail categories. In particular, the Postal Service had significant improvement in delivery performance for its commercial mail products in First Class and Standard Mail. Periodicals’ on-time performance topped 80 percent for the first time since 2010, a major improvement over the 46 percent score from earlier this year. The improved service performance in the third quarter occurred while the Postal Service was in the process of consolidating 46 facilities, which some mailers feared would affect service. But initial reports suggest service has not been overtly disrupted by the consolidations, although the real test could come during the fall and holiday mailing seasons. The Postal Service recently completed this first phase of its network rationalization plan, and is now on a break from consolidation until 2013 after the election season. Postal officials have attributed the improvement in service performance to diagnostic tools that show “pinch points” and help managers to act on that information to reduce cycle times. The Intelligent Mail Barcode full-service data, which identifies many potential problems, is also helping and employees are doing outstanding work often under difficult circumstances. It will be important for the Postal Service to maintain strong service performance as volumes pick up during the fall mailing season and election mail is added to the mix. Further, the second phase of consolidations could begin in February 2013 and could have an impact on service. Finally, mailers report that they are not solely concerned with service scores but that the Postal Service delivers the mail as promised. What has been your experience with service over the past few months? Have you been affected by the consolidations? Are you concerned about phase two of the network consolidation plan?
  • on Oct 31st, 2011 in Pricing & Rates | 12 comments
    When mailing a letter that weighs about one ounce, the U.S. Postal Service’s 44 cents is one of lowest First Class postage rates. Whether you are mailing a letter locally or sending a greeting card across country, it still only costs 44 cents now, but will increase to 45 cents in January. The graph below compares the U.S. Postal Service’s postage rate with other countries. As you can see, Norway charges the highest rate, which is nearly four times the cost U.S. rate.

     

    Source: 2011 Office of Inspector General analysis of Universal Postal Union data

    Some might feel it is reasonable for the Postal Service to increase rates and charge a fee comparable to those in other countries. On the contrary, others might say the Postal Service’s rate must remain at an affordable level, especially for people with lower incomes. They might also say raising the rate to a level found elsewhere would drive customers away even faster. When you think about prices paid for other goods and services, just how far does 44, 50, or even 75 cents go? By comparison, a small cup of coffee at McDonalds costs a dollar, a gallon of gasoline is over $3, and a gallon of milk is about $4. Share your thoughts below. This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Financial Reporting Directorate.
  • on Mar 7th, 2011 in Mail Processing & Transportation | 3 comments
    [dropcap style="font-size: 60px; color: #9b9b9b;"] E [/dropcap]very day, thousands of containers holding letters and large envelopes are flown across the country to meet Postal Service standards. As you might expect, in almost every case, it costs more to fly mail than to ship it on a truck or by train. Because of this, from a cost standpoint, it’s important that each mail container is filled to capacity. While conducting prior audits on other issues, we observed that large mail processing facilities were running multiple processing machines – even with declining mail volume. Running one machine full time to process mail results in full mail trays and tubs, while running multiple machines to process the same amount of mail results in multiple partially-filled trays and tubs. Running multiple machines may be efficient for processing facilities, but it results in transportation inefficiencies and increases costs. When you consider that it costs the Postal Service about a $1 per pound to fly mail, the cost of flying partially loaded mail trays and tubs could be substantial. In our current audit, we plan to look at information related to the density of First Class Mail on air transportation and assess the related costs, and we’d like your views. What do you think? How can the Postal Service make sure only full containers fly? One option might be to identify mail needing air transportation and process it separately from other mail? Is that a good option or would you recommend other methods? The Office of Audit Transportation team is hosting this topic.

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