• on Jul 11th, 2011 in Strategy & Public Policy | 17 comments
    The American marketplace is experiencing constant changes in the ways that companies conduct business and communicate with customers. Like other businesses, the Postal Service must also innovate to stay relevant. The Office of Inspector General plans to examine innovation processes currently used by major U.S. corporations to learn about best practices/processes. The essence of innovation is to identify a problem and develop solutions. For example, Google and Facebook are successful because their websites meet needs of people to manage and organize vast amounts of information and social relationships available on the Internet. The Postal Service has enjoyed some success with innovative products. Its Priority Mail Flat Rate products have become popular, shipping 350 million boxes over the last 6 years, with revenue of $1.2 billion in fiscal year 2010. This product met the need to simplify the shipping process and was relevant to both consumers and business. What should the Postal Service do to identify business opportunities and customer needs in order to create solutions that lead to financial success and customer satisfaction? Also, what experience(s) have you had with Postal Service innovation? This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Planning and Strategic Studies Directorate.
  • on Jul 4th, 2011 in Strategy & Public Policy | 3 comments
    In response to a Government Accountability Office report and a Congressional request, the Postal Service introduced its Transformation Plan in 2002. Since then, the Postal Service has seen many changes, including a new postmaster general (PMG) and senior management team. Mail volume has declined due to electronic diversion and the recession. In addition, the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act of 2006 changed how the Postal Service operates and conducts business. The Postal Service released its plan, Ensuring a Viable Postal Service for America: An Action Plan for the Future, in March 2010. The plan outlined cost-cutting, increased productivity, and legislative and regulatory changes necessary to maintain a viable Postal Service. In December 2010, the new PMG announced his four core strategies for the Postal Service: 1.Strengthening the business-to-consumer channel. 2.Improving the customer experience. 3.Competing for package business. 4.Becoming a leaner, faster, and smarter organization. It is a daunting task for any organization to implement new strategies. We have established an Audit Project Page to provide another opportunity for our stakeholders to comment on this issue. Click here to review – Postal Service Core Strategy Linkage. We are interested in hearing your views on the four core strategies. What is needed to ensure the success of these strategies and what outcomes do you believe the core strategies are intended to achieve? This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Planning and Strategic Studies Directorate.
  • on May 9th, 2011 in Strategy & Public Policy | 1 comment
    Globalization is not a new phenomenon. Throughout history, people sought better ways to correspond and trade over great distances. In recent times, a number of key forces emerged to fuel globalization. Perhaps most important, technological advancement like the internet, personal computers, mobile devices, and global positioning systems (GPS) energized globalization at an unprecedented pace by facilitating instant information transmission, regardless of distance, at a decreasing cost. The result was a dramatically changed business environment. Businesses and governments, capitalizing on new technologies to improve efficiency, trade, and financial performance, spurred international policy integration, operations standardization, and deregulation and privatization of many public monopolies like power companies. The postal services were no exception. The competitive pressures resulting from an increasingly interconnected marketplace such as the rise of integrators and electronic substitution created profound changes in the postal service ecosystem, which both threatened traditional mail segments and created new opportunities. As a result, the postal sector entered a new era that stimulated many foreign posts to adapt their business model to enter novel markets, diversify product offerings, and develop opportunities in non-traditional sectors to stem the posts’ declining mail businesses. Here are some options that foreign posts are already exploring:
  • E-commerce – Connect global shippers and consumers by extending customs clearance services to new products, offering international mailers access to domestic U.S. shipping, billing, or IP addresses for the easy purchase of U.S. goods, and creating competitively priced small parcels and packet products.
  • Border-free solutions – Provide global-direct retailers a cost-effective method to clear customs and remit duties, taxes, and shipping costs to the appropriate parties while providing an end consumer one total price. Consumers will flock to a provider that can deliver an affordable product with superior logistics, returns, payment, security and authentication services globally.
  • Logistics strategies and alliances beyond national borders – Collaborate with private carriers and other posts to provide the end-to-end service and comprehensive, world coverage that customers increasingly expect.
  • Foster exports-based prospects for Small to Medium Enterprises – Launch an integrated, multi-channel platform of e-commerce services and customized solutions that allow these companies to easily expand their export business online while reducing cross border costs and language barriers. Marginalized groups – Cater to the specific needs of citizens left behind by globalization by addressing underserved areas with a lack of infrastructure and technology necessary to connect to the global economy, provide cash card redemption, and distribute government services.
  • Bilateralism – Negotiate improvements to the Universal Postal Union rates posts pay to one another as well as enact direct entry and worksharing agreements to better meet customer needs and maintain profitability. Diplomacy can drive mutually beneficial outcomes even as globalization increases competition in liberalized home markets.
  • Global citizens – Develop a lean, one-stop integrated communication and transaction services including digital/physical address link, e-mailbox, digital concierge services, hybrid and reserve hybrid, digital currency and bill presentment. Ultimately, by reinventing itself as the comprehensive “communications platform,” the Postal Service can better serve an increasingly globalized American people.
  • Security concerns – Solve security and law enforcement challenges for consumers concerned with protecting sensitive information. Since an internationally accepted standard for user authentication and identity management does not currently exist, the Postal Service could leverage its trusted brand to develop a secure platform for sensitive messages and transactions.

  • Which option do you think for the most promising for the Postal Service to pursue? This blog is hosted by the OIG’s Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).

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