• on Aug 29th, 2011 in Products & Services | 5 comments
    The Pushing the Envelope blog recently described some of the barriers that have prevented the Postal Service from optimizing its network of retail facilities. This week we’d like your thoughts on the factors the Postal Service should consider in developing a retail network for the future. If the Postal Service were to rebuild its retail network from scratch — focusing on today’s consumer behaviors and needs — would it look as it does now? Today, there are about 32,000 brick and mortar postal-operated retail facilities. However, the Postal Service generates about 35 percent of retail revenue through alternative access channels. For example, customers can buy stamps and access postal services at http://www.usps.com/, self-service kiosks, grocery stores, retail outlets, and privately operated shipper locations. The availability of alternatives combined with declining mail volume and changing consumer needs has led the Postal Service to renew its efforts to optimize the retail facility network. In recent months, the Postal Service has initiated action to address some of the institutional barriers that have inhibited modernizing the postal retail network. For example, in July 2011, the agency published final rules to improve the Post Office closing and consolidation process. However, public debate looms over this initiative. Numerous news articles have circulated about the Postal Service’s plan to study thousands of retail facilities for discontinuance opportunities, some questioning whether the final rules conflict with postal laws. Others maintain that Post Offices are essential to keeping communities connected and businesses strong and therefore should remain open even if they are not profitable. What should the Postal Service consider as it seeks to transform its retail network to meet future consumer needs? This blog is hosted by the OIG’s Network Optimization Directorate.
  • on Aug 15th, 2011 in Products & Services | 18 comments
    In today’s world we have the opportunity to do just about anything with just the click of a mouse and a few key strokes. Recent studies show online retail sales continuing to grow despite the economic slowdown and decline of overall retail sales. A previous blog, Could Radio Frequency Identification Make the U.S. Postal Service the Premier Delivery System, stated, “Last year Americans spent $155.2 billion shopping online. This year Americans are projected to spend more than $190 billion.” Purchases made online have to be shipped and this provides a great opportunity for the Postal Service to increase parcel delivery service. The Postal Service delivers almost half the world’s mail and more than 171 billion pieces annually, of this amount, roughly 3 billion are packages (Source: 2010 Report on Form 10-K, United States Postal Service). In addition, the Postal Service is often the last mile option for delivering FedEx, UPS and DHL packages. In 2007, if given a choice, 46 percent of consumers would select the Postal Service to deliver their packages.(Source:Package Delivery Study conducted by comScore, March 2007.) The Postal Service has received several ideas for improving its parcel delivery service. Many suggest the Postal Service could be more competitive if it offered an improved track and trace and confirmation system. Other suggestions include reliable on-time delivery, increased speed of service, and a better loss and damage policy. This blog is hosted by the OIG’s Sales and Service Team.
  • on Nov 8th, 2010 in Products & Services | 19 comments
    The Post Office isn’t the only place to shop for mailing services. Postal Service customers can purchase products and services at postal stores and other facilities, and on-line at USPS.com. They can also call 1-800-ASK-USPS, to get answers to their questions and address their needs. Some of the more popular customer services options available are: •Finding a Zip Code™. •Shipping products and services. •Scheduling a pickup. •Locating a Post Office™. •Tracking and confirming shipments. •Changing addresses. •Getting information on delivery services. Are www.usps.com and 1-800-ASK-USPS useful, easy-to-use tools for customers? Could improvements make the tools more user-friendly? Let us know what you think of the customer service tools that are available. Are there additional products and/or services you would like to see added to www.usps.com or 1-800-ASK-USPS? This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Office of Audit Information Technology team.

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