• on Mar 8th, 2010 in Labor | 63 comments
    Undercover Boss,” a CBS show that began airing in February, follows Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) as they go undercover to work primarily in lower-level positions in their own companies. Beyond its entertainment value, the episodes have exposed a significant disconnect between senior management and employees. While featured CEO’s have not recently, if ever, worked in entry-level positions in their companies; in contrast, the Postal Service has a proud history of promoting from within. Many of its current officers have carried mail, sold stamps, or worked in mail processing plants. Yet, based on the comments posted on Pushing the Envelope, there is a “suggested” disconnect between postal management and its employees. Postal employees often say their managers fail to communicate various corporate policies to them, fail to listen to their comments and suggestions, and fail to understand how corporate policies ultimately affect field operations. If you think there is a disconnect between managers and employees at the Postal Service, what is the root cause? Can it be fixed? Do you have any other thoughts or suggestions? We’d like to hear from you. This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).
  • on Jan 19th, 2010 in Labor | 48 comments

    Recently Glassdoor.com announced the winners of the second annual “Employees' Choice Awards” for Best Places to Work.

    The Top 50 were selected from more than 37,000 companies reviewed by the nearly 100,000 employees who completed a 20-question survey on Glassdoor.com in 2009. Only companies who received at least 25 votes were included on the list. The survey questions relate to employees' attitudes about:
    • Career opportunities
    • Communication
    • Compensation and benefits
    • Employee morale, recognition and feedback
    • Senior Leadership
    • Work/life balance
    • Fairness and respect

     

    Southwest came in number one with a 4.7 rating on a scale of 1 to 5. United Airlines and Gibson Guitar are at the bottom of the reviewed companies with a 1.9 rating. FedEx scored a satisfactory rating of 3.8. Neutral ratings were given to UPS (3.1) and the Postal Service (2.8).

    What are your thoughts on the current workplace environment? How can it be improved?

    Has the workplace environment in the Postal Service gotten better or worse over the last 10 years and why?

    This topic is hosted by the OIG's Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).

  • on Sep 28th, 2009 in Labor | 190 comments
    Silly Signs, Silly Rules –- Know Any?

    Workplace rules exist for a reason. Some rules are designed to protect employees’ rights and their safety, while others protect the employer and workplace. Then there are some rules that are just plain silly, and we ask ourselves why are they even are in place.

    Sometimes the best way to find these rules is to ask. Last March, Major General Michael Oates of the Army’s 10th Mountain Division asked for information on the stupidest rules or policies in the Army in his Mountain Sound Off blog. Soldiers commented on everything from uniform regulations to policies on leave. FederalTimes.com borrowed the same idea and asked its readers, “What are the dumbest workplace rules affecting you?”

    Since we know you aren’t shy, we thought we’d ask you the same question about the Postal Service. What Postal Service workplace rules are hindering you from doing your job? Are there rules or processes in place that no longer apply or need to be changed to meet today’s business needs? Let us know what you think.

    This blog is hosted by the OIG's Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).

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