• on Feb 17th, 2009 in Ideas Worth Exploring | 23 comments
    The Postal Service requires full addresses on most mail, but this creates unnecessary complications for small local businesses such as pizza parlors and dry cleaners that simply want to send a flyer to every address in the surrounding area. It would be much easier for them to bring a stack of unaddressed mail pieces to the Postal Service and let the Postal Service deliver one to each address.

    The Postal Service previously worked on a concept called Neighborhood Mail to meet this need. Using Neighborhood Mail, a business could send unaddressed mail to potential customers in the community it serves. The Postal Service would tell the business how many pieces were necessary to cover the delivery area and charge it for delivery. Such a service is not unusual. Many postal services in other countries offer unaddressed mail service.

    Neighborhood Mail, however, has its opponents. Newspapers, which compete with mail for local advertising, opposed the development of the Neighborhood Mail concept in the past. Neighborhood Mail would also compete with mail consolidators and alternate delivery providers which currently help small businesses deliver information to the community. In addition, unaddressed mail could raise environmental concerns, so the Postal Service might want to offer households the ability to opt out of receiving Neighborhood Mail.

    What do you think about Neighborhood Mail? Are there other services the Postal Service could introduce to help local communities?

  • on Jan 16th, 2009 in Ideas Worth Exploring | 14 comments
    A recent presentation by Deutsche Post describes the German delivery and logistics company’s efforts to transform its retail network. One particularly interesting innovation is self-service Packstations. Like the U.S. Postal Service’s APCs (Automated Postal Centers), these kiosks allow customers to ship packages. However, Packstations also provide 24-hour access for parcel pickup. Customers can register to receive their packages at any packstation in the country. When the package arrives, the recipient receives an e-mail or text message. Rather than rushing to the post office before it closes, customers can use their card and pin number to retrieve it at any time. This convenience is particularly helpful for people who have no way to get to a post office when it is open.

    Deutsche Post already has 1,500 Packstations in Germany and is planning to add 1,000 more. What do you think about Packstations? Would you use one?

    Should the U.S. Postal Service look into providing 24-hour parcel pickup? If so, how? What about combining APCs with parcel pickup?

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