on Mar 6th, 2013 in Ideas Worth Exploring | 1 comment
 

Powerful forces like globalization and the digital revolution are changing how, when, and where things are produced, purchased, and delivered. Look at how our shopping habits have changed in just the past few years. With your smartphone or tablet you can shop anytime, anyplace. Offshore production trends are reversing, and some manufacturing jobs are returning to the United States. And major urban areas continue to grow and link into a global transportation supergrid that connects people, commerce, and ideas. If you’re left off the grid, you could find yourself disconnected from the new global economy.

The U.S. Postal Service Office of Inspector General recently released a white paper discussing the new logistics revolution and all the challenges and opportunities it presents — The Global Logistics Revolution: A Pivotal Moment for the Postal Service. The paper asks, in the face of all these changes, how can we make sure citizens and commerce continue to thrive? Perhaps postal organizations – here and around the world – have a key role to play. Some foreign posts already provide an array of logistics services ranging from comprehensive warehousing to customized, end-to-end cross-border and returns solutions that better serve customers and the new global economy. For some of these posts, these “value-added” logistics services are providing a new revenue stream to offset steep declines in traditional mail volume.

The Postal Service is also well positioned to move into the large and fast-growing logistics market. With its extensive first and last-mile reach to nearly every household and business in the United States and mission to “bind the nation together” through communications and commerce, the Postal Service is unmatched in keeping communities connected. Either on its own or by partnering with private sector companies, the Postal Service could offer a range of new services and products to meet the evolving needs of citizens and business across the country. A service could be as basic as comprehensive track and trace to more complex offerings like warehousing solutions. If the Postal Service does not at least keep up with emerging customer expectations for improved and expanded logistics services, it could jeopardize its position in the evolving expedited and small package market.

We encourage you to read the white paper to learn about how the Postal Service could respond to the Global Logistics Revolution and then weigh in with your thoughts below.

Do you think that the Postal Service’s ability to offer new, value-added logistics services could help respond to customers’ changing needs?

1 Comments


This is a double see page 1

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