on Aug 6th, 2012 in Finances: Cost & Revenue | 10 comments
 
The Postal Service has built a strong brand name around service, trust, and security. Few other organizations can lay claim to such a strong brand, one with more than 200 years of history and cultivated by the Postal Service’s consistent fulfillment of its mission to securely deliver mail to every American, regardless of location, at a reasonable price. For 6 straight years, the Ponemon Institute has named the Postal Service the most trusted government agency and one of the top 10 most trusted businesses in the nation. Many postal observers have encouraged the Postal Service to leverage this “trusted brand” to expand its offerings in the digital market. But a steady drumbeat of bad news over the past few years around its financial situation, potential cuts in service, and uncertainty over its retail and network downsizing plans has unsettled stakeholders. The question many of them ask is whether the ongoing negative news coverage could be hurting the overall brand. Even the PMG noted earlier this year that the mailing industry is experiencing a “crisis in confidence.” Lingering uncertainty about the Postal Service’s future could further erode confidence. Further, competitors can use the turmoil to their advantage, touting their own services as easy and reliable in the face of uncertainty. What do you think? Have the ongoing news reports about the Postal Service’s finances and uncertain future affected your view of the organization? Do you think these reports hurt the Postal Service brand? Or is the Postal Service doing the best it can under the circumstances?

10 Comments


Privatizing the postal service for serving American
better, it's the only way.

When have you ever heard a CEO speak about their company the way our postmaster does? Of course it has been bad for business. If you tell everyone you are going out of business people lose trust and find alternatives.

Without a doubt, the ongoing news reports about the Postal Service’s finances and uncertain future adversely affect people's view of the organization.

Big postal mangement waste lots of money, it is the reason they lose money.

You can thank our own PMG Donahoe for that, and the Congress and the House of Representatives and the President of the United States - all of whom are too consumed in attaining their own agendas in lieu of taking care of the American people they 'represent.'

Shame goes to our government. Shame, shame, shame. I don't see how any of them can hold their heads up and take a paycheck, considereing the fact that they have done NOTHING to earn that paycheck.

Here's one example:

When you reserve a P.O. Box online, you see both the physical address of the building and a PO Box number. In some cases, the building zip code is different than the zip code for the PO boxes, leading to confusion among the citizens, and frequent returned packages because the postal system does not read and understand the address, so that the system (or employees) recognize that the package is going to a post office box. The result is that some packages are delivered, while many are simply returned, costing the citizens money and time.

Just one person who is aware of the surrounding addresses and zip codes could easily recognize and properly route these packages with dual addresses.

One system step that could help fix the P. O. Box problem is to tell the customer, via the site and when they get the keys, the correct address, pointing out in cases where the physical address is different than the PO Box address and zip code.

For a citizen, when they see the physical address of the post office where their box is located, most will infer that the physical address and zip of the building is the SAME as that of their PO Box within that building, unless it is CLEARLY and EMPHATICALLY stated otherwise (which it currently is not).

Funny, I thought the OIG was the branch of the government that TOOK the Postal Inspection Services' responsibilities. Why is it reporting, speculating, guessing at Postal Services popularity ? Are they going to go jail some news reporter? Arrest the GOP for doing as they are ? Or just continue the "drumbeat" that will make it easier for privatization. I'm saddened that as a letter carrier, everytime there are serious changes, the craft "pays" for it. So please, keep up the great reporting. Better yet, hire some more on Postal monies and call them reporters....not inspectors

Reality: The USPS is not what it used to be. As good as it might be, it still makes numerous avoidable errors and its office and management personnel in general are known to be surly and non effective. They have secure govmt jobs and cannot be fired...even for incompetence. They are approaching the IRS in the complexity of the system that generates and more effectively delivers junk mail at the cheapest rates than it can personal premium mail. In April sent IRS forms & check by certified mail at premium cost and allows for proof of delivery via internet. In August still no verification of delivery and USPS personnel deny any responsibility.
I put in a hold at PO for vacation request, only to return and find my mail in a bin outside, open to public theft and scrutiny. I do have a secure mail slot it could have been put in!...where some of my mail was instead of at the PO. When PO notified, they had no responsibility, no answers,knowledge of why, or real concern. "Accidents happen!" it is against their own laws to leave the mail outside like that, but...!!! So the truth is that if you ask people of their general opinion, you will find it very mixed...much like the government in general...it has major problems that can be fixed...but it is government!! not really acceptable!

I suggest asking these fellas what they think of the brand?

http://www.huschblackwell.com/images/PostalResources/USPSsuppliersFY2011.pdf

And which employees in the postal service have created that most trusted feeling? Carriers, clerks and postmasters, that's who. It's not the beancounters, papershufflers and martinet managers. Perhaps you should ask them for advice.

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