• on Mar 28th, 2011 in Delivery & Collection | 57 comments
    [dropcap style="font-size: 60px; color: #9b9b9b;"]L[/dropcap]ast Thursday the Postal Regulatory Commission (PRC) issued its advisory opinion on the U. S. Postal Service’s proposal to switch to five-day delivery. Following a year-long analysis, the PRC voiced concerns with the request, questioning the potential savings, the impact on service, and the effect on communities, especially in rural areas. However, the Commission was unable to reach a consensus and did not issue an opinion to endorse or reject the proposal to cut Saturday delivery. The Postal Service responded with a statement from the Postmaster General, reiterating that five-day delivery is a core element of the Postal Service’s strategy for the future. The statement also said the Postal Service will continue to press its case before Congress, which has the authority to change delivery requirements. Do you think the Postal Service has a case for five-day delivery? Although 5-day delivery is a key element of the Postal Service's future plans, there are many other options under consideration at this point in time. In your mind, what do you think are the most important options? Give your comments below. Note: The U.S. Governement Accountability office just released its own report on 5-day delivery. This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).

     

     

     

  • on Mar 21st, 2011 in Post Offices & Retail Network | 26 comments
    [dropcap style="font-size: 60px; color: #9b9b9b;"]I[/dropcap]n fiscal year 2009, the U.S. Postal Service spent more than $149 million in manufacturing, shipping, and fulfillment costs for Express Mail® and Priority Mail® packaging supplies. The Postal Service, like FedEx, provides these supplies at no cost to customers and the public. The packaging is Postal Service property and, therefore, should only be used to send Express and Priority mail packages. However, some customers use the boxes, envelopes, and labels for other purposes and in some cases, customers use the packaging to mail items using the Postal Service’s competitors. This adds additional costs to the Postal Service and violates federal law. The question is balancing the desire to control costs with maintaining the convenience that customers desire. The Postal Service must ensure the supplies it provides are used appropriately, but what’s the best way to do this? Are the savings worth the logistics and costs of monitoring and the inconvenience for customers? How do competitors monitor the use of packaging supplies? This topic is hosted by the Office of Audit Field Financial – West team.
  • on Mar 14th, 2011 in Strategy & Public Policy | 13 comments
    How can the Postal Service solve its financial problems? What is the future role of the Postal Service at a time when digital alternatives are replacing many of the functions of hard copy mail? These are the questions facing policymakers and the postal community. Sometimes the best way to answer serious questions is to ask even more questions. A deeper look at foundational issues can provide valuable guidance for reaching the right decisions. Last month, the OIG issued a white paper Fundamental Questions for the Future of the Postal Service. In the paper, we pose eight questions that we think are fundamental for determining the role of the Postal Service in the 21st century: 1. What is the nation’s essential need for the Postal Service in the 21st century? 2. Is a profit-driven business or a national infrastructure best suited to carry out the Postal Service’s mission? 3. How should the nation’s Postal Service be financed? 4. What is the proper governance model for the Postal Service? 5. What does the universal service obligation mean? 6. Does monopoly-financed universal service assist or harm the Postal Service? 7. Should the Postal Service be allowed to expand into nonpostal services to supplement monopoly shortfall? 8. Should the Postal Service have additional social responsibilities beyond its core mission? We are raising these questions not to provide answers but to spur discussion. We want to hear your views. What do you think the right answers are? Have we left any fundamental questions out? This topic is hosted by the OIG’s Risk Analysis Research Center (RARC).

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